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View Poll Results: Which of these cities do you prefer?
Mexico City 22 28.57%
Buenos Aires 55 71.43%
Voters: 77. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-03-2012, 07:37 PM
 
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Wow, Buenos Aires has a lot of love!

I have never been so I posted Mexico City. It's such a vibrant place. I am young and full of energy though.

Mexico City Vibes, your guide to this immensely vibrant capital
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Old 03-16-2012, 11:38 AM
 
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I'll say Mexico city because I've never been to b.aires, though I've seen pictures and would LOVE to go !!
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Old 03-16-2012, 01:53 PM
 
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I've been to Buenos Aires twice and it's as far as Europe, in flying time.

I've been to Mexico City zero times, and it's "close by."
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Old 03-17-2012, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Olde English District, SC (look it up on Wikipedia)
244 posts, read 313,569 times
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BA, but I'm actually more interested in Uruguay. Haven't been to any of these places, though.
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Old 03-18-2012, 10:52 AM
 
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Comparing BA to Mexico City is like comparing SF to New York City.

SF is prettier but NYC wins just out of sheer size.
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Old 03-18-2012, 10:35 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,145 posts, read 23,656,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PosterExtraordinaire View Post
Comparing BA to Mexico City is like comparing SF to New York City.

SF is prettier but NYC wins just out of sheer size.
Not quite the same comparison based on two things:

The size difference between SF/Bay Area and NYC is far larger than the size difference between Buenos Aires and Mexico City.

The per capita wealth of Buenos Aires is significantly higher than that of Mexico City.

Those two factors combined have agencies such as PWC ranking Mexico City only slightly higher in Gross Metropolitan Product compared to Buenos Aires.
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Old 03-19-2012, 09:47 AM
 
827 posts, read 1,207,620 times
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BA is a huge city divided in 48 “barrios” (neighborhoods), and each and every one of them offers an unique experience. There are hundreds of “confiterias” (coffee shops), museums, independent book stores, fine arts exhibitions, beautiful Japanese Gardens, beautiful historical landmarks all over the city, etc. The food in Argentina, even though is not that varied, is exquisite. Argentina is known for their meat, which is a product of raising grass fed cattle. Usually the meat is served with baked or mashed potatoes, and bread. Due to Italian immigration, one can also find amazing Italian restaurants with a Latin flavor (Sotovoce is a good example). If you are a sport freak, BA breaths soccer. Try to catch a match of one of the two most famous teams in “fútbol” history, Boca Juniors or River Plate. Musically speaking, Buenos Aires is a Mecca, being the birthplace of Tango, and “Rock en Español”. Tango is still heavily practice around the city, but if you want to indulge in nostalgia, catch a show at La Ventana; best music show I’ve seen in my life. If you go outside Buenos Aires the city and to the province, visit a “Gaucho” (Argentinean cowboy) ranch, which usually also offers a show of “boleadoras” and tons of food. Don’t worry about the language, almost everyone in the city speaks English. Safety wise, you have to be aware of some sketchy areas (La Boca, even though is beautiful, it might not be that safe at night), but all in all, is a very safe city. The public transportation in the city is far better than NYC, and cheaper too, with a great mix of Taxis, Subway, Buses and Light Rail; you won’t need a car at all!. If all that was not enough, the Argentine peso is three per one US dollar, so you get astonishing value for money. Buenos Aires is my favorite city in the world!
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Old 03-19-2012, 11:37 AM
 
Location: CHicago, United States
6,936 posts, read 7,259,613 times
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I've lived in Mexico City, but haven't visited Buenos Aires. I speak Spanish. I'm from the Midwest USA and have family here, so Mexico City is closer ... for family and in case I would need/want to return for medical care. Mexico City is an exciting environment to be in. Great food. Lots of cultutral opportunities. Pretty good weather. I've thought about retiring to Mexico City, but if I did that I'd want to have the resources to live in one of the traditionally nicer areas. Living poor in Mexico amongst the poor is not something most people will find enjoyable. One day I'll visit BA. I've been to Rio several times, and would move there without second thought - except for the distance issue.
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Old 03-19-2012, 12:13 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,145 posts, read 23,656,611 times
Reputation: 11621
Quote:
Originally Posted by mickey mouse is dead View Post
BA is a huge city divided in 48 “barrios” (neighborhoods), and each and every one of them offers an unique experience. There are hundreds of “confiterias” (coffee shops), museums, independent book stores, fine arts exhibitions, beautiful Japanese Gardens, beautiful historical landmarks all over the city, etc. The food in Argentina, even though is not that varied, is exquisite. Argentina is known for their meat, which is a product of raising grass fed cattle. Usually the meat is served with baked or mashed potatoes, and bread. Due to Italian immigration, one can also find amazing Italian restaurants with a Latin flavor (Sotovoce is a good example). If you are a sport freak, BA breaths soccer. Try to catch a match of one of the two most famous teams in “fútbol” history, Boca Juniors or River Plate. Musically speaking, Buenos Aires is a Mecca, being the birthplace of Tango, and “Rock en Español”. Tango is still heavily practice around the city, but if you want to indulge in nostalgia, catch a show at La Ventana; best music show I’ve seen in my life. If you go outside Buenos Aires the city and to the province, visit a “Gaucho” (Argentinean cowboy) ranch, which usually also offers a show of “boleadoras” and tons of food. Don’t worry about the language, almost everyone in the city speaks English. Safety wise, you have to be aware of some sketchy areas (La Boca, even though is beautiful, it might not be that safe at night), but all in all, is a very safe city. The public transportation in the city is far better than NYC, and cheaper too, with a great mix of Taxis, Subway, Buses and Light Rail; you won’t need a car at all!. If all that was not enough, the Argentine peso is three per one US dollar, so you get astonishing value for money. Buenos Aires is my favorite city in the world!
Does Buenos Aires have a large variety of Italian and Spanish cuisine? Both those countries have very distinctive regions and regional cuisines, so I'm curious as to how that's translated into BA's food. In the US, Italian foods been pretty heavily transformed into a southern Italy derived and transformed red sauce cuisine with very little other regions represented.
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Old 03-26-2012, 12:00 PM
 
827 posts, read 1,207,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Does Buenos Aires have a large variety of Italian and Spanish cuisine? Both those countries have very distinctive regions and regional cuisines, so I'm curious as to how that's translated into BA's food. In the US, Italian foods been pretty heavily transformed into a southern Italy derived and transformed red sauce cuisine with very little other regions represented.
About 60% or Argentina's population is of Italian ancestry. I read that that pre 1900's immigrants came mostly from the Northern region like Piedmont and Lombardy, but as the North industrialized, immigration shifted to rural south.

As far as cuisine, I think more regions of Italy are represented than in the US. For example, the Polenta is heavily consumed and pretty common. I have never seen that dish in the US before.

Their pizzas resemble more a calzone than a pizza, and pastas are also heavily consumed, and they ususally eat it with bread, and lots of Italian sugo.

That is as far as I can tell with my little knowledge on the cuisine subject.
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