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Old 04-04-2012, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Newcastle, NSW, Australia
72 posts, read 105,891 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by britinparis View Post
This question is directed at all who have had experience living in or visiting Argentina.

I recently heard about quite a large community of Argentine citizens there of English descent. I'd be interested to know more about them - like have they maintained their English culture, do they still speak the English language well, what is their general reputation among other (larger) groups in Argentina, such as Spanish or Italian Argentines? And do they find life difficult because of the Falklands/Malvinas issue?

The reason I ask is that Argentina is the only country I can think of that is non-English-speaking that received a large flow of migrants from the UK during the early 20th century. All the other countries that did, such as the US, Canada and Australia - were already English speaking. So the English there do not seem to have hung on to much of their original culture and have integrated well into the mainstream culture of the adopted country.

Is this the same case in Argentina?
I'm not really sure, but I researched a little history on Anglo-Argentines.

Anglo-Argentines settled all over the country. There are quite a few English and Irish people in Coghlan, a district of Buenos Aires. Also, Patagonia has quite a few English people due to the proximity to the Falkland Islands. The Falkland Islands are home to only a few thousand people, but tens of thousands of Argentines are of English descent.

The majority of Anglo-Argentines speak predominantly Spanish nowadays. One very surprising thing in Anglo-Argentine culture is the presence of Anglican churches - this goes against the typical Catholic culture of Argentina. (The presence of Latin Americans who aren't Catholic or evangelical Protestant is greater than one would think. I have relatives of Lebanese background in Brazil and they are all Muslim!)

There are also scattered communities of English people in other Latin American countries. A notable one is Mexico - mostly in the state of Hidalgo. And there are also some people of English descent in Chile, though I think Irish heritage is more common in both countries.
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Old 04-04-2012, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Purgatory
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Old 04-04-2012, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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If by "Anglo-Argentine" you mean simply people of English descent, then they are like every other Argentine. They speak Spanish, dress like Argentines, etc.

If you mean English people who have come more recently or not so recently but who retain their culture to a greater extent, that's different.

I can't say anything about the latter group because I don't recall knowing anyone belonging to that group. However, as to the former group, yes, I know quite a lot of people with English surnames (well, we tend to think they're English but then we find out they're Irish). For these people (either of Irish or English descent), the Malvinas/Falklands issue is the same as for most Argentines. They support the claim that they are part of Argentina. But that is for another thread.
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Old 04-04-2012, 09:20 PM
 
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Soilant green
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Old 04-04-2012, 09:28 PM
 
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I know Argentina is MANY things, not to mention the world's 8th largest country. However, I can only tune in to its European Spanish and Italian vibes.
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Old 04-05-2012, 03:54 AM
 
Location: Paris, France
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanfel View Post
If by "Anglo-Argentine" you mean simply people of English descent, then they are like every other Argentine. They speak Spanish, dress like Argentines, etc.
Yes, I meant descendants of English people who migrated to Argentina during the early 20th century - who are now Argentines but have an English background.

As Argentina, like the US and Canada, is a country founded on immigration, is the hypenated identity (Anglo-Argentine, Italian-Argentine etc) as important as it is in the States? Or did immigrants just tend to blend in and become simply "Argentine"? Every American I meet seems to think he's Irish or Italian!

Regarding the latter grouping - as in people who have moved there recently - I read that immigration from Europe is once again becoming a phenominum in Buenos Aires for the first time in decades due to the booming economy:

Young Europeans flock to Argentina for job opportunities | World news | The Guardian

Is this actually something that's actually happening or is the Guardian merely trying to make the crisis in Europe sound worse than it is.. after all, despite the economic growth rates, per capita income and average wages are still far lower in Argentina than in Europe - even when you take into account the lower costs of living.
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Old 04-05-2012, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Derby, Western Australia
3,091 posts, read 3,535,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by britinparis View Post
This question is directed at all who have had experience living in or visiting Argentina.

I recently heard about quite a large community of Argentine citizens there of English descent. I'd be interested to know more about them - like have they maintained their English culture, do they still speak the English language well, what is their general reputation among other (larger) groups in Argentina, such as Spanish or Italian Argentines? And do they find life difficult because of the Falklands/Malvinas issue?

The reason I ask is that Argentina is the only country I can think of that is non-English-speaking that received a large flow of migrants from the UK during the early 20th century. All the other countries that did, such as the US, Canada and Australia - were already English speaking. So the English there do not seem to have hung on to much of their original culture and have integrated well into the mainstream culture of the adopted country.

Is this the same case in Argentina?
Chile as far as I know had the largest migration of British migrants (at least in terms of proportion to population) to South America during the 19th early 20th century.
British Chilean - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited by sulkiercupid; 04-05-2012 at 10:17 AM..
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Old 04-05-2012, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by britinparis View Post
Yes, I meant descendants of English people who migrated to Argentina during the early 20th century - who are now Argentines but have an English background.

