U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: How do you view Dominicans?
Strictly Latin American. 40 33.61%
Afro-Latino 65 54.62%
Strictly Afro-Caribbean. 14 11.76%
Voters: 119. You may not vote on this poll

Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 01-03-2013, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Caribbean
7,558 posts, read 2,428,887 times
Reputation: 2738

Advertisements

St. Lucian Creole...

http://youtu.be/VBWdu64ya8E

Note the explanation below:
This is: Words of Life Creole: St. Lucia (kwyl) People/Language Movie Trailer c06611 [c06611t] Other names for this language are: Kwyl; Lesser Antillean Creole French; Patois; Patwa; St. Lucia; kwyl This language is spoken in: Saint Lucia; West Indies This movie concerns:...


Grenada - again, we are speaking about the language here "pale patwa"

http://youtu.be/EleqaCrO1Us

Grenada Creole Society performs their song at The Grenville Independence Extravaganza - 2010. It is a bilingual composition - English & Creole French. It exhorts the large crowd of Grenadians celebrating their independence to speak the language of their ancestors which used to be generally spoken, but which is now in decline. Using Afro-Caribbeam rythyms, drums and steel pan tones, it mentions that St. Lucia, Dominica, Martinique and Guadeloupe still speak the language.

Trinidad French Creole - again french creole is referring to the language.

http://youtu.be/BBExN29lI8Q

The Flavour of a Fading Creole is a short study of the last users of Trinidadian French-lexicon Creole, in the community of Paramin in Trinidad. We hear the language through the voices of its last remaining speakers, and get a taste of its culture through a presentation of Trinidadian French Creole cuisine, flavoured by the very seasoning grown by farmers in this agricultural community. The recordings were done by Nicole Scott who was seeking to research and describe this language before it disappeared.

And another, refering to the language as patois...

http://youtu.be/PHFvWG6vc7I

Last edited by ReineDeCoeur; 01-03-2013 at 08:05 PM..

 
Old 01-04-2013, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,258 posts, read 26,226,229 times
Reputation: 11716
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Actually, i would say the average middle class Guatemalan has much more in common with a middle class Dominican then a Haitien or a Jamaican would.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
I agree that someone in Guatemala would have more cultural ties or similarities in some ways to the Dominican Republic than a place like Jamaica or Martinique or Barbados.
I don't know about this. Even though Dominicans won't cop to being "black," there's still some concept of "blackness" and/or "Caribbeaness" that unites people of African descent in the Caribbean. That's why you see a lot of Haitians and Dominicans on Labor Day even though carnival is technically for "West Indians" (the British ones). I really don't think Dominicans or Puerto Ricans see themselves as having much in common with Central Americans at all (other than a common tongue). At the end of the day, most Dominicans are black people, and I think this is reflected in the social and relationship patterns you see in NYC.
 
Old 01-04-2013, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,258 posts, read 26,226,229 times
Reputation: 11716
This is an interesting question. I was raised in the northeast and also went to school here and these are my observations:

-In student affinity groups (BSAs, SNMA, BLSA, NSBE, etc.), Dominicans are more likely to participate in "black" groups rather than Latino ones, which were dominated by Mexicans and Central Americans.

-More dating between Dominicans and AAs or West Indians than between Dominicans and/or Mexican Central Americans.

-More socialization in general with people of African descent than Mexican and/or Central Americans

-Dominicans, in my experience, routinely drop the "N" bomb in front of black friends (putting aside for a moment the wisdom, or lack thereof, of using the word at all). I think most black people who have a problem with a Guatemalan friend doing the same. Compare Fat Joe (yes, I know he's Rican, but just sayin').

Maybe this is just a function of living in the Northeast. What are your observations?
 
Old 01-05-2013, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Boston
701 posts, read 1,270,827 times
Reputation: 1021
I personally agree with your observations, BajanYankee, and I grew up in the South. Here, Dominicans are far and few in between, but there are plenty of Mexicans, Salvadorans, Hondurans, and the like and I distinctly remember joining a Latin American group during college only to be the *only* dark-skinned person there. While my best friend and second closest friends are Mexican, growing up I found myself socially getting on with AAs more than other Latinos. That dynamic didn't shift to equally getting along with both until around high school. Before I became more settled with my identity, I rarely talked about being Dominican (not out of embarrassment, but out of confusion over being a mixed black kid), so other Hispanic kids didn't know I was kind of like them.

