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Old 08-10-2011, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Olympus Mons, Mars
5,681 posts, read 8,594,408 times
Reputation: 5778

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I got conversational in Spanish when I was in Ecuador. I was speaking well and could understand a great amount of what was said to me. I felt confident and was really happy that my great efforts at learning the language had paid off Then I went to Perú and it was no different, everything was fine. Same with Bolivia, no problems at all.

Then I went to Chile and I had a VERY difficult time understanding anything they were saying to me. It seemed they were speaking an entirely different language EXCEPT a few people who spoke with a much clearer accent and I could follow them but the vast majority...entendi nada! Here in Argentina although I can pickup a lot more than in Chile it's still a bit off. What is funny is that they can perfectly understand me but I cannot understand them at all...they just mumble everything I just cannot follow. In Chile I could very barely make out that it is even Spanish they are speaking.

Then I met a Colombian tourist here in Argentina and he was speaking so clearly I could again understand everything.

What is it about Chilean spanish that is making it so difficult to follow? Any ideas how to resolve this situation?
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Old 08-10-2011, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
92 posts, read 121,741 times
Reputation: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by k374 View Post
I got conversational in Spanish when I was in Ecuador. I was speaking well and could understand a great amount of what was said to me. I felt confident and was really happy that my great efforts at learning the language had paid off Then I went to Perú and it was no different, everything was fine. Same with Bolivia, no problems at all.

Then I went to Chile and I had a VERY difficult time understanding anything they were saying to me. It seemed they were speaking an entirely different language EXCEPT a few people who spoke with a much clearer accent and I could follow them but the vast majority...entendi nada! Here in Argentina although I can pickup a lot more than in Chile it's still a bit off. What is funny is that they can perfectly understand me but I cannot understand them at all...they just mumble everything I just cannot follow. In Chile I could very barely make out that it is even Spanish they are speaking.

Then I met a Colombian tourist here in Argentina and he was speaking so clearly I could again understand everything.

What is it about Chilean spanish that is making it so difficult to follow? Any ideas how to resolve this situation?
Argentina, Chile and Uruguay have a different accent than the rest of Latin American. I consider their accent to be very cute. Your ears need more practice with Spanish, because Spanish unlike English is the same everywhere.
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Old 08-10-2011, 06:47 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,165,304 times
Reputation: 11619
Quote:
Originally Posted by k374 View Post
I got conversational in Spanish when I was in Ecuador. I was speaking well and could understand a great amount of what was said to me. I felt confident and was really happy that my great efforts at learning the language had paid off Then I went to Perú and it was no different, everything was fine. Same with Bolivia, no problems at all.

Then I went to Chile and I had a VERY difficult time understanding anything they were saying to me. It seemed they were speaking an entirely different language EXCEPT a few people who spoke with a much clearer accent and I could follow them but the vast majority...entendi nada! Here in Argentina although I can pickup a lot more than in Chile it's still a bit off. What is funny is that they can perfectly understand me but I cannot understand them at all...they just mumble everything I just cannot follow. In Chile I could very barely make out that it is even Spanish they are speaking.

Then I met a Colombian tourist here in Argentina and he was speaking so clearly I could again understand everything.

