U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: How do you view Dominicans?
Strictly Latin American. 40 33.61%
Afro-Latino 65 54.62%
Strictly Afro-Caribbean. 14 11.76%
Voters: 119. You may not vote on this poll

Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 03-28-2014, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
9,845 posts, read 22,208,117 times
Reputation: 3543

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by lexdiamondz1902 View Post
Not really, among the poor and working class is where most traditional culture survives and that tends to differ most even within the same country, never mind between countries.



You're missing the point. The fact that a significant portion of the population speaks Spanish as a second language makes them in many ways fundamentally different. And to say that there is very little indigenous cultural influence is misleading when a great deal of the food, music and superstitions/beliefs/traditions are influenced by indigenous cultures.



Again, not really true. Coastal regions are generally tropical, but inland is a completely different story. Most of Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia and Paraguay are mountainous highlands, while huge parts of Mexico are covered in desert and Argentina, Chile and Uruguay are more temperate. So please explain to me how the wine-growing regions of Chile have anything to do with the canefields of DR.
DR has similarities with Coastal Colombia and also with Venezuela. To say otherwise is pretty silly.

 
Old 03-28-2014, 08:26 AM
 
695 posts, read 738,108 times
Reputation: 922
Quote:
Originally Posted by NooYowkur81 View Post
DR has similarities with Coastal Colombia and also with Venezuela. To say otherwise is pretty silly.
...and where did I say otherwise?
 
Old 03-28-2014, 04:18 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,944,296 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by CorderoAries View Post
.

Guyana doesn't touch the Caribbean sea yet people often include it with the Caribbean.

.
.

That is because Guyana is culturally an integral part of the Caribbean. People who pretend as if Caribbean is just a geographic term, and that there arent broad based connections between these various countries fool themselves.

Most of Caribbean culture grew out of interactions between various European and various African groups, operating within the context of a plantation culture. While there are variations, based on the histories of a particular country, there are similarities as well. Clearly other groups have made impact as well.

Indeed even societies located far from the Caribbean, Cape Verde, Mauritius and Seychelles, have broad similarities with the Caribbean, because there are many aspects of their histories and of the interactions between the various peoples which are similar.

This is not to say that the DR doesnt share something with Bolivia, but to suggest that it is culturally isolated from the non Hispanic Caribbean, maybe because its elites wish that it was, doesnt change the facts.

The DR is a Latin American country. It is an Afro Latin country, because many of its peoples derive culturally from an interaction of Africa and Spain, and it is also a Caribbean country, because it has certain cultural aspects in common with neighboring islands, inclusive of those which are French or English speaking.

I always use the example of Saturday afternoon, rice and peas with stewed chicken, plantain, root vegetables, bass heavy music and maybe dancing, and definitely a firey game of dominos. Which Caribbean country is it? Lets see how quickly almost every single Caribbean person raises their hands, regardless of their language.

I didnt answer the poll because it isnt either, or. Its ALL of the above. Different parts of the population may lean more one way, or the other, but I dont think that too many people arent some what impacted by all of it.
 
Old 03-28-2014, 04:39 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,944,296 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by nycjowww View Post
True. Also there are a lot of connections that the DR has with West Indian islands.

Went to Guadeloupe last summer and Dominicans were all over. I also spoke to this lady who lives in the Bronx and is from ST. Kitts. She has family in both the DR and back home and her family travels both.

You also want to add Bahamas, Turks and cacos to that list also.

And this is the point. Dominicans are definitely aware of their yannikekes, and their moko yombie dancing traditions. That came from St Kitts. The moko jumbies originating from the Igbos of south east Nigeria.

The grand kids of these original migrants are returning to their ancestral homes, bringing with them Dominican culture.

On a recent visit to St Kitts i heard lots of bachata in certain parts of the capital. In addition, because they are multi lingual (they speak Spanish, English and Kittitian dialect) they are important as guides to the cruise ship industry, especially in the summer when many of the passengers are Latin American.

Aside from limitations of language, Caribbean people can easily interact with each other, that is if they want to. Though some of us are trapped in some neo colonial thinking that there is this huge cultural chasm separating us.
 
Old 03-28-2014, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY $$$
6,836 posts, read 12,872,779 times
Reputation: 1587
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
And this is the point. Dominicans are definitely aware of their yannikekes, and their moko yombie dancing traditions. That came from St Kitts. The moko jumbies originating from the Igbos of south east Nigeria.

The grand kids of these original migrants are returning to their ancestral homes, bringing with them Dominican culture.

On a recent visit to St Kitts i heard lots of bachata in certain parts of the capital. In addition, because they are multi lingual (they speak Spanish, English and Kittitian dialect) they are important as guides to the cruise ship industry, especially in the summer when many of the passengers are Latin American.

Aside from limitations of language, Caribbean people can easily interact with each other, that is if they want to. Though some of us are trapped in some neo colonial thinking that there is this huge cultural chasm separating us.
Your last paragraph holds a lot of truths for the West Indians living in Brooklyn.
 
Old 03-28-2014, 11:13 PM
 
695 posts, read 738,108 times
Reputation: 922
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
I always use the example of Saturday afternoon, rice and peas with stewed chicken, plantain, root vegetables, bass heavy music and maybe dancing, and definitely a firey game of dominos. Which Caribbean country is it? Lets see how quickly almost every single Caribbean person raises their hands, regardless of their language.
Thread done.
 
Old 03-28-2014, 11:22 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,944,296 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by nycjowww View Post
Your last paragraph holds a lot of truths for the West Indians living in Brooklyn.

Yes. I remember when I came 30 years ago people from the Anglophone Caribbean thought that Haitians were AIDs carriers, and treated them accordingly. I am not going to suggest that things are perfect but relationships have vastly improved. People did feel for Haiti in that earthquake.
 
Old 03-28-2014, 11:26 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,944,296 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by lexdiamondz1902 View Post
Thread done.

I learned this in Guadeloupe. I was staying with a family and the mother was offering me this French Antillean food. She didn't speak English and my French is too bad for any French speaker to tolerate it (they aren't as nice as Spanish speakers when their language is butchered).

Despite that we got on perfectly fine. We instinctively new the cultural clues, being Caribbean people.
Her niece and nephew spoke fluent English because they listened to Antiguan radio because they like R&B and in Guadeloupe in those days it was only zouk, soukous, and French music.

Of course no where in the Caribbean can one go too far without hearing music.
 
Old 03-28-2014, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY $$$
6,836 posts, read 12,872,779 times
Reputation: 1587
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
Yes. I remember when I came 30 years ago people from the Anglophone Caribbean thought that Haitians were AIDs carriers, and treated them accordingly. I am not going to suggest that things are perfect but relationships have vastly improved. People did feel for Haiti in that earthquake.
Yea all ignorance but luckily for me I was always the one to point out all the contradictions which always made people mad lol.

For the most part yes it has improved, most of the biggest Haitian haters I know have been in a relationship with a Haitian or having a relationship at the moment.
 
Old 03-28-2014, 11:33 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,944,296 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by nycjowww View Post
Yea all ignorance but luckily for me I was always the one to point out all the contradictions which always made people mad lol.

For the most part yes it has improved, most of the biggest Haitian haters I know have been in a relationship with a Haitian or having a relationship at the moment.

I guess your biggest point is your Revolution. Thanks to it, the British decided that slavery was too expensive because of the endless need to protect against slave rebellions, which really terrified them after you guys showed that at least one actually succeeded. Of course a bunch of rebellions in the 1820s also helped.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top