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View Poll Results: Best city for families
Houston, Texas 9 45.00%
Los Angeles, California 2 10.00%
Rio de Janiero, Brazil 9 45.00%
Voters: 20. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-26-2011, 09:37 PM
 
6,349 posts, read 8,392,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
That's the other thing I loved about Brazil. Not that there aren't racial issues there, as there are, but racial tensions are significantly significantly less.

You'll see every kind of shade of black and white, all mixed in, and socializing regularly together.

There isn't such a you're white, you do this, and you're black, you do this type of thing. It's all fluid in Brazil...at least on the social level.

On the economic level, there is definitely a skewed, lighter skin makes more money and has more access to jobs thing going on. But on a social level, skin pigmentation doesn't dictate friendships or who you hangout with, or even family, really. Even in the same families, you have very light-skinned and very dark-skinned. That's a major refreshing change from what we're used to in the U.S. with it's skin divisions - particularly among black and white.
True. In Rio Grande Do Sul there is a little racism in the countryside, and probably exist to a degree in all of Brasil. However, I would say there is discrimination based on social class. You dont see the rich mingling with the poor as much as you do in the US.

I think Brasil is going in the right direction with its social programs. People are constantly being lifted out of poverty and opportunities are definitely growing for rich and poor alike. In the USA it is the opposite. Poverty increasing and opportunity is decreasing.
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Old 07-26-2011, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,164,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wargod View Post
The wife and I do worry about our teenager, but I feel she will be just as safe at the American school in Rio, as she is here in LA, and as she would be a one of the best Quaker, private, schools in Houston. Due to all of the kind responses I have received; after, I leave Rio, if the wife agrees, Houston here we come. LOL, I would choose Rio to Detroit any day. My daughter and wife speak Spanish, I on the other hand barely remember English, LOL. Is it easy for a Spanish speaker to pick up Brazilian Portuguese? The kids out hear in LA have their own language Spanglish. I can only speak the Kings English and I work so many long hours I doubt I will have time to pick up another, LOL. Thanks again and please anyone with strong ties to Brazil, Sao Paulo or Rio, email me.
Regarding your teenage daughter. Well, one thing I noticed, particularly in Ipanema, and there is another beach area north of there that is a bit more isolated, and I heard its similar. Anyways, you'd certainly see the more upper class educated abroad and everything else sub-set of Brazilians in those areas.

As Rio de Jainero is such a popular and beautiful city, I am sure there are a ton of other international families who'll also be attending the International Schools, etc.

Personally, I think it would be much more interesting for a teenage to rub shoulders with the kinds of people she'd meet and attend school with at an International School in Rio de Jainero, than whoever she'd be hanging out with in Houston.

Regarding Spanish to Portuguese. It's the opposite. Spanish-speakers will be EASILY understood by Brazilians, but you won't understand anything they say. Spanish is very phonetic and easy to pronounce and just simplistic. Brazilian-Portuguese has a ton of exceptions for pronouncing its words, lots of vowels thrown in, and some nasalized sounds on top of that.

I was in Brazil first, and later went to the Spanish-speaking countries of SOuth America..and felt everything I learned in Portuguese transferred over real quick. However, everyone who went the other way, was pining to get back to the Spanish-speaking countries, as they couldn't understand anything. However, Brazilians did understand their Spanish. There were a few Spanish words that had a completely different meaning in Portuguese though, and I do recall Brazilians talking about that and laughing at the misunderstandings because of that though.
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Old 07-26-2011, 10:26 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
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If you were single or married with no children and none on the way, I'd vote Rio.

But since you have two children, I would say that you should choose Houston.

You, the wife, and the children would have to learn Portuguese, re-learn the customs and what not to do, you would be at risk of kidnapping / ransoms, and I've heard some pretty weird stories about law enforcement in that city. There was one time a friend of mine came back from Rio and he was near the beach all the time, but still witnessed a shooting. BETWEEN TWO COPS! One cop was undercover, trying to stake out a drug kingpin, and the other was tailing the plainclothes cop. Well, the plainclothesman tried to tell the cop off but ended up pissing off the cop, and the cop shot the plainclothesman in the chest. Luckily, the plainclothesman was wearing a bulletproof vest, but it was a close call.

He asked the locals whether that was common. "Yes, it is common, the shootings."



And they chose RIO over Chicago for the Olympics? Wow. Just wow. No way in hell I'd go to Rio over Houston.
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Old 07-26-2011, 10:42 PM
 
6,349 posts, read 8,392,940 times
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Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
If you were single or married with no children and none on the way, I'd vote Rio.

But since you have two children, I would say that you should choose Houston.

You, the wife, and the children would have to learn Portuguese, re-learn the customs and what not to do, you would be at risk of kidnapping / ransoms, and I've heard some pretty weird stories about law enforcement in that city. There was one time a friend of mine came back from Rio and he was near the beach all the time, but still witnessed a shooting. BETWEEN TWO COPS! One cop was undercover, trying to stake out a drug kingpin, and the other was tailing the plainclothes cop. Well, the plainclothesman tried to tell the cop off but ended up pissing off the cop, and the cop shot the plainclothesman in the chest. Luckily, the plainclothesman was wearing a bulletproof vest, but it was a close call.

