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Old 11-13-2011, 11:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
On another note, connecting this back to Brazil. There are a ton of Brazilians (and Peruvians) in Japan. I've easily met 100s and 100s, especially whenever I visit Nagoya. Up in that area, many of the subway signs are not only in Japanese and English, but also in Portuguese.
Any good Peruvian restaurants in Japan?
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Old 11-13-2011, 11:59 PM
 
Location: Macao
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Originally Posted by califantastic View Post
Any good Peruvian restaurants in Japan?
I've never seen good Peruvian restaurants anywhere, not even in the U.S.
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Old 11-14-2011, 12:25 AM
 
Location: In the heights
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I've never seen good Peruvian restaurants anywhere, not even in the U.S.
New York has them, and has a lot. Come on by, I'll show you around. Unless that was an awesome way of saying no Peruvian restaurant is a good Peruvian restaurant which I'd disagree with, but would enjoy the way you stated it.
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Old 11-14-2011, 12:31 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
New York has them, and has a lot. Come on by, I'll show you around. Unless that was an awesome way of saying no Peruvian restaurant is a good Peruvian restaurant which I'd disagree with, but would enjoy the way you stated it.
I lived in NYC back in 1998-2000....I can't recall seeing them. I can't recall seeing hardly any South American cuisines, except for expensive Brazilian Churasco or Argentine steakhouses.

I did spend a month in Peru though, I mostly remember 'beefstek con arros' - beef and rice, usually with french fries. Also chicken, rice, and french fries.

I quite liked the taste...but outside of that, I can't recall anything else I'd think of typical Peruvian cuisine.
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Old 11-14-2011, 12:31 AM
 
Location: In the heights
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Originally Posted by Glucorious View Post
The statistics I saw said Japan is 98.5% Japanese, and a couple of Chinese and Koreans. Not sure where you see all those non-Japanese. About 200 000 Brazilians of Japanese decent supposedly moved there in the 90's. Only 15 000 naturalizations each year. It's a homogeneous country. They also had a documentary on CNN once where they talked about this. don't think it's much of a "stereotype". And the NY Times had a few articles about this, too. Besides, I have had many people telling me this ( who have been there ). I am also frequently told you're gonna be popular if you are white. Or at least they will treat you better. And I just looked it up - their net migration rate is "0 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2011 est.)".
They just hurt themselves. They need immigrants desperately, actually. Just throwing this in here because Japan is a good example what happens when you are anti-immigrant. Sometimes, you just don't have any other choice but to open up the country for immigrants. Brazil actually has a negative net migration rate. Apparently, they don't attract almost no South Americans. I can't find much on immigration to Brazil, though. It seems like there's barely any immigration? Wonder why. Especially from poorer South American countries. At least their birth rate is decent. Good for them. That's what seems to be compensation for the lack of immigrants.

Off-topic. Sorry.
On top of what he's already said, his statistics and yours don't have to be off from each other. There's a fairly small younger population (and a very large older population) and those would be the ones that would presumably be getting married.

There are a lot of devils in the details it seems. I also don't think a country should have to have population growth to be a good country. Actually, I think it'd probably be good for a lot of countries to do more to stem population growth and try to give better services for those who around. It's not as if manual labor is in incredibly high demand these days.
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Old 11-14-2011, 12:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Glucorious View Post
At least their birth rate is decent. Good for them. That's what seems to be compensation for the lack of immigrants.

.
Yes. Brazil's fertility rate is now just 1.9 children per woman. This is attributed to several factors: 1) Brazil's rapid industrialization, lessening the need for child agrarian labor. 2) easy legal access to birth-control pills and devices, without prescription. 3) declining infant and child mortality rates due to public health initiatives. 4) government financial incentives for performing C-sections, with tubal ligations tacked on. 4) immensely popular telenovelas (soap operas) featuring glamorous middle-class, independent female characters as role models. Read National Geographic magazine's Sept. 2011 article on this subject nationgeographic.com - nation geographic Resources and Information. The New York Times has also written about Brazil's phenomenon.
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Old 11-14-2011, 11:59 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I lived in NYC back in 1998-2000....I can't recall seeing them. I can't recall seeing hardly any South American cuisines, except for expensive Brazilian Churasco or Argentine steakhouses.

I did spend a month in Peru though, I mostly remember 'beefstek con arros' - beef and rice, usually with french fries. Also chicken, rice, and french fries.

I quite liked the taste...but outside of that, I can't recall anything else I'd think of typical Peruvian cuisine.
Well, the Peruvians in New York are mostly out in Queens or New Jersey, so maybe you didn't head there. South American food isn't super common in Manhattan, but the outer boroughs definitely has a good deal of Colombian, Peruvian, and a few other cuisines.

When I think Peruvian food, I think of rotisseries chicken with green sauce, chaufa (the Peruvian descendent of Chinese fried rice which I like more than the original), inka cola (ick), and really good ceviche.
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Old 11-16-2011, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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Originally Posted by nesne View Post
Brazil has been an immigrant country since 1808 when the it became head of the Portuguese empire. Before then it had been a closed colony where almost all immigration came from Portugal. Immigration has ebbed and flowed during that time. Immigration mostly stopped in about the 1970s although there are still a lot of old people who are first generation. I would say in my building about 20 percent of the people are portuguese immigrants. Either directly from Portugal or those who left Africa during de-colonization. Basically most of the old people in my building have funny Portuguese accents. But I live in a neighborhood that was traditionally portuguese and spanish. In the last few years we have seen a lot more immigrants here in Rio. Many more non-japanese asian, african, and bolivian. Of course the levels here don't come close to what they are in Sao Paulo and the level of immigrants in Sao Paulo doesn't even come close to what it is in the US, Canada, or some parts of Europe.

