U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Allergies
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-08-2018, 08:25 PM
 
387 posts, read 264,885 times
Reputation: 953

Advertisements

I did allergy shots for a few years with some good results. But they were hard to manage within my work schedule.

At the advice of a nutritionist, I switched to allergy drops instead. I place them under my tongue every day. Allergena is the name of the company who makes them.

It's the same as taking shots but milder doses so you don't over tax your system.

I have had great results with taking the pollen mix for my area plus mold and dust mites.

My sister had a bad reaction: the formula was too strong for her.

The nutritionist told me I must also build up my immune system.

For years allergy doctors have prescribed steroids for me in the forms of topical, nasal, and finally systemic via shots. Steroids work by shutting down the immune system. So while I got wonderful temporary relief from symptoms, I was setting myself up for more serious problems with my future allergy reactions and all-over health.

So I am eating better (avoiding dairy, grains, and starches, esp sugar) and taking multivitamins, esp B12, and burpless fish oil capsules to build my immune system.

After a few years of this, I now only take antihistamines once a month or so. A big improvement for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-08-2018, 01:22 PM
 
26,302 posts, read 12,780,504 times
Reputation: 12539
Im currently going through the shot regiman. Many allergists like to force patients to come in for their shots. Its not about your safety, its about their money. Mine? They give me 2 vials of custom made cocktails for the 42 things I tested as allergic too. They trained me in how to give myself the shots, and so every other day I inject myself in each arm.

Im about 3 months in. The day after the shots is rough. But the day after that? I feel better then I normally did in the past. And its getting slowly better. So for me its working. Studies I have seen say it helps about 85% of people, but "helps" is a pretty wide range of values from completely cures, to improves slightly. But there are a LOT of shots. And it can get rough after them. Plus the whole thing about staying by the epipens in case suddenly your body decides that you should try dying instead IS sort of concerning.

So the answer to me in my opinion is.....if you have really bad allergies? This is worth a try. But if your allergists makes you go in for all the shots? Find a new one unless they can actually justify it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2018, 02:35 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,621 posts, read 18,693,933 times
Reputation: 33345
Quote:
Originally Posted by greywar View Post
Im currently going through the shot regiman. Many allergists like to force patients to come in for their shots. Its not about your safety, its about their money. Mine? They give me 2 vials of custom made cocktails for the 42 things I tested as allergic too. They trained me in how to give myself the shots, and so every other day I inject myself in each arm.

Im about 3 months in. The day after the shots is rough. But the day after that? I feel better then I normally did in the past. And its getting slowly better. So for me its working. Studies I have seen say it helps about 85% of people, but "helps" is a pretty wide range of values from completely cures, to improves slightly. But there are a LOT of shots. And it can get rough after them. Plus the whole thing about staying by the epipens in case suddenly your body decides that you should try dying instead IS sort of concerning.

So the answer to me in my opinion is.....if you have really bad allergies? This is worth a try. But if your allergists makes you go in for all the shots? Find a new one unless they can actually justify it.
I had really bad allergies and the shots I got were custom made. I mean that I was tested individually for each particular mold instead of just getting blasted with "mold mix." Some molds I was barely allergic to while one mold, every time I was tested for it, I would fall over in the chair! They had the antidote handy at all times for these cases of extreme reactions.

I ended up getting a shot in each arm--one for all the molds I was allergic to and the other for dust, cat dander, several tree pollens, etc. The great thing was that since the testing was so individualistic, there was just about zero chance of ever having a reaction from the shot. I was able to start off at my own dose and stay at that dose. They said that reactions usually occur when a dose is increased, as it is with the other kind of shots.

Another advantage was that I didn't have to go according to a schedule. I just went maybe once a week at first, then every other week, then less frequently. No appointment, just walk it, get your shot, and leave. Not sitting around to see if your're going to have a reaction.