He asked the locals whether that was common. "Yes, it is common, the shootings."



And they chose RIO over Chicago for the Olympics? Wow. Just wow. No way in hell I'd go to Rio over Houston.


Go to Rio before you bash it like this.

Shootings at the beach are very rare.

Brasil isnt Mexico. Kidnappings with ransom are very rare. There have been cases of people being abducted and forced to go to an ATM machine to empty out their wallets, but actual ransoms? They have also been declining in recent years.

Brasil has arrested over 100 corrupt officers this year. They are making a big attempt to clean the city up for the Olympics and the World Cup. Even before that the crime rate was dropping. Now is the time to go to Rio, and in the coming years it is going to get even safer.

Learning another language is not a bad thing. There kids will be better off for it. Also many Brazilians, especially in Rio speak english. Customs?!? This is Brasil not Saudi Arabia. There are cultural differences but they arent huge. In fact most of them are positive.

If you had been to Rio, or Brasil, you would see why it won the Olympics. It is not some 3rd world hellhole. It is a beautiful country that is growing much faster than the US, Canada, or Western Europe. The people are wonderful. It is a great place.

I do agree with you about one thing though. It is better to be single in Brasil. Brasilian women are the best. My wife is one.
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Old 07-27-2011, 12:08 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
Learning another language is not a bad thing. There kids will be better off for it. Also many Brazilians, especially in Rio speak english. Customs?!? This is Brasil not Saudi Arabia. There are cultural differences but they arent huge. In fact most of them are positive.
I see the cultural differences of Brazil being mostly positive as well.

I'd think that Texas would have just as much of a cultural shock to L.A. kids even with the same language.

But, mostly the OP's kids will be in International Schools, which are top notch education, and will have classmates with all the other types of international bigwigs and embassy types.

I actually think the kids will rub elbows with much more interesting kids and peers in Rio de Janeiro International Schools than whatever elite Houston families send their kids to private schools there.
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Old 07-27-2011, 08:59 AM
 
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Its funny; but, I always said I would never move the family to Dubai or Abu Dhabi. Rio was never even a consideration until recently. My daughter and her mother have too much of the quote un quote LA Valley girl mentality to survive in the UAE. I think Rio will fit our family well for the next few years. After 22 yrs in the LA area, I feel Rio will be a breath of fresh air for our family. I will still have to travel to Dubai and Abu Dhabi from time to time; nevertheless, I feel the move will give me move family time. I hope the kids will also get an international view of what the world is like.
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Old 07-27-2011, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Denver
6,628 posts, read 12,508,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
In Brasil people dont stop at some traffic lights at night either. In Rio Grande Do Sul you are allowed to run a red light if no car is coming.
hahha I remember going out with my girlfriend and her friend (both from São Paulo) and we were coming back from Boston at like 3:30 in the morning. We were in a quiet little suburb, and we were approaching a red light--quickly! To my horror, my girlfriend's friend saw no one was coming and floored it through the red light. The Americans in the car flipped out, while my girlfriend and the driver turned back to us and said "It's night! Are you crazy? You cannot stop at a red light!".

Hilarious/Terrifying.

Last edited by tmac9wr; 07-27-2011 at 04:10 PM..
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Old 07-27-2011, 03:41 PM
 
2,065 posts, read 4,179,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmac9wr View Post
hahha I remember going out with my girlfriend and her friend (both from São Paulo) and we were coming back from Boston at like 3:30 in the morning. We were in a quiet little suburb, and we were approaching a red light--quickly! To my horror, my girlfriend's friend saw no one was coming and floored it through the red light. The American's in the car flipped out, while my girlfriend and the driver turned back to us and said "It's night! Are you crazy? You cannot stop at a red light!".

Hilarious/Terrifying.
...
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Old 07-27-2011, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
2,566 posts, read 4,653,986 times
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I don't stop at traffic lights after 10 pm, and I don't think it's so terrifying. It's just a preventive measure.

If you think that not stoping at traffic lights after 10 pm is something so terrifying, that will have such a great influence on your life, stay in the US, or go live in some small Brazilian town with less than 200,000 inhabitants.
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Old 07-27-2011, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Denver
6,628 posts, read 12,508,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
I don't stop at traffic lights after 10 pm, and I don't think it's so terrifying. It's just a preventive measure.

If you think that not stoping at traffic lights after 10 pm is something so terrifying, that will have such a great influence on your life, stay in the US, or go live in some small Brazilian town with less than 200,000 inhabitants.
I'm not saying it's "terrifying" that you can't stop at a red light after 10pm...I don't have a problem with that.

But it is terrifying when you're with friends in a car, and the driver speeds through a red light when you're not expecting it haha.

By the way, I'm moving to São Paulo in two months...so I need to get used to driving through red lights
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