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Old 11-22-2011, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Brazil
1,550 posts, read 2,042,007 times
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Just one more thread about Brazil.

This time about religion.

I think that nobody can really understand the Brazilian culture without knowing a little bit about the influence of the Kardecist "religion" in Brazil.

I'm not a Kardecist myself, but I have many friends who are Kardecists, or have a deep influence of Kardecism in their beliefs.



But what is Kardecism (Spiritism)??

Some information from those Wikipedia articles:

Spiritism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

History of Spiritism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


"In a stricter sense, it is the religion, beliefs and practices of the people affiliated to the International Spiritist Union, based on the works of Allan Kardec and others. Formed in France in the 19th century, it soon spread to other countries, but today the only country where it has a significant number of adherents is Brazil."



"Spiritism is based on the five books of the Spiritist Codification written by French educator Hypolite Léon Denizard Rivail under the pseudonym Allan Kardec reporting séances in which he observed a series of phenomena that he attributed to incorporeal intelligence (spirits). His assumption of spirit communication was validated by many contemporaries, among them many scientists and philosophers who attended séances and studied the phenomena. His work was later extended by writers like Leon Denis, Arthur Conan Doyle, Camille Flammarion, Gabriel Delanne, Ernesto Bozzano, Chico Xavier, Divaldo Pereira Franco, Waldo Vieira, Johannes Greber and others.

Spiritism has adherents in many countries throughout the world, including Spain, United States, Canada, Japan, Germany, France, England, Argentina, Portugal and especially in American countries such as Cuba, Jamaica, and Brazil, which has among the largest proportion and greatest number of followers."



"The fundamental principles of Spiritism, enunciated by Allan Kardec in his seminal work The Spirits Book, are: (i) A belief in the existence of spirits - non-physical beings that live in the invisible or spirit world - and (ii) the possibility of communication between these spirits and living people through mediumship. There is a clear difference between the terms "Spiritism" and "Spiritualism":

Although there are many similarities between the two, they differ in some fundamental aspects, particularly regarding man's quest toward spiritual perfection and the manner by which the followers of each practice their beliefs.

Spiritism teaches reincarnation or rebirth into human life after death. This basically distinguishes Spiritism from Spiritualism. According to the Spiritist doctrine, reincarnation explains the moral and intellectual differences among men. It also provides the path to man's moral and intellectual perfection by amending for his mistakes and increasing his knowledge in successive lives. For this reason Spiritism does not accept rebirth in animals as this would be retrogressive.

Finally, unlike Spiritualism, Spiritism is not a religious sect but a philosophy or a way of life by which its followers live by. Its followers have no priests or ministers and do not follow any religious rituals in their meetings. They also do not call their places of meetings as churches, and instead call them by various names such as centers, society or association. Their activities consist mainly of studying the Spiritist doctrine, applying spiritual healing to the sick and organizing charitable missions."



"Part of the problems faced by Spiritism were shared by the Internationalist movements, and probably due to this. Besides spiritists, esperantists, socialists, and others were also the target of repression by fascist regimes. Repression to Spiritism was particularly strong in Italy and Portugal.

In South America, on the other hand, none of the above factors was enough to weaken the spreading of the doctrine. Catholicism was losing popular support, the government did not oppose Spiritism, most people were not aware of scientific discoveries and the religion had not spread only among the upper classes. Thanks to the works of a few dedicated preachers it managed to lay solid foundations which allowed it survive as an important movement still today.

Such relocation occurred most successfully in Brazil, where more than 4 million people declare themselves "Kardecist Spiritists", according to the last IBGE census data, making Brazil the largest Spiritist country in the world."




Well... You may think that 4 million people in a country of 190 million is very few people...

But the 4 million are just those who openly consider themselves as "Kardecist Spiritists".

In fact, the influence of Kardecism in the Brazilian culture is much wider. There are millions of Brazilians who consider themselves as "Catholics" and go to the Catholic mass every Sunday, but have some link with Kardecists, read Kardecist books, and believe in mediumship and reincarnation.

The influence of Kardecism can be seen in the Brazilian media and in the Brazilian movies.

Many popular soap operas (telenovelas) in Brazilian TV show Kardecist concepts in their plot. Examples are soap operas like "A Viagem", "Alma Gemea" and "Escrito nas Estrelas".

In recent years, many Spiritist movies were launched in Brazil, and most were very successful among the general public. Examples include:

- Bezerra de Menezes - O Diario de um Espirito (2008)

- Nosso Lar (2010)

- As Maes de Chico Xavier (2011)



Well... Now you know how influential Kardecism (Spiritism) is in Brazil. Since it's a "religion" largely unknown in other countries, I think it's a interesting peculiarity of Brazil.
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Is that the one popular in SALVADOR & BAHIA?

Or was that 'Condomble'...or am I mixing it with another one that is similar in another part of the Americas?