Immigration to Brazil almost stoped in the late 1920's, with the worldwide Great Depression and the Revolution of Getulio Vargas in 1930.

In the late 1940's, after the end of the World War II, a few more Japanese immigrants have come to Brazil.

In general, the immigration to Brazil stoped in the late 1940's for the Japanese, and in the late 1920's for the other nationalities.

Since the 1950's the flow reversed, and Brazil became an "exporter" of people.

Now, in the past couple years, the flow is reversing again, and Brazil is slowly turning back to be a "net importer" of immigrants.
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Old 11-16-2011, 01:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Immigration to Brazil almost stoped in the late 1920's, with the worldwide Great Depression and the Revolution of Getulio Vargas in 1930.

In the late 1940's, after the end of the World War II, a few more Japanese immigrants have come to Brazil.

In general, the immigration to Brazil stoped in the late 1940's for the Japanese, and in the late 1920's for the other nationalities.

Since the 1950's the flow reversed, and Brazil became an "exporter" of people.

Now, in the past couple years, the flow is reversing again, and Brazil is slowly turning back to be a "net importer" of immigrants.
I mostly agree with what you are saying except the Portuguese kept coming until later than the 1930s. Not in huge numbers but enough that in the larger cities in the South East it is very easy to find first generation immigrants. Granted they are mostly older. Usually around 60 year old at the minimum. Brazil never had the number of immigrants that the US or Argentina had anyways. It was significant but not overwhelming. Immigration to Brazil - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia In addition, I am not sure if Brazil became a net exporter of people until the 1990s. I may be mistaken, and am too lazy to research it right now, but one of the things I remember distinctly talking about in a Brazilian studies class at University in the early 1990s was the surprising statistic that even though the Brazilian economy had been crappy for many years it had not become a net exporter of people. That most people still had hopes for the future of the country. Of course in the 1990s Brazilians did start to leave the country but relative to its population size not many have left. I am always surprised how the Brazilian media portrays Brazil as if it were sending a lot of workers to the developed world and was supplying a lot of labor. Statistically Brazilians immigrants are a very small part of the labor force in countries such as the US. And when peope think of manual laborers Brazilians certainly don't come to mind, except for maybe in Framingham, MA or Miami FL.
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Old 11-16-2011, 04:10 PM
 
Location: American Expat
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I see them, as I'm a foreigner in Japan myself, and very much a part of the foreigner community. I know a black american guy, married to a filipina woman, who have 5 kids, and they were granted Japanese citizenship.

Usually, people just get 'permanant residency', or the right to buy and sell land, work wherever, on and on.

Regarding foreigners. Looking at the Catholic Churches here, you can regularly see Filipino masses one weekend, Portuguese the next, etc. You'll see the churches completely filled with Brazilians or Filipinos or whoever is the designated group.

I guess, the main thing I'm trying to say, is foreigners are here in Japan. I see them everyday, everywhere. Nowhere like you see in New York City, but certainly not non-existant, as the western media seems to always portray.


98.5% ethnic Japanese is what it is. It's 98.5%.


I've also spent a lot of time in quite a few other countries, and see much more long-term residents living in Japan than anywhere else in Asia, by far, outside of Thailand perhaps. I just noticed that the West continously targets 'Japan' and 'only Japan'. But you never see them targeting Turkey, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, etc., about becoming immigrant countries.

Because they aren't as wealthy as Japan. I guess most people simply don't care about them. Especially since Japan is a major economy.

Actually there are very very very few countries I can emigrate to in this world, mostly only in the Americas and Australia/New Zealand. But, I regularly hear this complaint that Japan/Japanese are racist, as they aren't immigrant countries like US, Canada, Brazil, etc. Yet, everywhere else that isn't an immigrant country, people never claim it's because 'Turkish are racist', or whatever nation it is.

Well, maybe it's because they are? And people have different expectations.. nobody expects the same from Turkey and Japan.. Poor nations are always more backwards. Also, I was told by many people ( All Asians ) that as a white person you have it easier there. So that would explain why you haven't noticed much. I've read so many articles about this - kicking out foreigners, people having to sue because they refused to rent to non-Japanese, only issuing permanent visas to people of Japanese descent ( particularly from Brazil )from Brazil etc. etc. there are really so many things you could list.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20071110f1.html

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/fl20081230zg.html

I've also never understood why Japan is SUPPOSE to be constantly growing it's population. Sure, it's great for the older generation to get benefits. But long-term, should our overall goal really be to continually expand every population on the planet by leaps and bounds, decade by decade? At some point, we're ALL going to have downsize. We can't all excessively expand our populations for all time.

Because if it does not, you have too many old people using the health insurance, social security etc. It will eventually collapse. And who wants an old population? The youth is the future of every country.


Back on topic. Brazil. It's an immigrant country, so I love to see people moving in, rather than moving out.
Well, apparently nobody is moving in.
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