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Old 02-16-2012, 05:15 AM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
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Looking at the Wikipedia page for "Country Music", it lists countries according to the supposed popularity of country music within them:

Quote:
Mainstream popularity

1920s–present
High in Australia, Brazil, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland,and the US,
Medium in Scandinavia and New Zealand
Low in Asia, Africa, Latin America and mainland Europe.
Now I know "Wikipedia" isn't a one-stop source for knowledge (that's why I'm asking this question here), but it had the same thing on the "Eurodance" page and it was spot on as far as I know.

I've known American-style country music was popular in Australia, Ireland, the UK, and Canada for some time (though nowhere as near as popular in the rural US I suppose); but Brazil?

Also, where else have you heard country music?
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Old 02-16-2012, 05:49 AM
 
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Most people don't like that garbage. I have never heard it outside the US.
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Old 02-16-2012, 07:52 AM
 
Location: IL
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So, did they really mean American country music, or Brazilian country music, like Forro or sertaneja?
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Old 02-16-2012, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Sweden
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Me and many of my friends listen to country music, but the real one, not the pop music that is called country nowadays.
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Old 02-16-2012, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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The Brazilian version of "country music" is the sertanejo.


And just like the "country music" from the US, the Brazilian sertanejo also has two "phases": the old sertanejo, more traditional, and the modern sertanejo, with pop influences.



Old sertanejo:





Modern sertanejo:

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Old 02-16-2012, 10:59 AM
 
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Bluegrass is supposedly very popular in Japan.
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Old 02-16-2012, 11:40 AM
 
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I think the key to country music popularity is to find places where it was possible and still is for people to make a decent living in agriculture. Thus you see its wide popularity in the US and the original British dominions. The American form (specifically that originally called hillbilly music) and its offshoots have spread to other places by having interesting and unique instrument arrangments that represent a wide array of countries. Thus it is actually much more cosmoplitan than it is usually given credit for and is much more cosmoplitan than the vast majority of musical styles.

The flipside of this is of course people who worked in agriculture but didn't make much money. These people often cast their old indigenous "country" music aside as a relic of a hated past once they gained the ability to engage in other work. A perfect example of this is found in the story of the banjo. It was introduced to the US by African slaves, and it is one of the staples of traditional American country music (and indeed is still a staple for many pop country acts). However, as the freedmen and later those black people who took part in the Great Migration in the 1920s moved away from agricultural lifestyles the banjo feel out of favor in their music as something from a time when they were slaves or were poor.

Thus as Brazil also has a traditional of some folks engaging successfully in agriculture, it would not be unexpected for there to be Brazilian country music. However, one would expect it to be at least as prevalent in Argentina though with its gauchos playing much more of a role in its national image than Brazil's cowboys did (as far as I know) although one would expect it to take a form more similar in theme to American western music than country music.

Last edited by AuburnAL; 02-16-2012 at 11:44 AM.. Reason: Added third paragraph
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Old 02-16-2012, 11:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
I think the key to country music popularity is to find places where it was possible and still is for people to make a decent living in agriculture. Thus you see its wide popularity in the US and the original British dominions. The American form (specifically that originally called hillbilly music) and its offshoots have spread to other places by having interesting and unique instrument arrangments that represent a wide array of countries. Thus it is actually much more cosmoplitan than it is usually given credit for and is much more cosmoplitan than the vast majority of musical styles.

The flipside of this is of course people who worked in agriculture but didn't make much money. These people often cast their old indigenous "country" music aside as a relic of a hated past once they gained the ability to engage in other work. A perfect example of this is found in the story of the banjo. It was introduced to the US by African slaves, and it is one of the staples of traditional American country music (and indeed is still a staple for many pop country acts). However, as the freedmen and later those black people who took part in the Great Migration in the 1920s moved away from agricultural lifestyles the banjo feel out of favor in their music as something from a time when they were slaves or were poor.
Interesting points. I don't think country music has the negative connotations in other countries that it does in the states. A lot of people here view it as music by and for backward and ignorant hicks which I think is pretty ignorant myself. I think people in other countries are drawn to it because it sort of represents the whole American Cowboy mythology. Sort of like how a minority of Americans like Indian Classical music, or Argentinian Tango. They don't really "identify" with it so to speak but they really are intrigued by the culture surrounding it.

I think rural societies in any country are more likely to hang on to their own traditional music and probably aren't the ones who'd take to American country music. I think it's more a suburban and urban middle class type that is drawn to American country.

I have wondered why Bluegrass is popular in Japan. Japan in pretty far from a majority rural country yet one of the most "rural" forms of American music has gotten a foothold over there. It's almost enough to make me want to research it more to see if there may be some similarities between traditional Japanese music and Bluegrass. Is its popularity due to it golden age occurring during the immediate post war period?

These are the things that keep me up at night.
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Old 02-16-2012, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by almost3am View Post
So, did they really mean American country music, or Brazilian country music, like Forro or sertaneja?
Yeah, its probably a reference to sertaneja or forro.

There's also a country-ish kind of music in rural Rio Grande do Sul where I used to live.
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Old 02-16-2012, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
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This song was played so often during one winter down there that the words stuck in my mind and is now on my iPod. LOL.

os serranos castelhana - YouTube
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