In my family, your observation holds true, as well. I'm half-AA as well as many of my older and younger cousins. A few have dated/married other races and ethnicities like Filipino and White, but my generation of the family is mainly mixed with AA at this point.

But, this is not to say that AAs and Dominicans get along very well because in my experience, I would argue the opposite. One of the reasons I began to proudly say, "Yes, I am a Black Latina" was because I started to encounter people who refused to accept that I was black. I was routinely questioned about the "other half" which made me seem different. Dominicans do not fit the standard of blackness for many AA folk. I get along very well with Haitians, other black Caribbean folk, as well as Africans, but AAs can be a toss up depending on their own personal concept of blackness.

(Just realized that my experiences are kind of conflicting, but Dominican and AA relations aren't an even road of acceptance and understanding, imo)
 
Old 01-06-2013, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,258 posts, read 26,226,229 times
Reputation: 11716
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverbelles View Post
But, this is not to say that AAs and Dominicans get along very well because in my experience, I would argue the opposite. One of the reasons I began to proudly say, "Yes, I am a Black Latina" was because I started to encounter people who refused to accept that I was black. I was routinely questioned about the "other half" which made me seem different. Dominicans do not fit the standard of blackness for many AA folk. I get along very well with Haitians, other black Caribbean folk, as well as Africans, but AAs can be a toss up depending on their own personal concept of blackness.

(Just realized that my experiences are kind of conflicting, but Dominican and AA relations aren't an even road of acceptance and understanding, imo)
This depends on how you view "getting along." There are really no two ethnic or racial groups that "get along" if we're talking about perfect harmony and accord. Blacks and Jews? Hardly. Whites and Blacks? No. Chinese and Blacks? No. Indians and Chinese? No. West Indians and AAs? No. West Indians and Africans in particular look down on AAs to some degree (as does everyone in the whole entire world for that matter) and often seek to a create a bit of daylight between them.

Being "black" is the lowest of the low of the low and most people try to distance themselves from "blackness" either consciously or subconsciously. I mean, how many times have you heard a black person say, "I got Indian in my family!" Given that some black people often times make an effort to distance themselves from total and complete "blackness," should it really be any surprise that Dominicans and Puerto Ricans do the same? "Black" is the ultimate stigma to be avoided at all costs. It's the equivalent of the use of the term "suburban" here on City-Data.

That said, I think Dominicans and AAs have a much tighter relationship than Dominicans/Salvadorans, Dominicans/Mexicans, etc., etc. If you go to any club in NYC, PA, or Florida spinning Hip Hop and R&B (that's important to italicize, btw), you're likely to get a good mixture of AAs, West Indians, Ricans and Dominicans with virtually no Mexicans or Central Americans. And if you think about it, who's the Mexican/Central American equivalent of Angie Martinez, Rosario Dawson, Roselyn Sanchez, La La Vasquez, Dania Ramirez, Swizz Beats, Peedi Crakk, N.O.R.E., Carmelo Anthony, Fat Joe, Rosie Perez, Juelz Santana and "Jim Jones"--all individuals who are some degree aligned with "black" identity and culture and therefore have "cred?"

Last edited by BajanYankee; 01-06-2013 at 09:00 AM..
 
Old 01-06-2013, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,258 posts, read 26,226,229 times
Reputation: 11716
Actually, I think a more interesting topic of discussion would revolve around whether people think Panamanians have more in common with Guatemalans/Mexicans/Salvadorans than West Indians.
 
Old 01-06-2013, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Caribbean
7,558 posts, read 2,428,887 times
Reputation: 2738
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I don't know about this. Even though Dominicans won't cop to being "black," there's still some concept of "blackness" and/or "Caribbeaness" that unites people of African descent in the Caribbean. That's why you see a lot of Haitians and Dominicans on Labor Day even though carnival is technically for "West Indians" (the British ones). I really don't think Dominicans or Puerto Ricans see themselves as having much in common with Central Americans at all (other than a common tongue). At the end of the day, most Dominicans are black people, and I think this is reflected in the social and relationship patterns you see in NYC.
This is why I see them as Caribbean Latinos. At times they may come out to Caribbean events because they hail from the region and share some similarities. At the same time, they are still Latinos...and imo, a mixed Afro/Euro people. To me honest, I would still likely feel culturally closer to a Chinese or Portuguese Vincentian than a Dominican, though most of them have African heritage.
 
