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Old 02-06-2012, 03:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
I was wondering if anyone here knew much about public feelings on the subject of the Monarchy in the Carribean Commonwealth realms where Queen Elizabeth is the head of state. In Jamaica, for example, is there a big movement to become a republic as there is in Australia? Are people more apathetic about the Monarchy as they are in Canada, valuing it as a constitutional check and link to the country's heritage, but for the most part not giving it very much thought? Or is it more like the UK, with some abolitionists, but for the most part people paying alot of attention to Royals as celebrities, and caring alot about the institution? I'm just curious as to general ideas regarding the institution in the various nations, and if sentiment differs at all between them.
Well here in Australia the republican movement is more to the sidelines thesedays and has been for quite sometime. Its not an big movement these days compared to 20 years ago and it was stirred up by an former Prime minister Paul Keating. Yet the present Prime Minister Jullia Gillard does support Australia to become an republic eventually but only after the present Queen dies.

For the Carribean most people don't mind the Queen yet for Jamaica there is still an large number of people supporting the current system and an bigger number wanting Jamaica to revert to British rule.

Recent data collected from more than 1,000 Jamaican residents by pollster Bill Johnson indicated 44 per cent of those questioned thought that the current Westminster-style governance system should be retained, while 35 per cent said it should be replaced with a republican system. The poll had a 4 per cent margin of error.

The same poll found 60 per cent of respondents thought Jamaica would be better off today if it had remained under British rule rather than going independent in 1962.


cayCompass.com :: New Jamaica PM: We will be a republic
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Old 02-06-2012, 04:05 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by other99 View Post
Well here in Australia the republican movement is more to the sidelines thesedays and has been for quite sometime. Its not an big movement these days compared to 20 years ago and it was stirred up by an former Prime minister Paul Keating. Yet the present Prime Minister Jullia Gillard does support Australia to become an republic eventually but only after the present Queen dies.

For the Carribean most people don't mind the Queen yet for Jamaica there is still an large number of people supporting the current system and an bigger number wanting Jamaica to revert to British rule.

Recent data collected from more than 1,000 Jamaican residents by pollster Bill Johnson indicated 44 per cent of those questioned thought that the current Westminster-style governance system should be retained, while 35 per cent said it should be replaced with a republican system. The poll had a 4 per cent margin of error.

The same poll found 60 per cent of respondents thought Jamaica would be better off today if it had remained under British rule rather than going independent in 1962.


cayCompass.com :: New Jamaica PM: We will be a republic
It's my understanding that while the Jamaican Parliament can 'approve' becoming a republic it would still have to be put to a referendum which according to the polls is not likely to pass. St. Vincent & the Grenadines held a republic referendum in 2009 which was defeated by a big margin. Like the current Jamaican republic push, the republic concept was supported by the political elite but heavily opposed among the general population. How surprising ... politicans out of touch with reality. These islands have so many problems with crime, quality of life, education, etc and these clowns are more concerned with who the head of state is ... absurd.

Personally I believe that many of these islands should never have become independent in the first place. Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands, etc remain British Overseas Territories (aka "colonies") and are leaps and bounds ahead of the islands that went independent.
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Old 02-06-2012, 04:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by WIHS2006 View Post

Personally I believe that many of these islands should never have become independent in the first place. Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands, etc remain British Overseas Territories (aka "colonies") and are leaps and bounds ahead of the islands that went independent.
The islands that are Overseas Territories are tiny compare to the ones that are independent. Bermuda is the largest with a population of 65,000. These islands have their share of corruption too.

Barbados and The Bahamas are independent and are doing well for themselves. The islands that are having problems now, had problems under Colonial rule.
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Old 02-06-2012, 10:09 PM
 
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Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
But they're not in the Caribbean are they.. which is the point of this thread.
The purpose was to show that it is not necessary to shed the monarchy in order to seriously consider admission to the first rank of modern nations.
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Old 02-07-2012, 03:35 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
I know, me to. But I found this:
Jamaica to become a republic, prime minister pledges | World news | guardian.co.uk

Also from the same article:
The move reflects an accelerating drift towards republicanism among Commonwealth Caribbean countries. Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago have both dropped the Queen as head of state, while opting to remain in the Commonwealth.

So I guess you can drop Liz, but still be in the commonwealth (a la Grenada and Trinidad)
Of course, the majority of Commonwealth nations do not have 'mum' as HOS. My own country of origin Singapore, for a start.
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Old 02-07-2012, 10:12 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Of course, the majority of Commonwealth nations do not have 'mum' as HOS. My own country of origin Singapore, for a start.
I did notice the few times I was in Sing that they did not hve a governor general and I've always wondered, but never asked as it wasn't a burning question.. Thanks for that.. you taught me something today..
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Old 02-07-2012, 02:11 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
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Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
I did notice the few times I was in Sing that they did not hve a governor general and I've always wondered, but never asked as it wasn't a burning question.. Thanks for that.. you taught me something today..
Singapore became independent as a republic (like Dominica) I believe. IIRC Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Australia, and New Zealand are the only Pacific realms left. There is talk of restoring the monarchy in Fiji but it hasent happened yet.
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Old 02-09-2012, 08:42 AM
 
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In The Bahamas, we embrace The Queen and our Constitutional-Monarchy form of government. Since gaining independence in 1973, The Bahamas has thrived under stable political leadership which has in turn allowed for the development of a sound and prosperous economy. However, there have been dissent among locals and politicians as well, in regards to the country maintaining the Privy Council as our final appellate court. Many feel that the Council interferes too often in Bahamian matters. To avoid this and decrease colonial ties, many countries across the Caribbean have done away with the Privy Council as their final court of appeal and have adopted the Caribbean Court of Justice in its place. However, there is a large consensus among Bahamians that adopting this court would have a substantial affect on foreign investment in the country as they would view the Privy Council as a more reputable court of last resort should the need arrive to use the court. Other than this issue, I think Bahamians enjoy their ties to the Monarchy and The Queen. We may join our Caribbean brothers and eventually adopt the CCJ as our final appellate court, but The Queen will remain our head of state.
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