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Old 08-19-2011, 01:58 PM
 
Location: West Coast
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What is the best country? What country is more likely to hire an American with a B.A. in Speech Communication, fifteen years of teaching experience, and pursing a Masters degree in Adult Education? I am interested in teaching Busines English, or College students. Also, would an American of color get beyond the photo screening that is usually required for most ESL positions? Thanks.
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Old 08-19-2011, 04:59 PM
 
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I know that an American with a M.A. in TESOL can get ESL/EFL teaching job at the university level in Ecuador. With just a B.A. one can get a ESL/EFL teaching job for lower pay at language schools in Ecuador.
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Old 08-19-2011, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Argentina.

Specially Buenos Aires.
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Old 08-20-2011, 04:15 PM
 
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I think Chile might be ok, because I believe the work permits are easier for the schools to get. Same in Uruguay I believe. Here in Brazil the work permit is very difficult and most schools or universities won't go through the hassle. As far as being a person of color, I think your being American, much of the time, cancels that out. I think this type of discrimination against black americans happens more in Korea.
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Old 08-20-2011, 07:26 PM
 
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I don't know what's required to get work permits in Chile but you could get a decent position in several private schools (I wouldn't do public).

The Masters would give you a chance in college, but there are two problems there: the academic community, specially for ELS, is very small and networking is very important to have a real opportunity. The other problem is that this year has been awful. High school and university students have been on strike trying to get "free education". Maybe on a private university, where you'll depend a lot on the student's opinions (surveys and evaluations at the end of each semester) to keep your position.

You can also try those ESL institutes, but you'd have to work a lot to get a good salary. Some of them even hire ESL students from the local universities because it's cheaper. College instructors use these places as 2nd jobs.

Curricula require photographs, but I don't think you'd be discriminated at all. You're American, "period". People coming from English-speaking countries are well considered.

Good luck!

Last edited by DFWgal; 08-20-2011 at 08:01 PM..
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Old 08-20-2011, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Macao
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I taught in Brazil for six months - you can find esl work, but work visa stuff is almost impossible. Usually people teach there illegally on a tourist visa. It's also very low pay.

I also traveled around most of the Spanish-speaking countries, and they all have esl work. You just don't see them posting online advertising for them. Usually you have to be in-country and look around. None of them pay very well though.

I don't know what your experience would be racially, but I'd think your passport and native speaker credentials would speak volumes. South America is a bit more 'racist' in the workplace than the U.S. - but I don't think it applies to Americans at all.

Also, I'm not sure about a photo screening, are you seeing positions posted online? Chile is the one country that I know that actually does try to recruit abroad - as I was there physically in person, and was having a hard time getting employed to teach, because I was in-country and not back in the U.S. Everywhere else in South America, I had to be in-country to even be aware of job opportunities in their country.

If I were black though, I'd probably put Chile and Argentina at the bottom of the list, mostly because there are so very few black people in those countries. Well, unless you are looking for that. Not sure what you're looking for exactly. But if I were black, I'd be going for Brazil all the way. But, having taught there, work visas are the major problem. I wasn't able to get one, all illegal teaching for me on a tourist visa there.
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Old 08-20-2011, 10:27 PM
 
Location: West Coast
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Thanks to all for responding. I have been researching ESL teaching sites and forums to get a sense of the experience. Many focus on teaching in Asia, due to the huge demand. There is a general view about the hiring policies in many Asian countries. It is not impossible for people of color to get hired, but it is quite difficult. I initially though some of the people were just being negative, but upon reading post after post of the similar experience, I realized that it was true. This is why I wondered if South American countries had a similar preference in regard to the person teaching them English. It wouldn't stop me from applying, but I would prefer to go in knowing what to expect. My education and teaching experience stand on their own, but people are particular about certain things. In any case, I will look into Argentina, Chile, and Brazil.
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Old 08-20-2011, 11:32 PM
 
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I disagree a bit with Tiger Beer. Chilean people are more classist rather than racist, precisely because population is so homogeneous. If the OP has a good job and manages to live in a decent neighborhood, he'll do fine. What's really needed is street smartness to survive there, but that applies to everyone.

If the OP goes to church, a good idea could be to contact people of his/her faith in the countries of interest to get a better idea from an American perspective.
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Old 08-21-2011, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joy74 View Post
Thanks to all for responding. I have been researching ESL teaching sites and forums to get a sense of the experience. Many focus on teaching in Asia, due to the huge demand. There is a general view about the hiring policies in many Asian countries. It is not impossible for people of color to get hired, but it is quite difficult. I initially though some of the people were just being negative, but upon reading post after post of the similar experience, I realized that it was true. This is why I wondered if South American countries had a similar preference in regard to the person teaching them English. It wouldn't stop me from applying, but I would prefer to go in knowing what to expect. My education and teaching experience stand on their own, but people are particular about certain things. In any case, I will look into Argentina, Chile, and Brazil.
I've lived in South Korea and Japan for many years. It's true that there aren't a lot of 'people of color' teaching here, but there are definitely some! They are 100% here!

I've taught with a few at the university level as co-workers, in both Japan and South Korea. My African-American co-worker right now is from Miami, and the one I taught with in Seoul was from San Francisco.

They definitely exist. But, it's true that it can be a bit more difficult, or so I've heard. But they are here.

I think where it gets most difficult is for the barely qualified. Many language institutes in Korea/Japan are looking for the 22-year-old fresh-from-college with 'the American look' - and they basically work the hell out of them, as they are quite naive and have very little experience.

Once you get beyond that stage, and you are a bit more qualified, and can start applying for more serious jobs in Japan/Korea, than it opens up the door quite a bit. The more serious jobs are looking for experience and qualifications.

Actually I think that African-Americans have an advantage over other Asians - like a Chinese-American trying to get a uni job in Japan or Korea is almost impossible. Whereas you'll see the African-American as everyone knows he's a native speaker.
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Old 08-21-2011, 03:21 PM
 
Location: West Coast
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According to my research, it is true about Asian-Americans teaching in Asia. There is a prejudice. They are not considered native English speakers, even if they were born and raised in English speaking countries. On one forum, a Chinese-American posted about going to China to teach English. She was excited to go to to the birthplace of of parents. She was stunned by how she was treated there. She found it almost impossible to get a teaching job. The parents did not want her English to their children. The schools would not hire her for fear of losing students. I'm certain that if she was in another profession, working in China would have been a cakewalk, as she was also fluent in Mandarin. Her passion was teaching, and English was what she wanted to teach. She finally got a position, but it took much much longer than she expected it to.
It is the law of supply and demand. The demand overcame ignorance. I have no interest in teaching in Asia at all. My preference is South America. Initially wanted to teach in Spain, but that is not an option for Americans. Argentina would problably be ideal, as long as I could work there legally. I will not live or work in another country illegally under any circumstance.
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