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View Poll Results: How do you view Dominicans?
Strictly Latin American. 40 33.61%
Afro-Latino 65 54.62%
Strictly Afro-Caribbean. 14 11.76%
Voters: 119. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-29-2014, 06:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
I learned this in Guadeloupe. I was staying with a family and the mother was offering me this French Antillean food. She didn't speak English and my French is too bad for any French speaker to tolerate it (they aren't as nice as Spanish speakers when their language is butchered).

Despite that we got on perfectly fine. We instinctively new the cultural clues, being Caribbean people.
Her niece and nephew spoke fluent English because they listened to Antiguan radio because they like R&B and in Guadeloupe in those days it was only zouk, soukous, and French music.

Of course no where in the Caribbean can one go too far without hearing music.
That's a uniquely antillais phenomenon though, because of the relationship between French and Creole people tend to jump on you real quick if your French is sub-par since it's perceived as a sign that you're not educated.

 
Old 03-29-2014, 06:51 AM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 12 days ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
And this is the point. Dominicans are definitely aware of their yannikekes, and their moko yombie dancing traditions. That came from St Kitts.
That's not my experience with Dominicans. Maybe in the areas of the DR where the cocolos settled, which is mostly in the southeastern part, there is awareness, but in most places not really and the southeastern part is the least populated region. Then again, most places in DR don't have much cocolo influence if any at all, because they didn't receive most of the cocolo migration. Its mostly a handful of towns along the southeastern coast.

Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny
On a recent visit to St Kitts i heard lots of bachata in certain parts of the capital.
You will hear Bachata in a lot of places in Latin America. In Honduras it has become practically the national music. The first and only time I went to Honduras was before I discovered the DR and I thought Bachata was Honduran. LOL

The same thing happens with Merengue (you will hear it everywhere from Mexico to Argentina and everywhere in between) and in Puerto Rico its practically the "national" music.

Cuban Son music was actually influenced by Dominican immigrants in Cuba during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny
In addition, because they are multi lingual (they speak Spanish, English and Kittitian dialect) they are important as guides to the cruise ship industry, especially in the summer when many of the passengers are Latin American.
Most Dominicans, though, are monolingual. For many its Spanish or the highway. The only places in the DR where you find native English speaking Dominicans is in parts of Samana and in the southeastern part of the country and even there its quite spotty.

Cocolo Dominicans probably make up 1% of the Dominican population. Its still a lot of people because that would be about 100,000 people; but considering the overall size of the Dominican population, they are quite a small minority that become relevant in a handful of places where their ancestors moved to in large numbers, such as San Pedro de Macoris. In most places cocolo Dominicans practically don't exist.

Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny
Aside from limitations of language, Caribbean people can easily interact with each other, that is if they want to.
That's the case with all of humanity.

Last edited by AntonioR; 03-29-2014 at 07:29 AM..
 
Old 03-29-2014, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Plantains are also commonly eaten through out tropical parts of Latin America, not just in the Caribbean.
 
Old 03-31-2014, 11:59 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,925,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lexdiamondz1902 View Post
That's a uniquely antillais phenomenon though, because of the relationship between French and Creole people tend to jump on you real quick if your French is sub-par since it's perceived as a sign that you're not educated.

No, its just that they would rather butcher our language than have us butcher theirs.

But who are we to talk. English speakers are very arrogant towards those who don't speak it well, even though even the worst speaker of English speaks it better than we are likely to speak their language.

I recall in Trinidad a Venezuelan waiter was trying to serve some Trini ladies. They didn't understand him and became indignant demanding to know whether he spoke English. Bet their Spanish is worse than his English. He also served my table and I didn't have a problem with him. Their impatience intimidated him, so he panicked.
 
Old 04-01-2014, 12:00 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Plantains are also commonly eaten through out tropical parts of Latin America, not just in the Caribbean.

In the example I gave a whole lot more was happening than just plantains.

Tell you what. Put on some music and you will see that Dominicanos will party more with the Trinis than with the Bolivians.
 
Old 04-01-2014, 12:08 AM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,925,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
That's not my experience with Dominicans. Maybe in the areas of the DR where the cocolos settled, which is mostly in the southeastern part, there is awareness, but in most places not really and the southeastern part is the least populated region. Then again, most places in DR don't have much cocolo influence if any at all, because they didn't receive most of the cocolo migration. Its mostly a handful of towns along the southeastern coast.


You will hear Bachata in a lot of places in Latin America. In Honduras it has become practically the national music. The first and only time I went to Honduras was before I discovered the DR and I thought Bachata was Honduran. LOL

The same thing happens with Merengue (you will hear it everywhere from Mexico to Argentina and everywhere in between) and in Puerto Rico its practically the "national" music.

Cuban Son music was actually influenced by Dominican immigrants in Cuba during the 18th and 19th centuries.


Most Dominicans, though, are monolingual. For many its Spanish or the highway. The only places in the DR where you find native English speaking Dominicans is in parts of Samana and in the southeastern part of the country and even there its quite spotty.

