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Old 06-02-2012, 11:55 PM
 
546 posts, read 1,220,662 times
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Yes, they call her "Lady Botox" and she was once a terrorist, and now she's terrorising all the Argentinian middle class. No, she does not have cancer, but Chavez does, and Chavez is the one guiding her actions with his money.

All the Falklands' thing is stupid, just as the Gibraltar thing here in Spain during Franco. She needs external enemies to arouse the rabble, the descamisados.

In the end, it will happen the same than in Cuba and Venezuela, a desolate third world country and a haven for subsidised cabecitas negras.

Last edited by cojoncillo; 06-03-2012 at 12:12 AM..
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Old 06-03-2012, 12:06 AM
 
1,736 posts, read 1,591,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
Why dont they compromise and make the islands independent of both the UK and Argentina?
Because the population does not want it. Thats why. Duh.
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Old 06-03-2012, 04:44 AM
 
5,663 posts, read 4,374,276 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotorPsico View Post
The British didn't "came". The British invaded a civilized country, exactly like the nazis invaded France.
Just for you..

[quote] In 1764, French navigator and military commander Louis Antoine de Bougainville founded the first settlement on Berkeley Sound, in present-day Port Louis, East Falkland.[19] In 1765, British captain John Byron explored and claimed Saunders Island on West Falkland, where he named the harbour Port Egmont and a settlement was constructed in 1766.[20] Unaware of the French presence, Byron claimed the island group for King George III. Spain acquired the French colony in 1767, and placed it under a governor subordinate to the Buenos Aires colonial administration. In 1770, Spain attacked Port Egmont and expelled the British presence, bringing the two countries to the brink of war. War was avoided by a peace treaty and the British return to Port Egmont.[21]
In 1774, economic pressures leading up to the American Revolutionary War forced Great Britain to withdraw from many overseas settlements.[21][22] Upon withdrawal, the British left behind a plaque asserting Britain's continued claim. Spain maintained its governor until 1806 who, on his departure, left behind a plaque asserting Spanish claims. The remaining settlers were withdrawn in 1811.[21]
In 1820, storm damage forced the privateer Heroína to take shelter in the islands.[23] Her captain David Jewett raised the flag of the United Provinces of the River Plate and read a proclamation claiming the islands.[23] This became public knowledge in Buenos Aires nearly a year later after the proclamation was published in the Salem Gazette.[23] After several failures, Luis Vernet established a settlement in 1828 with authorisation from the Republic of Buenos Aires and from Great Britain.[24] In 1829, after asking for help from Buenos Aires, he was instead proclaimed Military and Civil Commander of the islands.[24] Additionally, Vernet asked the British to protect his settlement if they returned.[25]
A dispute over fishing and hunting rights resulted in a raid by the US warship USS Lexington in 1831.[26][27] The log of the Lexington reports only the destruction of arms and a powder store, but Vernet made a claim for compensation from the US Government stating that the settlement was destroyed.[26] (Compensation was rejected by the US Government of President Cleveland in 1885.) The Islands were declared free from all government, the seven senior members of the settlement were arrested for piracy[28] and taken to Montevideo,[27] where they were released without charge on the orders of Commodore Rogers.[29]
In November 1832, Argentina sent Commander Mestivier as an interim commander to found a penal settlement, but he was killed in a mutiny after four days.[30] The following January, British forces returned and requested the Argentine garrison leave. Don Pinedo, captain of the ARA Sarandi and senior officer present, protested but ultimately complied. Vernet's settlement continued, with the Irishman William Dickson[31] tasked with raising the British flag for passing ships. Vernet's deputy, Matthew Brisbane, returned and was encouraged by the British to continue the enterprise.[32][33][34] The settlement continued until August 1833, when the leaders were killed in the so-called Gaucho murders. Subsequently, from 1834 the islands were governed as a British naval station until 1840 when the British Government decided to establish a permanent colony.[35] [end quote]

[source: Falkland Islands - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ]

This may help clear things up for you a little...
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Old 06-03-2012, 05:39 AM
 
4,454 posts, read 5,743,308 times
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I wonder if Argentina reclaims the islands the people of the islands can maintain the same living standards as their living standards are high for South American standards and there is no one is unemployed there too. In addition there is no case of stealing and it is very clean and it is an question if Argentina can give these islanders this as well.

Plus:

The Falklands are clean and orderly: there is no dirt, no waste products, no insecurity, no stealing and even less violent crime. There is no fast food, neon signs, traffic lights or big supermarkets. In short the Falklands are a haven of peace, the kind of place which is becoming more and more rare these days!
http://www.mysterra.org/webmag/falkl...opulation.html
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Old 06-03-2012, 06:23 AM
 
61 posts, read 56,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baldrick View Post
Just for you..
Wikipedia is edited by anybody. Including you. It is not a trustworthy source.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Baldrick View Post
In 1764, French navigator and military commander Louis Antoine de Bougainville founded the first settlement on Berkeley Sound, in present-day Port Louis, East Falkland.[19] In 1765, British captain John Byron explored and claimed Saunders Island on West Falkland, where he named the harbour Port Egmont and a settlement was constructed in 1766.[20]
But the Falklads already had owners: either Spain because of Utrecht, or France because of his colony.

