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Old 03-19-2012, 04:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mickey mouse is dead View Post
Puerto Rico, Panama, Costa Rica, Mexico (Mexico City) and Argentina (Buenos Aires).
Panama huh? that's good to hear. i plan on going down there to learn spanish, but having people speak english a bit can't hurt =)
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Old 03-19-2012, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Provided the hotel is part of an American chain!
Not necessarily...

In most good hotels of the world, even those that are not part of any international chain, part of the staff always speak English...
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Old 03-19-2012, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
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On the Caribbean coasts of Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama, you'll find a lot of English-speaking black people.

Although people who can say they honestly speak English are rare in Mexico, the English language is taught in almost every school, at least at the high school level. English words are infiltrating into the otherwise Spanish speech of young people, leading to such expressions as "No tengo mucho time" ("no tengo mucho tiempo"; I don't have much time) or "Lo pasare con la family" (I will spend it with the family).
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Old 03-20-2012, 05:16 AM
 
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would you guys say it's more common to find bilingual people or english-speaking people in Central America/Mexico vs. South America?
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Old 03-20-2012, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Not necessarily...

In most good hotels of the world, even those that are not part of any international chain, part of the staff always speak English...
Yeah, I know. I was sort of joking. Though it is surprising to see how many downtown hotels in cities like Santiago and Buenos Aires can have no one at the front desk who speaks English.

Also, I think that at least part of the appeal (for some people) of chains like the Hilton and the Marriott internationally is the guaranteed service in English.
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Old 03-20-2012, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie555 View Post
would you guys say it's more common to find bilingual people or english-speaking people in Central America/Mexico vs. South America?
My personal view is that there are more people who speak English in Central America and Mexico (and also non-English islands of the Caribbean) than in South America.
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
On the Caribbean coasts of Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama, you'll find a lot of English-speaking black people.

Although people who can say they honestly speak English are rare in Mexico, the English language is taught in almost every school, at least at the high school level. English words are infiltrating into the otherwise Spanish speech of young people, leading to such expressions as "No tengo mucho time" ("no tengo mucho tiempo"; I don't have much time) or "Lo pasare con la family" (I will spend it with the family).
You hit the nail on the head for Panama-- in Panama City, English is most certainly NOT widespread, but the Caribbean side/ black Panamanians do have a tendency to speak more English.

If you go to more touristy areas of Panama (ie: Casco Viejo, Boquete, Bocas) you will definitely find a lot more English. In Panama City, I'd say the most English you'll find is in El Cangrejo given the amount of foreigners there.

ETA- The Spanish-speaking city where I found the most English speakers in Latin America would probably be Mexico City.
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Old 03-20-2012, 12:22 PM
 
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Define "widely." Big generalizations, but that's what you asked for. Some of the countries, such as Argentina and, even more so, Brazil are quite large (e.g., Brazil is almost as big as the continental U.S.) with millions and millions of people. Some cities, such as Sao Paulo, are more oriented towards international business, and places like Rio get a lot of English and American tourists, so you'll find more English spoken in hotels, etc., but still not a majority of people speak English. Of course, far fewer Americans speak Portuguese. And while more speak Spanish, that varies widely by area. Are your concerns tourism or are you just curious in general?
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Old 03-20-2012, 12:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie555 View Post
would you guys say it's more common to find bilingual people or english-speaking people in Central America/Mexico vs. South America?
Which countries? Of course, the size of the countries, their populations, and their proximity to the U.S. (and number of English-speaking tourists and businesspeople who go there) all vary tremendously. Are you speaking about the entire country or principal cities?
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Old 03-20-2012, 05:18 PM
 
344 posts, read 867,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
My personal view is that there are more people who speak English in Central America and Mexico (and also non-English islands of the Caribbean) than in South America.
this seems to make sense. it's geographically much closer. A lot of South America is VERY isolated geographically. Places like uruguay, argentina, chile, etc. have to go a damn long way to get anywhere near an english speaking country, or another continent.
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