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Old 08-21-2013, 12:35 PM
 
578 posts, read 756,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
I seem to recall reading of a town in Colombia that was settled by English. It looks like I might be thinking of San Andres and Providencia Island.

San Andres Island confronting modernity - Columns - JamaicaObserver.com

Would the Panama Canal Zone still have a fair amount of Americans? Or Panama in general for that matter? It seemed like Costa Rica had some US immigrants or wealthy people who bought a second home there. I believe the US occupied the Dominican Republic for awhile and they're in an area of linguistic diversity. Still they might not work.

Otherwise Belize and Guyana if you count them.
The Panama Canal Zone only existed from 1903 to 1979. In Costa Rica, the descendants of Jamaican immigrants that settled mainly in Limon often still speak English in addition to Spanish.

In Bocas del Toro, Panama some descendants of West Indians that settled in Panama speak English and English based dialects in addition to Panama. Descendants of Bajans that settled in other parts of Panama often spoke in English especially since they were used as cheap labor to build the Panama Canal and deal with it even after it's inception.

Over the years many and much of the West Indian descendants that lived in Panama have left for the USA, and those people of West Indian descent that remained in Panama over time gradually assimilated into binaries Hispanics so many do not even speak or know a lick of English anymore, especially since it was a big bone of contention betwee them and Spanish speaking Panamanians who were xenophobic and associated them and English with the imperialist and oppressive U.S. American presence and forces.

Central American nations have populations where many speak or understand English as well.
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Old 08-21-2013, 03:00 PM
 
578 posts, read 756,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
I seem to recall reading of a town in Colombia that was settled by English. It looks like I might be thinking of San Andres and Providencia Island.

San Andres Island confronting modernity - Columns - JamaicaObserver.com

Would the Panama Canal Zone still have a fair amount of Americans? Or Panama in general for that matter? It seemed like Costa Rica had some US immigrants or wealthy people who bought a second home there. I believe the US occupied the Dominican Republic for awhile and they're in an area of linguistic diversity. Still they might not work.

Otherwise Belize and Guyana if you count them.
While Colombia does own San Andres, Providencia, and Catalina islands they are not located on the Colombian mainland but they are under Colombian sovereignty. A unique ethnic group called the Raizales (meaning "rooted ones") live there. They relate heavily to and come from a Brittanic/Anglo Caribbean background. The Raizales speak English as well as an English based dialect.
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Old 08-21-2013, 03:20 PM
 
578 posts, read 756,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PosterExtraordinaire View Post
In Costa Rica, most people speak English in the port city of Limon because of all the Jamaicans working the docks. Other than that, I never noticed any spot in L. America speaking a lot of English. Even in major tourist hot spots or border cities the very best you get a handful of people who speak semi-decent English. That's part of the fun of going to a new country though!
Jamaican immigration to Costa Rica is negligible. The descendants of Jamaicans in Limon have been there since as early as the late 1800s and throughout the 1900s
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Old 08-21-2013, 03:22 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
On the Caribbean coasts of Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama, you'll find a lot of English-speaking black people.

Although people who can say they honestly speak English are rare in Mexico, the English language is taught in almost every school, at least at the high school level. English words are infiltrating into the otherwise Spanish speech of young people, leading to such expressions as "No tengo mucho time" ("no tengo mucho tiempo"; I don't have much time) or "Lo pasare con la family" (I will spend it with the family).
Most black people in Panama speak Spanish.
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Old 08-21-2013, 03:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Deakkon View Post
Are there a lot of bilingual and English speaking people in Cuba?
Yes there is. Cuba had a lot of Jamaicans and other immigrants from the British West Indies that came to Cuba for working and laboring on plantations and other projects throughout much of the 20th century. Many of their descendants are bilingual now.
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Old 12-03-2013, 09:25 PM
 
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roatan, Honduras is predominately English speaking. panama has many English creole speakers. the Mexican border has many English speakers and many English words in their Spanish. Puerto rico as well. cuba eventually will get Americanized, its too close not to although Haiti is close as well.
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Old 12-04-2013, 01:53 AM
 
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these days id include Bolivia. my cousins learned it and lot of their friends compared to mid 90s.
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Old 12-04-2013, 06:34 AM
 
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Originally Posted by mikemike84 View Post
roatan, Honduras is predominately English speaking. panama has many English creole speakers. the Mexican border has many English speakers and many English words in their Spanish. Puerto rico as well. cuba eventually will get Americanized, its too close not to although Haiti is close as well.
Panama doesn't really have as many English Creole speakers. A lot of English Creole speakers left Panama or migrated elsewhere. Also it tends to be older generations that speak it. Younger generations speak mainly Spanish. If any English Creole is revived or referred to it's usually for nostalgia, but today it's virtually a memory to the past. It's not commonly spoken anymore.
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Old 12-04-2013, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Very interesting thread. However, there is a point that might be confusing.
If you are looking for communities where the primary language is English, you will find very few and mostly related to ex-pats from anglo-speaking countries. Then, there are many people who can speak English but don't use it on a daily basis (why would they?).

For instance, here in Buenos Aires the second most widely spoken language is Guarani, but there are many more people who can speak English as a secondary language (not as many as some believe...). Now we have another problem, and this is where we would set the threshold between being a fluent speaker who can efficiently communicate with native English speakers and being a person who has a limited knowledge of the language which makes him/her able to read and/or share some greetings/easy ideas but unable to sustain a more complex conversation.
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Old 12-04-2013, 10:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mhc1985 View Post
Now we have another problem, and this is where we would set the threshold between being a fluent speaker who can efficiently communicate with native English speakers and being a person who has a limited knowledge of the language which makes him/her able to read and/or share some greetings/easy ideas but unable to sustain a more complex conversation.
In the 1920's a limited language called BASIC English was developed and published in a book in 1930. As the result of much research it was determined that an 850 word vocabulary and a 150 specialized vocabulary with only 18 verbs was sufficient to communicate. It was widely believed at the time that BASIC would be more useful than Esperanto in developing a means of common communication. The concept was ridiculed in Brave New World where it was called newspeak.

The Oxford 3000 is probably one of the best known modern limited vocabularies. It heavily influences Voice of America English which promotes English literacy.

There is also standards for use of English for aircraft maintenance manuals. English homographs like "close" as in nearby, and "close" as in the opposite of "open" are forbidden. I believe homophones like "here" and "hear" are also forbidden as given instructions verbally would be frequently misunderstood.

The 15 most commonly used verbs in English all have irregular conjugations. The 16th most commonly used verb is "to use", which is Latin in origin and has been part of English for only 800 year. The verb has a regular conjugation: "I use" "he uses", "I used it in the past", "I am using it now", "I have used". All the other verbs are based on much older words.

be
have
do
say
get
make
go
know
take
see
come
think
look
want
give
use



In Spanish word pairs like conocer and reconocer frequently exist, while in English we use a mix of Old English and Latin verbs (i.e. "to know" and "to recognize").

The English verb cognise (non-Oxford British spelling) means "to know or be aware of" but is exceedingly rare. The noun cognition is fairly common/
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