The British didn't settled in the Falklands, but on an islet at the west of West Falklands.

An islet gives no right over the mainland.

But also it does not gives any right to Britain because Britain signed the Treaty of Utrecht on 1713, which recognizes the Spanish sovereignty, and that's why the British, and French, were expelled.

So, your argument is illegal, contrary to treaties signed by Britain, and even if it were valid, it only would be relevant to Saunder Islet, and not over the Falkland Colonies and isles, which were settled and inhabited before the first British invasion.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Baldrick View Post
Unaware of the French presence, Byron claimed the island group for King George III. Spain acquired the French colony in 1767, and placed it under a governor subordinate to the Buenos Aires colonial administration. In 1770, Spain attacked Port Egmont and expelled the British presence, bringing the two countries to the brink of war. War was avoided by a peace treaty and the British return to Port Egmont.
Because of Utrecht, the islands were Spanish and thus Spain made the rules: it allowed both France and Britain to return, with the purpose of dismantle his settlements, and retire. And that is what Britain and France did: dismantled and retired, except by part of the French colony, which was bought by Spain and continued as a Spanish colony under Buenos Aires government.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Baldrick View Post
In 1774, economic pressures leading up to the American Revolutionary War forced Great Britain to withdraw from many overseas settlements.[21][22] Upon withdrawal, the British left behind a plaque asserting Britain's continued claim.
That claim, only over Saunders islet, and not the Falklands, is illegal because of Utrecht.

And even witouth Utrecht, is invalided again by the treaty of Nookta convention, signed in 1790, which leaves the Falklands, and nearby islands out of reach of Britain.



And even without Utrecht, and without Nookta, Britain NEVER had any settlement on the main island settled by France, Spain and Argentina. None at all. Zero.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Baldrick View Post
Spain maintained its governor until 1806 who, on his departure, left behind a plaque asserting Spanish claims. The remaining settlers were withdrawn in 1811.[21]
At this point Argentina declared independence, on 1816. Since Buenos Aires was the owner of the Falklands, by decision of the King of Spain, then after independence Buenos Aires is the propietary of the islands, and remains the owner.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baldrick View Post
In 1820, storm damage forced the privateer Heroína to take shelter in the islands.[23] Her captain David Jewett raised the flag of the United Provinces of the River Plate and read a proclamation claiming the islands.[23] This became public knowledge in Buenos Aires nearly a year later after the proclamation was published in the Salem Gazette.[23] After several failures, Luis Vernet established a settlement in 1828 with authorisation from the Republic of Buenos Aires and from Great Britain.[24] In 1829, after asking for help from Buenos Aires, he was instead proclaimed Military and Civil Commander of the islands.[24] Additionally, Vernet asked the British to protect his settlement if they returned.[25]
A dispute over fishing and hunting rights resulted in a raid by the US warship USS Lexington in 1831.[26][27] The log of the Lexington reports only the destruction of arms and a powder store, but Vernet made a claim for compensation from the US Government stating that the settlement was destroyed.[26] (Compensation was rejected by the US Government of President Cleveland in 1885.) The Islands were declared free from all government, the seven senior members of the settlement were arrested for piracy[28] and taken to Montevideo,[27] where they were released without charge on the orders of Commodore Rogers.[29]
In November 1832, Argentina sent Commander Mestivier as an interim commander to found a penal settlement, but he was killed in a mutiny after four days.[30] The following January, British forces returned and requested the Argentine garrison leave. Don Pinedo, captain of the ARA Sarandi and senior officer present, protested but ultimately complied. Vernet's settlement continued, with the Irishman William Dickson[31] tasked with raising the British flag for passing ships. Vernet's deputy, Matthew Brisbane, returned and was encouraged by the British to continue the enterprise.[32][33][34] The settlement continued until August 1833, when the leaders were killed in the so-called Gaucho murders. Subsequently, from 1834 the islands were governed as a British naval station until 1840 when the British Government decided to establish a permanent colony.[35] [end quote]

[source: Falkland Islands - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ]

This may help clear things up for you a little...
This is a bunch of lies made on Wikipedia by the British.


Anybody can make an entry on that Wikipedia article saying "Baldrick do not cares for the law", and cite another fake web page as source.

Last edited by MotorPsico; 06-03-2012 at 06:37 AM..
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Old 06-03-2012, 06:27 AM
 
61 posts, read 56,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cry_havoc View Post
Why dont they compromise and make the islands independent of both the UK and Argentina?
Because the UK does not have any right to create a state on other country territory.