As Argentina, like the US and Canada, is a country founded on immigration, is the hypenated identity (Anglo-Argentine, Italian-Argentine etc) as important as it is in the States? Or did immigrants just tend to blend in and become simply "Argentine"? Every American I meet seems to think he's Irish or Italian!

Regarding the latter grouping - as in people who have moved there recently - I read that immigration from Europe is once again becoming a phenominum in Buenos Aires for the first time in decades due to the booming economy:

Young Europeans flock to Argentina for job opportunities | World news | The Guardian

Is this actually something that's actually happening or is the Guardian merely trying to make the crisis in Europe sound worse than it is.. after all, despite the economic growth rates, per capita income and average wages are still far lower in Argentina than in Europe - even when you take into account the lower costs of living.
I heard a similar news report this week about how *some* Portuguese are moving to Brazil and even Angola(!) in search of opportunity. I suppose that certain people can move from any country X to any country Y for a job, usually depending on their fields (Angola has oil, for example), but large numbers of migrants out of Portugal to Brazil and especially Angola would seem pretty unlikely to me.

On average, Portugal is two to three times richer than Brazil, and Angola is not even in the same league.
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
5,899 posts, read 8,408,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by britinparis View Post
Yes, I meant descendants of English people who migrated to Argentina during the early 20th century - who are now Argentines but have an English background.
As Argentina, like the US and Canada, is a country founded on immigration, is the hypenat ed identity (Anglo-Argentine, Italian-Argentine etc) as important as it is in the States? Or did immigrants just tend to blend in and become simply "Argentine"? Every American I meet seems to think he's Irish or Italian!

Regarding the latter grouping - as in people who have moved there recently - I read that immigration from Europe is once again becoming a phenominum in Buenos Aires for the first time in decades due to the booming economy:

Young Europeans flock to Argentina for job opportunities | World news | The Guardian

Is this actually something that's actually happening or is the Guardian merely trying to make the crisis in Europe sound worse than it is.. after all, despite the economic growth rates, per capita income and average wages are still far lower in Argentina than in Europe - even when you take into account the lower costs of living.

As your first question, i dont know exactly what it is like in USA or Canada, but in Argentina your background is your background, but that doesnt mean they feel like they are english. For instance, im from italian background (my grandparents are italian) and i even have italian nationality since im little, i even voted in all italians elections by mail for years. But i dont feel like im italian, i dont even speak the languaje (granted, my father does, and my grandparents never fully learned spanish and keep talking in italian even when they lived in argentina for more than 50 years), i know im argentinian. I havent even visited Italy. Of course, i know i have family there, and its in my roots, and i would love to go and maybe should learn the languaje, but, aside of having very strong italian food education (my grandma cooked us italian food since we were little, she was an excellent cook), i dont feel like im italian, even when i come from a familiy that clearly haves super strong roots (my grandparents traveled to italy every year). So, i think, aside from the notion that you have a background and maybe familiy in another part of the world, here you behave like an argentinian. Since EVERYONE haves a bakcground here (argentina is a country from inmigrants, so everyone is from somewhere else, lol), it ends up being just a last name and some family habits and not so much more, imo.



About what the guardian says, i have heard the same, and even know 2 spanish young guys that came here from madrid because of the "crisis". I have seen it featured on the news a couple of times. I dont know if its really strong, but maybe some people are coming. Probably spanish that have familiy here, since spanish and italians are the biggest bakcground people here, and they came cause of the languaje and the not-super different culture. But im not sure how big it is, i know it happens to some extent.
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Old 04-05-2012, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
830 posts, read 2,073,793 times
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I agree with Sophie. In general, immigrants here blended with the culture, and people don't speak of "Anglo-Argentines", "Irish-Argentines", "Spanish-Argentines", "Italian-Argentines", "Russian-Argentines", "Mapuche-Argentines", "Guaraní-Argentines", we are just Argentines. As a result of this, through the years immigrants mixed with other immigrants from other countries. So it is not uncommon to find people whose background is mixed, with sometimes four different ancestries. I, myself, am a mixed of Italian, Ukrainian, German, and Mapuche. Of course this is a question of degrees. There are a few immigrant communities that didn't blend in to such an extent, but they are the exceptions. Also, there are the cases of the more "recent" immigrants: Chinese, Corean, Bolivian, Peruvian, and even Senegalese (even more recent). These aren't so much blended into Argentine society yet, but perhaps it's a question of time, or perhaps that their cultures are more different. In the case of Peruvian and Bolivian immigrants I should say that the statement "their cultures are more different" applies when compared to Buenos Aires and the central region of Argentina. However their culture isn't that different from the Argentine culture of the northern provinces, as far as I know.

Well, I'm a bit off topic, but you get what I mean.
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