Cocolo Dominicans probably make up 1% of the Dominican population. Its still a lot of people because that would be about 100,000 people; but considering the overall size of the Dominican population, they are quite a small minority that become relevant in a handful of places where their ancestors moved to in large numbers, such as San Pedro de Macoris. In most places cocolo Dominicans practically don't exist.


That's the case with all of humanity.
the multlingual Dominicans I referred to were the Cocolos. Indeed I used them as an example of people who left the Anglophone Caribbean for the DR, bringing their culture with them, and then their grand kids returning to their ancestral homes, bringing Dominican influences. Given that no one other than Dominicans speak Spanish it is indeed more unusual to hear bachata there than in Mexico, wouldn't you think?

You have a vested interests in perpetrating the myth that every Latin American is a mestizo with next to no African influence so I will not waste my time arguing with you. Even though my point is that the DR is a cross section of being Latin American, AfroLatin, and Afro Caribbean, those points are lost on you because you become hysterical every time that dreaded African influence in anything Latin is raised. But its so obvious that those who deny it are being dishonest to themselves.

My points were about people sharing cultural traits ACROSS the barriers of language.

And no most people don't get on with each other across ethnic lines, so its a surprise when you find people who actually do.
 
Old 04-01-2014, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
9,845 posts, read 22,173,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
In the example I gave a whole lot more was happening than just plantains.

Tell you what. Put on some music and you will see that Dominicanos will party more with the Trinis than with the Bolivians.
Yes there are more similarities among the Caribbean countries than differences although almost universally people tend to focus on the differences.
 
Old 04-01-2014, 04:56 PM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 12 days ago)
 
5,170 posts, read 8,019,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
In the example I gave a whole lot more was happening than just plantains.

Tell you what. Put on some music and you will see that Dominicanos will party more with the Trinis than with the Bolivians.
Speaking of Bolivians, here they are singing and dancing some Dominican Merengue in Cochabamba, Bolivia:



A Bolivian band that does Dominican Bachata (by the way, maybe its just me, but the singer looks like Jackie Chan! LOL):



A Bolivian television program devoting an entire episode to all things Dominican and Bolivian:



Dominican and Bolivian friends dancing together to Dominican music:



Hundreds of Bolivians enjoying a concert by Dominican singer Juan Luis Guerra in Santa Cruz, Bolivia:



Hundreds of Bolivians singing and enjoying a concert by Dominican singer Prince Royce in Santa Cruz, Bolivia:



People from various Latin American countries protesting in favor of the Dominican government spending 4% of the country's GDP in the public education of the Dominican people:



Peruvian television focusing on three Peruvians that moved from Peru to Dominican Republic and are successful. Its this type of programs that causes migration waves:



I'm actually shocked how easy it is to find these videos and how plentiful they are. lol

This shouldn't be much of a shock though. All of Spanish America was one country (Spain) for at least 300 years. Spain herself considered them integral provinces of the kingdom according to the first Spanish Constitution of 1812, with all inhabitants being Spaniards regardless of race or color.

Last edited by AntonioR; 04-01-2014 at 05:43 PM..
 
Old 04-01-2014, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,433,356 times
Reputation: 3257
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
In the example I gave a whole lot more was happening than just plantains.

Tell you what. Put on some music and you will see that Dominicanos will party more with the Trinis than with the Bolivians.
I've been to plenty of Latin clubs I see Dominicans and alot of Latinos from every where else. But in the end Its the Domincans in the Rep Dom that count. I'm sure Dominicans artist do more tours in the rest of Latin America(including Bolivia) than they do in the English speaking Caribbean. And Many Artist from South AMerica and Central America also do shows in the Rep Dom. I believe cultural ties are growing stronger in Latin America and I think thats a great thing.



If the Rep. Dom was really close to the english speaking Caribbean why isn't it a full member of Caricom yet? But yet Rep Dominicana became a full member of Cafta no problem. It is also a member of the Central American integration system and even held the presidency of the Central American parliment PARLACEN.

Manolo Pichardo a jorunalist and distinguished politician from the Dominican Republic was the president of Parlacen. This video is in Spanish, but I wish it was in Englich so people could hear what he says about the caribbean and Central American region.




Heres a recent video during a reunion in Havana of the President of the Republica Dominincana giving Ralph Gonsalves, the prime minister of St Vincent and the grenadines a verbal thrashing for criticising them over Haitians in their country , basically for sticking his nose where it doesn't corespond.
 
Old 04-02-2014, 07:01 AM
 
695 posts, read 736,167 times
Reputation: 922
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
No, its just that they would rather butcher our language than have us butcher theirs.

But who are we to talk. English speakers are very arrogant towards those who don't speak it well, even though even the worst speaker of English speaks it better than we are likely to speak their language.

I recall in Trinidad a Venezuelan waiter was trying to serve some Trini ladies. They didn't understand him and became indignant demanding to know whether he spoke English. Bet their Spanish is worse than his English. He also served my table and I didn't have a problem with him. Their impatience intimidated him, so he panicked.
Na I disagree a bit. My mom lived in guadeloupe for a while (she's Haitian-Dominican) and I lived in montreal for a while growing up and they've got some deep complexes when it comes to language. Elsewhere in the francophone world people tend to appreciate speaking French even though they'll usually switch to english since as you said their english is likely better than our french.
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