One of the best advantages was that these shots worked fast. It probably took a couple of weeks for them to kick in initially. During pollen season, if I hadn't been in a while and my head was all stuffed up, I'd get the shot, and my head would clear up while in was in the car driving home. That's because I already had some immunity built up and the shot was at my actual dose, the dose level that was pre-determined by the testing.
__________________
my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2018, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,160 posts, read 8,042,476 times
Reputation: 15138
Quote:
Originally Posted by greywar View Post
Im currently going through the shot regiman. Many allergists like to force patients to come in for their shots. Its not about your safety, its about their money. Mine? They give me 2 vials of custom made cocktails for the 42 things I tested as allergic too. They trained me in how to give myself the shots, and so every other day I inject myself in each arm.

Im about 3 months in. The day after the shots is rough. But the day after that? I feel better then I normally did in the past. And its getting slowly better. So for me its working. Studies I have seen say it helps about 85% of people, but "helps" is a pretty wide range of values from completely cures, to improves slightly. But there are a LOT of shots. And it can get rough after them. Plus the whole thing about staying by the epipens in case suddenly your body decides that you should try dying instead IS sort of concerning.

So the answer to me in my opinion is.....if you have really bad allergies? This is worth a try. But if your allergists makes you go in for all the shots? Find a new one unless they can actually justify it.
Oh the year or so before 1995 I was seeing an allergist, he had wall to wall patients, and no one was getting better, me for sure. I got the shots in his office, did the scratch tests first of course, and then along the way he taught me to give my shots at home..so I was doing that and NOT getting any better. Still take the otc drugs and his shots.

Then in 1995 I attended a lecture on Pycnogenol and we were told it "may" prevent cancer(S) and hearing that was music to my ears. I started and stayed on pycnogenol for the first year, into Pyc about a week or so my allergies started to go away, it was like a miracle. That was the end of the shots and drugs and after the first year on Pyc I found Grape Seed Extract with my research and was told it did the same t hings only was less money. So long story short, I'm headed to 23 yrs on Pyc and then Grape Seed Ex and no more docs or drugs. And for like 20 yrs hardly blew my nose.

These antioxidants are short of a miracle in my life...I hardly see any doctors and I'll be 80 this year.

What we go thru with pharma drugs and doctors and a natural FOOD medicine is waiting for us and all we have to do is meet it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2018, 12:13 AM
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
4,859 posts, read 2,236,968 times
Reputation: 16394
Quote:
Originally Posted by elyn02 View Post
The lady I mentioned earlier suffers from allergies. She had to stop allergy shots because she was having severe reactions to them. Her normal oximeter range is 65%.
WHAT?? She needs to be on oxygen. Like now. Right now. She needs to sleep with it on & go out with it on ...

This is more than allergies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2018, 09:21 PM
 
5 posts, read 2,612 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by profnot View Post
I did allergy shots for a few years with some good results. But they were hard to manage within my work schedule.

At the advice of a nutritionist, I switched to allergy drops instead. I place them under my tongue every day. Allergena is the name of the company who makes them.

It's the same as taking shots but milder doses so you don't over tax your system.

I have had great results with taking the pollen mix for my area plus mold and dust mites.

My sister had a bad reaction: the formula was too strong for her.

The nutritionist told me I must also build up my immune system.

For years allergy doctors have prescribed steroids for me in the forms of topical, nasal, and finally systemic via shots. Steroids work by shutting down the immune system. So while I got wonderful temporary relief from symptoms, I was setting myself up for more serious problems with my future allergy reactions and all-over health.

So I am eating better (avoiding dairy, grains, and starches, esp sugar) and taking multivitamins, esp B12, and burpless fish oil capsules to build my immune system.

After a few years of this, I now only take antihistamines once a month or so. A big improvement for me.
The allergy drops are not approved by the FDA and are not covered by insurance. CMS does not authorize it. There has been no quality studies or research to prove they work hence the reason it's not approved by the FDA and CMS (covered by insurance). There have been cases of fraud where primary care doctors and other non allergy specialists have prescribed oral drops and billed it as allergy injections. Patients are unaware of this. If a doctor or another healthcare provider bills oral allergy drops or claims it is covered by your insurance, you should report that provider to your state medical board and insurance company. You do not want to be implicated in a case of fraud.

