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Old 06-23-2011, 09:15 PM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
For what it's worth, CHILE is one of the few world countries that do not allow divorce at all. (Another is the Philippines, and until 1995 Ireland did not).
Malta did not allow divorce until this year. Even then I think the referendum only allowed divorce if you'd lived apart for at least four years.

The UN seems to indicate Peru's a pretty safe country. Not sure I buy that, but they place them as low in murder and not that bad in natural disasters. Paraguay is placed as high in murder, but low in robbery.

International Human Development Indicators - UNDP
International Human Development Indicators - UNDP
International Human Development Indicators - UNDP

I've heard good things about Uruguay, but it might be too non-traditional and cool for what you ask.
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Old 06-23-2011, 09:21 PM
 
Location: classified
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BridgettFowler View Post
Where is a safe place for a family to move to in South America.

Both me and my mother have severe arthritis and Florida cost way to much for us to move to. I have three children and both my mother and I are widowed. I was told by a friend of mine there are countries that have nice traditional family values. I was thinking of Peru. But he said people wont real friendly there. Im waiting to finish my Engineering degree and I have a Biology degree so I would like a city that is not crazy busy. A place that warm all year round, traditional, I don't mind night life as long as children are included. We are really looking for a relaxed community, small personal owned businesses, maybe 30min or 1 hour from the ocean.

Any input would be great we are guessing about 2 to 3 years before we are able to move.
Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay have been popular destinations for offshoring so that might be an option depending on your ability to understand or learn spanish.
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Old 06-23-2011, 09:33 PM
 
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I would absolutely NOT move anywhere (especially permanently!!) before spending a good amount of time there. Several months, at the very minimum.
The worst thing one can do is make a decision which is extremely relevant to one and one's family based on "my friend said".
Every person has different needs and wants, and only one can evaluate what is more adequate to oneself.

Two things people fail to take into consideration before "choosing" a place to live is the actual feasibility of 1.being accepted (bureaucracy-wise) as a permanent immigrant and 2.how willing one is to adapt to most things in the "new home" (language, culture, etc.)

This is NOT directed at the OP, but in general: remember, it is one who must adapt; the natives are not automatically supposed to go above and beyond to accommodate and welcome a newcomer, so every time I hear "they are not friendly enough" I often think "well, one (the newcomer) has to do one's part (which happens to be the bigger part) too, no?!"

There are several options which I think would be a nice fit; Chile and Ecuador come to mind at first. However, these are countries which unfortunately face earthquakes, if that is a major concern in your decision.
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Old 06-23-2011, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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I think you need to explain in more detail exactly what you mean by family values, and how you expect your personal life to be influenced by the values of the other families in your neighborhood.

Even in countries where divorce is impossible, families still break up and ex-partners find new arrangements for themselves, but they just don't re-marry their second "spouse", because they can't dissolve the official marriage that they are in with someone else. But it doesn't really change anything.

I think, in some ways, you will find that the family values of South America are so rigid and traditional, that you will actually find them to be oppressive.

Also, tell us how big a city you want to live in.

Northern Chile would be an excellent choice, Arica is a lovely and prosperous city and would be a very comfortable place to live. It rains there so rarely (i.e., absolutely never, ever), that houses have roofs (more like plastic awnings) only to keep the bright sun and the dust out. Although it never rains, it is very green, because it's well watered from the melting snow from the Andes, looming in your backyard. It's well within the tropics, but kept cool by the cold Pacific current, and there are penguins there.

Uruguay would be lovely, too, very quiet and laid back, old-fashioned but prosperous with no poverty to speak of, and near beaches. But not as warm as Florida.

Some very attractive and liveable medium-sized cities, but away from beaches, would be Merida, Venezuela; Popayan, Colombia; Tarija, Bolivia; and Salto, Uruguay. Somewhat bigger, Mendoza, Argentina, and Asuncion, Paraguay. For a big city, Medellin, Colombia, is regaining its reputation as one of the most beautiful and liveable cities in the world, now that the cartel has been cleaned out.

Last edited by jtur88; 06-23-2011 at 10:45 PM..
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Old 06-24-2011, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,149,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miaiam View Post
I would absolutely NOT move anywhere (especially permanently!!) before spending a good amount of time there. Several months, at the very minimum.
The worst thing one can do is make a decision which is extremely relevant to one and one's family based on "my friend said".
As a person who has lived many years abroad, I agree with this statement.

It takes a lot to be an expat, and mostly it takes being younger, being more free, and a previous commitment to the language and culture and years of being interested in the country that you want to go to.

Plus you need to be there, and get a strong feel if its somewhere that'll work for you. Even more heavier concerns come up if you have a family - i.e. health concerns, education concerns, adjustment issues for the family, etc.
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Old 06-24-2011, 10:18 PM
 
2,065 posts, read 4,177,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
As a person who has lived many years abroad, I agree with this statement.
How do you think I know that, Tiger Beer?
It is my understanding one only fully understands what an expat goes through - and what it takes to be an expat, for that matter - after being one.
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Old 06-24-2011, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,231,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post

It takes a lot to be an expat, and mostly it takes being younger, being more free, and a previous commitment to the language and culture and years of being interested in the country that you want to go to.

.
While that is sound advice in general, it is untrue often enough. I've known plenty of people who walked into a country on a whim, and sat down, and never got up. It does take a certain kind of person, but the person could still be lurking inside someone who has never had the chance to learn the ropes before.

I've seen it in all kinds of people who became seasoned expats, from former big league ball players, to a retried Texas oilman, who buried his wife, went back to his house, said This isn't home anymore, and phoned his son to drive him to the airport.

The mere fact that someone is inspired to do it is a pretty large ingredient of potential success.
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Old 06-25-2011, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
2,564 posts, read 4,651,676 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BridgettFowler View Post
Both me and my mother have severe arthritis and Florida cost way to much for us to move to.

(...)

A place that warm all year round,
It seems to me that the OP is interested in a place that is "warm all year round", for health reasons. So, I don't think Chile, Argentina or Uruguay are an option. And that's why I recommend Northeastern Brazil. It's warm all year round.
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Old 06-26-2011, 02:14 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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There are places in Argentina that are "warm" all year long. Check out the weather in Córdoba, Mendoza or Tucumán for example.
In Chile i think only Arica is warm all year long, but i think only that city cause Chile is thin and has the ocean so that makes the climate more oceanic i think.
Uruguay definetely not, all the countrie is the same size (and latitude) as Buenos Aires province and, while its warm enough (a warm temperate climate, or humid subtropical one would say) you still get the cold winters (today in BA we are in the 30s, and i guess Montevideo is getting similar conditions).
But in Argentina basically up of Buenos Aires province you have a lot of all year warm cities. Check it out in weather sites and you´ll see.
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Old 06-26-2011, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
2,564 posts, read 4,651,676 times
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Well, it depends what a person consider to be "warm". For me, a place "warm all year long" is a place where temperatures never go bellow 70º F (21º C), even in the winter nights. Maybe it's because this is the climate I'm used to, here where I live.
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