Old 01-06-2013, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,258 posts, read 26,226,229 times
Reputation: 11716
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
This is why I see them as Caribbean Latinos. At times they may come out to Caribbean events because they hail from the region and share some similarities. At the same time, they are still Latinos...and imo, a mixed Afro/Euro people. To me honest, I would still likely feel culturally closer to a Chinese or Portuguese Vincentian than a Dominican, though most of them have African heritage.
I could see this on some level. It's about as difficult for a Chinese person in Jamaica to avoid black people and "black" culture as it is for a black person in Montana to avoid white people. So the chances of meeting someone of Chinese-West Indian heritage who identifies with the same cultural things that a black person from the same region identifies with are great.

At the same time, I still don't think Dominicans really think they have much in common with, say, Guatemalans other than the general "Hispanic" label. When the rubber meets the road, you see Dominicans identifying with AAs/West Indians more than you do with Central Americans notwithstanding the obvious self-hatred that dwells within some of them. Dominicans are in some sense kind of like the girl who claims to have never dated a bad boy, never wants any part of a bad boy, and would run away from a bad boy at a moment's notice, but then inexplicably finds herself mired in relationship after relationship with the hustler, player, drug dealer, abuser, etc. Then when you confront her with the evidence, she steadfastly and comically maintains her position of "I don't date those kinds of guys!" As they say, denial is more than just a river in Egypt.
 
Old 01-06-2013, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,258 posts, read 26,226,229 times
Reputation: 11716
Dominicans can act very weird if you ask them about race. One of my coolest female friends is Dominican. If she didn't tell you that, you would never know because she looks like any ordinary light to light, brown-skinned AA girl. All of her friends are either AA or Dominican. She was a member of all the black organizations on campus and even pledged Alpha Kappa Alpha (lol). She and her friends all date or are married to black guys (and they have always primarily "checked" for black guys). And they go to mostly black clubs, parties, happy hours, networking events, etc. and listen to primarily Hip Hop and R&B.

Yet when I asked her if she identifies as "black" whatsoever, she'll never give me a straight answer. She one time said "I won't let them count me as both Black and Hispanic" or some non-sense response like that. They must have some Call of Duty Black Ops type of brainwashing program going on in the DR.

BTW, I know a lot of Dominicans and PRs who have attended schools like Howard and Spelman. So they must identify as "black" on some level, right?
 
Old 01-06-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Caribbean
7,558 posts, read 2,428,887 times
Reputation: 2738
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Dominicans can act very weird if you ask them about race. One of my coolest female friends is Dominican. If she didn't tell you that, you would never know because she looks like any ordinary light to light, brown-skinned AA girl. All of her friends are either AA or Dominican. She was a member of all the black organizations on campus and even pledged Alpha Kappa Alpha (lol). She and her friends all date or are married to black guys (and they have always primarily "checked" for black guys). And they go to mostly black clubs, parties, happy hours, networking events, etc. and listen to primarily Hip Hop and R&B.

Yet when I asked her if she identifies as "black" whatsoever, she'll never give me a straight answer. She one time said "I won't let them count me as both Black and Hispanic" or some non-sense response like that. They must have some Call of Duty Black Ops type of brainwashing program going on in the DR.

BTW, I know a lot of Dominicans and PRs who have attended schools like Howard and Spelman. So they must identify as "black" on some level, right?
Hmmmm. Not sure I really see an issue with her reasoning. It's true. There is not the option for her to choose both "black" and "hispanic" because usually it states black (non-hispanic). Perhaps she is and was raised to see herself as mixed, regardless of how she may appear to many others. U.S. categorization is backwards. It's somewhat like went West Indians of African descent choose "other" because "Black and African-American" are used interchangeably, when it is not for them and many others.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top