The drops do not work because you need a certain concentration of the allergen in your body for your immune system to develop an immunogenic response in which your T cells adapt and develop tolerance to the allergens. When you are using drops, the concentration of the allergen is so low and then undergoes further processing in the stomach (gastric acid). By the time any of the antigen reaches your blood stream, the amount and concentration is so low, it's effects are minimal. The reason the shots work is they are administered systemically (through an injection) subcutaneously. So when the author claims "it does not tax your system", well it won't work then because "taxing your system" is how the allergy injections work.

The drops are often employed by non-allergists as a way to make extra money. Since it is not covered by insurance, these providers often charge cash (~$2000) It is often marketed as a "shot free" approach and one in which patients can do from the convenience of their home. When they compared the oral drops to placebo in double blind studies, they found there was no statistical difference. Therefore, those who felt benefit from is likely due to a placebo effect.

The only proven and disease modifying therapy is allergy injections. They have been proven to be successful in up to 95% of cases. The duration of therapy is 3-5 years. Most patients who claim the injections do not work were not on them long enough. You will often hear patients claim they were on them for months before discontinuing them or 1-2 years before quitting. Most of these patients were not compliant with the injection scheduled and never reached their maintenance dose. The maintenance dose is the dose at which the therapy works. So it would be like taking 10 mg of aspirin for months or years and claiming it doesn't work. In order to receive the immunogenic response or "cure" from the injections, you have to reach the maintenance dose and be on that dose for years.

Allergy injections are not without risks. You can have an anaphylactic reaction with each shot. This is why shots are given a doctors' office and patients are supervised after each injection. This is also why they are not safe to be given at home. If you have a reaction, you will need epinephrine and may need a second dose. Reactions are rare but do occur. Typically, when supervised in a doctor's office, the intervention to treat the reaction is swift and there is no further reaction or ill effects. But in a home setting, there have been reports of death and 911/emergency calls because the patient was not prescribed epinephrine nor educated on what to do in the event of anaphylaxis. No responsible physician would allow a patient to administer injections at home. This is also why the oral drops and other "take home" therapies do not work. If they were potent enough to cause an immunogenic response, they could cause anaphylaxis; and trust me if that were the case, those providers would not be comfortable sending you home with that.

There are no "steroids" in the allergy injections. This is another piece of misinformation. There are no antihistamines or other medications in the injections. The only thing in the allergy injections are water and the allergens (grass, trees, weeds etc). In essence, it is the most "natural" form of therapy you can receive. It is the best form of therapy for anyone who is concerned about using too many oral steroids, antihistamines and other OTC medications to treat their allergies. The injections are disease modifying and most patients are able to be discontinued from these OTC medications when they have completed the course.

If you are interested in allergy injections, only see a physician who was board certified in allergy. Do not see a nutritionist, homeopath, naturopath, PCP, ENT or others who were not formally trained in the field of allergy immunology. When it comes to allergies there is a lot of misinformation out there. Patients should be educated before being sold on therapies that do not work (oral drops for one). Unlike the oral drops and other forms of therapy, allergy injections have been proven to work, are approved by the FDA, and are covered by insurance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
These antioxidants are short of a miracle in my life...I hardly see any doctors and I'll be 80 this year. What we go thru with pharma drugs and doctors and a natural FOOD medicine is waiting for us and all we have to do is meet it.
The herbal/supplement/vitamin is just another industry. It's a billion dollar industry. It costs little to manufacture those pills because most of their ingredients are easily available and many are trace elements. Yet, the profit margin is large because they are charge exorbitant prices compared to the cost to manufacture them. The difference is this industry is not regulated by the FDA so they can legally make unsubstantiated claims without fear of litigation. This is a real problem with this industry and the only people who suffer are the public who don't know what to believe. I feel the FDA needs to step in and protect the public from these herbal/vitamin/supplement manufacturers who don't have to follow any guidelines and can make any unsubstantiated claims without recourse. This industry is successful in part by demonizing the medical establishment. You can witness that on these forums. There is a natural proclivity in some to oppose the status quo regardless. This industry is clever and knows they will always have their followers much like every cult has it's share of followers.

