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Old 12-21-2011, 11:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by almost3am View Post
I was thinking about this and was really stumped, as my Brazilian friends have dark brown, light brown, and blonde hair, with a mix of either straight or wavy. Their skin color varies from white to brown. So, to help me think about it I checked out this link, which in the end only confused me more.

Brazilian people - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is not confusing. They are diverse. There is no Brazilian race. They are similar to Americans in that they have a diverse population.

Countries like Japan, China, Sweden, Norway, Rwanda, etc might pull up a certain race to mind, but countries like the US and Brazil are a full spectrum of races.

 
Old 12-21-2011, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
It is not confusing. They are diverse. There is no Brazilian race. They are similar to Americans in that they have a diverse population.

Countries like Japan, China, Sweden, Norway, Rwanda, etc might pull up a certain race to mind, but countries like the US and Brazil are a full spectrum of races.
The only difference between the USA and Brazil is that in the USA more than 60% of the population is white, and in Brazil whites are less than 50% of the population.
 
Old 12-21-2011, 11:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allenk893 View Post
I really don't think Brazil is as racially diversified as people like to think. There is black-latino, white-latino, and mulatto. I don't get what is so diverse about that.
Right so a Portuguese Brazilian, an Italian Brazilian and a German Brazilian are "white-latino" to you - then by the same logic an Italian American, an Irish American and a Jewish American are"white-anglo" to you?

Besides the aforementioned groups there are Native Americans, Spaniards, Asians, Jews, etc, as well as infinite combinations of these and other elements. Have you ever been to Brazil or do you know anything about the country at all?
 
Old 12-21-2011, 12:01 PM
 
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The OP posted a chart of ethnic and racial mixes in Brazil on another thread. I thought it was interesting that the term "Ainoco" (Ainoko) is used in Brazil instead of Eurasian or Amerasian'. Brazil has the largest Japanese population out side of Japan. Largest by about two million. You can see the strength they have to affect the Portuguese language with that particular loan word. I meet many Brazilian Japanese kids when i was a student in Tokyo in the 60's. They are an interesting group of people. There seem to be those who have an interest in the culture of their parents or grand[parents country and others who make an effort to define themselves as Brazilian. One girl told me "My parents are Japanese but I am Brazilian." That's a pretty healthy attitude when you like in the Americas.

Someone told me there is a simplified code on the street in Brazil Black, Brown and White with the East Asians being classified as white. Makes sense to me.
 
Old 12-21-2011, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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Oh yeah, the Jews... We rarely remember about them.

During the Catholic Inquisition in Portugal and Spain, a lot of "New Christians" (cristãos-novos), who were jews that converted to Christianism, migrated to Brazil, because the Inquisition was less powerful here.

So, many thousands of jews also composed the genetic background of the Brazilian people, even if Judaism as a religion is very small in Brazil.
 
Old 12-21-2011, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom9 View Post
The OP posted a chart of ethnic and racial mixes in Brazil on another thread. I thought it was interesting that the term "Ainoco" (Ainoko) is used in Brazil instead of Eurasian or Amerasian'. Brazil has the largest Japanese population out side of Japan. Largest by about two million. You can see the strength they have to affect the Portuguese language with that particular loan word. I meet many Brazilian Japanese kids when i was a student in Tokyo in the 60's. They are an interesting group of people. There seem to be those who have an interest in the culture of their parents or grand[parents country and others who make an effort to define themselves as Brazilian. One girl told me "My parents are Japanese but I am Brazilian." That's a pretty healthy attitude when you like in the Americas.

Someone told me there is a simplified code on the street in Brazil Black, Brown and White with the East Asians being classified as white. Makes sense to me.

The Japanese are loved and respected here in Brazil. They really influencied the Brazilian culture, including the cuisine. Yakisoba became a very popular dish here!

The descendants of the Japanese identify themselves as Brazilians. Many of them went to Japan, the land of their ancestors, to work, but once they are there, they feel that they are much more Brazilians than Japanese.
 
Old 12-21-2011, 12:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
The Japanese are loved and respected here in Brazil. They really influencied the Brazilian culture, including the cuisine. Yakisoba became a very popular dish here!

The descendants of the Japanese identify themselves as Brazilians. Many of them went to Japan, the land of their ancestors, to work, but once they are there, they feel that they are much more Brazilians than Japanese.
First off, Brazil has awesome Sushi. You can get excellent sushi cheap there.

As for Brazilians in Japan. They have had trouble fitting in with Japanese culture. Japan is culturally homogenous, and although they have the same ancestry, the culture of Japanese Brazilians is very different. Japanese people never really accepted them, so they never assimilated. Japan considers their plan to bring back Brazilian Japanese as a failure. Japan has only themselves to blame.
 
Old 12-21-2011, 12:49 PM
 
Location: IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
First off, Brazil has awesome Sushi. You can get excellent sushi cheap there.

As for Brazilians in Japan. They have had trouble fitting in with Japanese culture. Japan is culturally homogenous, and although they have the same ancestry, the culture of Japanese Brazilians is very different. Japanese people never really accepted them, so they never assimilated. Japan considers their plan to bring back Brazilian Japanese as a failure. Japan has only themselves to blame.
Interesting, I didn't know this piece of info. "We want you back, but not the way you are..."
 
Old 12-21-2011, 12:55 PM
 
Location: IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
The Japanese are loved and respected here in Brazil. They really influencied the Brazilian culture, including the cuisine. Yakisoba became a very popular dish here!

The descendants of the Japanese identify themselves as Brazilians. Many of them went to Japan, the land of their ancestors, to work, but once they are there, they feel that they are much more Brazilians than Japanese.
One of the first times I was flying to Rio I connected through Sao Paulo. As we landed in Sao Paulo I noticed nearly every person that looked Japanese got up and got off the flight. I asked what was up with that and found out about the large Japanese population in Sao Paulo. A year or two later, I was hiking up Mount Whitney and was passing this guy struggling up the mountain that looked Japanese to me, but I noticed he had a Brazilian soccer jersey (the blue version). In my head I thought, "Sao Paulo for sure." I started talking to him and found out he was in fact from Sao Paulo. Now, when I think Japanese and Brazil, I think Sao Paulo, although I have never checked the stats on it.
 
Old 12-21-2011, 01:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
You only forgot the indigenous people (Native South Americans), and the people who are mixed of indigenous and white, and the people who are mixed of indigenous and black, and the people who are mixed of indigenous, white AND black.

And you forgot the descendants of the millions of Japanese immigrants, including those who mixed with other races.

And also the descendants of the millions of Lebanese (Arab) immigrants...

I'm confused. I thought the mulatto race included all that?
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