Nonetheless, Argentina is willing to find a settlement, and United Nations mandated 48 times (or more) that Britain and Argentina solve this conflict peacefully, but Britain refuses to comply with United Nations mandate.
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Old 06-03-2012, 06:34 AM
 
61 posts, read 56,150 times
Reputation: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by other99 View Post
I wonder if Argentina reclaims the islands the people of the islands can maintain the same living standards as their living standards are high for South American standards and there is no one is unemployed there too. In addition there is no case of stealing and it is very clean and it is an question if Argentina can give these islanders this as well.

Plus:

The Falklands are clean and orderly: there is no dirt, no waste products, no insecurity, no stealing and even less violent crime. There is no fast food, neon signs, traffic lights or big supermarkets. In short the Falklands are a haven of peace, the kind of place which is becoming more and more rare these days!
Falkland Islands - Population - information & pictures
That's not an argument at all. So, if illegal immigrants on USA claim that they want to make some place on USA a foreign state, they have right to rob territory from USA?

No, they are illegals, and USA has sovereign right over his territory, no matter if the invaders are super rich, or live on slums.


(By the way, 40% of newborn on USA are of Latin American origin. It means that 40% of USA citizen will be of Latin American origin.)
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Old 06-03-2012, 08:25 AM
 
5,663 posts, read 4,374,276 times
Reputation: 5614
Quote:
Originally Posted by MotorPsico View Post
Wikipedia is edited by anybody. Including you. It is not a trustworthy source.
Fair enough, so, here are some of the sources that i looked at with regards to the UN Mandates.

From: Special Committee on Decolonization Adopts Draft on Falkland Islands (Malvinas), Requesting Argentina, United Kingdom to Resume Talks as Soon as Possible


General Assembly
GA/COL/3225
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York Special Committee on Decolonization
6th & 7th Meetings (AM & PM)

Special Committee on Decolonization Adopts Draft on Falkland Islands (Malvinas),

RASIE KARGBO (Sierra Leone) said the principle of self-determination was a prime factor in any consideration of the question of the Falkland Islands (Malvinas). The basic principles outlined in resolution 1514 (XV) (1960) formed the basis of the Special Committee’s work. Citing General Assembly resolution 637 (VII), she said the Special Committee was obliged, not only to uphold the principle of self-determination, but to recognize it as a prerequisite for realising fundamental human rights. Any attempt to resolve the issue without taking into full account the wishes of the islanders would be inconsistent with the United Nations Charter and relevant Assembly resolutions.

Here is a link to the Mandate that was recognised by the council: Resolutions : General Assembly (GA), 7th session: United Nations (UN)

Enjoy..
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Old 06-03-2012, 09:59 AM
 
61 posts, read 56,150 times
Reputation: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baldrick View Post
Fair enough, so, here are some of the sources that i looked at with regards to the UN Mandates.

From: Special Committee on Decolonization Adopts Draft on Falkland Islands (Malvinas), Requesting Argentina, United Kingdom to Resume Talks as Soon as Possible


General Assembly
GA/COL/3225
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York Special Committee on Decolonization
6th & 7th Meetings (AM & PM)

Special Committee on Decolonization Adopts Draft on Falkland Islands (Malvinas),

RASIE KARGBO (Sierra Leone) said the principle of self-determination was a prime factor in any consideration of the question of the Falkland Islands (Malvinas). The basic principles outlined in resolution 1514 (XV) (1960) formed the basis of the Special Committee’s work. Citing General Assembly resolution 637 (VII), she said the Special Committee was obliged, not only to uphold the principle of self-determination, but to recognize it as a prerequisite for realising fundamental human rights. Any attempt to resolve the issue without taking into full account the wishes of the islanders would be inconsistent with the United Nations Charter and relevant Assembly resolutions.

Here is a link to the Mandate that was recognised by the council: Resolutions : General Assembly (GA), 7th session: United Nations (UN)

Enjoy..
That's a just draft of the British side.
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Old 06-03-2012, 11:55 AM
 
5,663 posts, read 4,374,276 times
Reputation: 5614
Quote:
Originally Posted by MotorPsico View Post
That's a just draft of the British side.
What? Did you read it? It's a release from the U.N! How the hell is that the "British side"?

You have the details you need to look up the the Mandate for yourself. Show me the document released by the U.N showing another version that would vindicate your statement of this being a "British" version.

This is the department you need to go through. - Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Or you can request a copy of the document from: Contact the United Nations

This is the document you will need to request: GA/COL/3225

Be sure to ask for the non "British" version of the document.

Special Committee on Decolonization Adopts Draft on Falkland Islands (Malvinas), Requesting Argentina, United Kingdom to Resume Talks as Soon as Possible
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