Last edited by idiopathic; 07-21-2018 at 10:46 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2018, 10:19 PM
 
5 posts, read 2,612 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by greywar View Post
Im currently going through the shot regiman. Many allergists like to force patients to come in for their shots. Its not about your safety, its about their money. Mine? They give me 2 vials of custom made cocktails for the 42 things I tested as allergic too. They trained me in how to give myself the shots, and so every other day I inject myself in each arm.
Allergists lose money on administering the actual injection. They get paid very little for actually providing the injection ($5-10). They have to hire additional nurses to administer the shots. They have to purchase large refrigerators to host the vials. They require computers with tracking software to keep track of dosing information. They have to equip and maintain a crash cart with epinephrine and other medications to treat anaphylaxis. They have to supervise you for 30 minutes following your injection. They have to devote their time and resources to treat you in the event you have anaphylaxis. They have to provide a waiting room with enough space to house the patients who are waiting. It would be much more cost effective to just send you home with the shots. It would also entice more people to do it. I can assure you, they are not making patients wait to make $5-$10 per injection.

The real reason they do not let patients administer them at home is anaphylaxis is real and does occur. It is a medicolegal risk. It's puts the patients health at risk and places the doctors license at risk. If a patient has anaphylaxis at home, the doctor could lose his or her license and be subject to a lawsuit. If an allergist is going by the evidence based guidelines meaning using the proper amount of the extract to diluent (water) it most definitely can cause anaphylaxis. The only deaths recorded from allergy injections were in those patients who were not supervised. They were given at home or the patient left without waiting the 30 minutes.

This leads me to my next point, I would be very skeptical of any doctor who told you that you could give the shots to yourself at home. Most likely this doctor is not an allergist because those who are trained in allergy are aware of the risks of anaphylaxis and have witnessed it. The other concern is how effective are those shots? Meaning if I made an allergy shot with very little extract and nearly all water, the risk of anaphylaxis is so low that the provider would be comfortable sending you home knowing your chances of having a reaction are practically zero since it's "watered down." It also suggests those injections are likely not very effective since it's probably not the real thing. (1:1 ratio)

I am fairly certain you are not seeing a board certified allergist. Allowing patients to go home unsupervised is considered practicing against the standard of care. If your provider were reported to your state medical board, he or she would likely be called before the board and could risk losing his or her medical license. That provider is putting patients at risk. I've seen non-allergists allowing patients to take their injections home. One such patients had to call an ambulance and rushed to the ER because her anaphylaxis was so severe.

Last edited by idiopathic; 07-21-2018 at 10:55 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2018, 09:16 AM
 
Location: .N6 A4
3,467 posts, read 4,350,710 times
Reputation: 2802
Quote:
Originally Posted by idiopathic View Post
There has been no quality studies or research to prove they work hence the reason it's not approved by the FDA and CMS (covered by insurance).
Here is a fifty page bibliography of research on SLIT. Maybe none of this research is any good, but at a glance, this bibliography appears to draw mostly from standard peer reviewed journals:

https://www.allergychoices.com/wp-co...raphy-2018.pdf
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2018, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Texas or Cascais, Portugal
3,402 posts, read 3,161,389 times
Reputation: 8233
Did allergy shots about 10 years back and never felt worse in my life. Not only did my allergies not improve but, I felt constantly run down the entire time I was on the shots. And, came down with MRSA, squamous cell skin cancer, and a host of other issues that year. One doctor opined the shots were suppressing my immune system.

A couple of years ago, I did oral allergy drops (under the tongue). Less stress on the immune system and I did feel that my allergies were better for a year or so but still, no permanent results. I think when you have an altered immune system, it just does not matter what you do. Eliminate one irritant and your whacked immune system will find another to replace it with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2018, 01:13 PM
 
Location: London, KY
718 posts, read 1,450,164 times
Reputation: 538
I see a board certified allergist, and am allowed to take the injections at home. The allergist made an exception because I'm an RN, and I have both injections of epi available in case of anaphylactic shock. As such, the worst reaction I've had has localized swelling and itching around the injection site. Because I'm a bit of a worrier, I even take Xyzal 10mg an hour or so prior to a shot.

I have nothing but good things to say about allergy shots. I still have occasional sinus headaches and sneezing, but my allergies have improved significantly in just over the past 7 months of allergy shots.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Allergies
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top