What is it about Chilean spanish that is making it so difficult to follow? Any ideas how to resolve this situation?
Only way to resolve this is to keep conversing with people from Chile and watch Chilean videos, movies, and TV., preferably TV. Don't feel too bad. I'm a native Spanish speaker and I sometimes have a little difficulty understanding all of Chilean Spanish.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ezequiel View Post
Argentina, Chile and Uruguay have a different accent than the rest of Latin American. I consider their accent to be very cute. Your ears need more practice with Spanish, because Spanish unlike English is the same everywhere.
Spanish is not the same everywhere. Each country has its own slang. There's 3 kinds of Spanish. Castilian Spanish spoken in Spain (uses all 6 verb forms), Latin American Spanish (uses 5 verb forms) and Ríoplatense (spoken in Argentina and Uruguay and they conjugate some verb forms differently). All Spanish words, except some Ríoplatense words, are spelled the same way.
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Old 08-11-2011, 01:34 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
311 posts, read 742,042 times
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Rioplatense Spanish is its own peculiar dialect. For instance, they practice "vosismo" (they say vos instead of tu for the familiar "you" form), pronounce ll similar to a French j (calle becomes cazhe), and other peculiarities. Also, due to emigration, there is a heavy Italian influence on some dialects, particularly in Buenos Aires. There's also an interesting local dialect called lunfardo, but that's not the sort of thing you would commonly encounter as a foreigner.
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Old 08-11-2011, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,241,442 times
Reputation: 36087
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ezequiel View Post
Argentina, Chile and Uruguay have a different accent than the rest of Latin American. I consider their accent to be very cute. Your ears need more practice with Spanish, because Spanish unlike English is the same everywhere.
No, it isn't. There are Chileans who can't understand each other, because even within Chile, the accent is so varied. If you think English is not the same everywhere, maybe it's your ears that need more practice.
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Old 06-17-2012, 09:31 PM
 
775 posts, read 993,720 times
Reputation: 1444
Argentinian Spanish is difficult to understand at first. They don't even speak that fast, but the mumble a lot, especially the men. I think is sounds pretty though. It's actually my favorite Spanish accent.
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Old 06-18-2012, 05:09 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,241,442 times
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I lived for a year in a little fishing town in Chile, and even people from Santiago couldn't understand the local accent there.
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Old 06-18-2012, 06:23 AM
 
32,071 posts, read 32,968,461 times
Reputation: 14950
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post

Spanish is not the same everywhere. Each country has its own slang. There's 3 kinds of Spanish. Castilian Spanish spoken in Spain (uses all 6 verb forms), Latin American Spanish (uses 5 verb forms) and Ríoplatense (spoken in Argentina and Uruguay and they conjugate some verb forms differently). All Spanish words, except some Ríoplatense words, are spelled the same way.
Spanish like English is slightly different in each different country that it is spoken and that includes the different accents, different slang and sometimes slightly different grammar.
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Old 06-18-2012, 11:15 AM
 
546 posts, read 1,220,473 times
Reputation: 375
Quote:
Originally Posted by k374 View Post
I got conversational in Spanish when I was in Ecuador. I was speaking well and could understand a great amount of what was said to me. I felt confident and was really happy that my great efforts at learning the language had paid off Then I went to Perú and it was no different, everything was fine. Same with Bolivia, no problems at all.

Then I went to Chile and I had a VERY difficult time understanding anything they were saying to me. It seemed they were speaking an entirely different language EXCEPT a few people who spoke with a much clearer accent and I could follow them but the vast majority...entendi nada! Here in Argentina although I can pickup a lot more than in Chile it's still a bit off. What is funny is that they can perfectly understand me but I cannot understand them at all...they just mumble everything I just cannot follow. In Chile I could very barely make out that it is even Spanish they are speaking.

Then I met a Colombian tourist here in Argentina and he was speaking so clearly I could again understand everything.

What is it about Chilean spanish that is making it so difficult to follow? Any ideas how to resolve this situation?

Are you sure you were not in a Mapuche settlement?
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Old 06-21-2012, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
2,898 posts, read 5,114,285 times
Reputation: 2167
I'm originally from Chile and I can tell you that when I speak to other Latin Americans here in the U.S., I really have to focus and try to use my best standard Spanish for them to understand me. If I don't, they just stare at me with a puzzled look in their faces.
Chilean spanish is convoluted with colloquialisms and slang that constantly changes.
Here's a few things where Chilean Spanish differs from other versions of Spanish.

* Word- and syllable-final (S) is aspirated or lost entirely in most cases.

* Ending of many words is (i) instead of (s).
example; Como estas? => Como estai?

*Voseo (vos); is used very similarly as in Argentina BUT the (S) at the end is mostly words is aspirated or lost.
Example; Vo' sabi (tu sabes), vo' venis (Tu vienes) and so on.

The list is way longer, but it's all out there on the internet.

Lastly, I'd say that Chileans speak slightly faster than their neighbors which makes it even harder for somebody not used to it to understand.
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