I went to a 'spiritist' ceremony in Salvador. It was almost 12 years back, so a bit hard to remember now. But, I remember it was real interesting at the time.
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Old 11-22-2011, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Brazil
1,550 posts, read 2,042,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Is that the one popular in SALVADOR & BAHIA?

Or was that 'Condomble'...or am I mixing it with another one that is similar in another part of the Americas?

I went to a 'spiritist' ceremony in Salvador. It was almost 12 years back, so a bit hard to remember now. But, I remember it was real interesting at the time.

Spiritism (Kardecism) is not an African religion like Candomble or Umbanda.

Spiritism (Kardecism) is an European religion, created in France by Allan Kardec in the 19th century.

In some parts of Brazil where the African religions (Candomble, Umbanda) are popular, like in Salvador, for example, there is some degree of "syncretism" between those African religions and Spiritism, because both believe in "obsession" by spirits.

But you should not confuse Spiritism and Candomble.

Most believers of Spiritism don't have any relations at all with Candomble, as well as most believers of Candomble don't have any relations at all with Spiritism.
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Old 11-22-2011, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Brazil
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To give you a notion of how influential Spiritism is in Brazil, I just need to tell you that here in the city where I live, Fortaleza, there is an important avenue called "Allan Kardec avenue".

And there is another even more important avenue called "Bezerra de Menezes avenue". Bezerra de Menezes was one of the first Spiritists in Brazil, one of the leaders of the Spiritist "movement" during the first years in Brazil.

There are dozens of "Centros Espiritas" (Spiritist Centres) in Fortaleza, with thousands of people who attend them.
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Macao
13,040 posts, read 20,007,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
To give you a notion of how influential Spiritism is in Brazil, I just need to tell you that here in the city where I live, Fortaleza, there is an important avenue called "Allan Kardec avenue".

And there is another even more important avenue called "Bezerra de Menezes avenue". Bezerra de Menezes was one of the first Spiritists in Brazil, one of the leaders of the Spiritist "movement" during the first years in Brazil.

There are dozens of "Centros Espiritas" (Spiritist Centres) in Fortaleza, with thousands of people who attend them.
Not to sidestep the conversation too much....as I wasn't aware of a Spiritism movement in Brazil to that degree.

But, I have seen record numbers of Catholics convert to 'Evangelical' in the last decade or two of Brazil. Or so I've read anyways.
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Old 11-23-2011, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Brazil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Not to sidestep the conversation too much....as I wasn't aware of a Spiritism movement in Brazil to that degree.

But, I have seen record numbers of Catholics convert to 'Evangelical' in the last decade or two of Brazil. Or so I've read anyways.

Yes, the Protestant / Evangelical churches are expanding a lot in Brazil. There are thousands of different denominations, and the temples are everywhere.

The largest denominations are the "Assembleia de Deus" (Assemblies of God) and the native "Igreja Universal" (created by "bishop" Edir Macedo, who is now a very rich man, and is owner of Rede Record, Brazil's second largest television network).

But the Catholic Church is still by far the largest in Brazil. More than 70% of Brazilians are Catholics, even when the majority of them rarely go to the mass (most go to the mass just one or two times per year).

And, as I have said, many of the Catholics have some degree of influence from the Spiritism / Kardecism. Many have already went to some "Centro Espirita", at least one time in life...
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Old 11-24-2011, 03:20 AM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
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I have a friend from Rio who believes in this stuff - not my cup of tea, but hey, to each their own.
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Old 06-09-2013, 12:35 PM
 
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I really do not understand why in American society spiritism is little spread, as we know in brazil there are a lot of followers; the spiritism doctrine is regarded by different social class, most of towns, cities has a house, center to study the kardecist doctrine.
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Old 06-15-2013, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Brazil
1,550 posts, read 2,042,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlos Roberto View Post
I really do not understand why in American society spiritism is little spread, as we know in brazil there are a lot of followers; the spiritism doctrine is regarded by different social class, most of towns, cities has a house, center to study the kardecist doctrine.


Kardecism is "little spread" in almost every country of the world, with the exception of Brazil...

Many Brazilian Kardecists don't know it, but Kardecism is not popular even in France, where it originated from...

It's like Buddhism, that originated in India, but is not popular in India...


Basically, Kardecism today is popular only in Brazil...
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Old 06-16-2013, 07:43 AM
 
1,829 posts, read 1,016,948 times
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So how does this work?

Are these 4 million people like mediums that regular catholics consult for spiritual healing? Are some of the 4 million just followers? Are these mediums able to call or see your past spirits? Are the able to see the past or predict the future? Are there places similar to Botánicas or Yerberias where regular people can buy herbs for healings rituals?

Quote:
According to the Spiritist doctrine, reincarnation explains the moral and intellectual differences among men. It also provides the path to man's moral and intellectual perfection by amending for his mistakes and increasing his knowledge in successive lives.
Do you know what do they mean by that? What knowledge are they talking about and HOW do they amend their past mistakes?

Since they believe in recarnation, do people in distress visit these healers and are told there is a past spirit that is causing their present misfortunes?
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