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Old 08-25-2013, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Caribbean
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Ghana, it seems...

Quote:
Coromantee (derived from the name of the Ghanaian coastal town "Kormantse"), also called Coromantins, Coromanti or Kormantine was the English name given to Akan slaves from the Gold Coast or modern-day Ghana. The term Coromantee is now considered archaic as it simply refers to Akan people, and was primarily used in the Caribbean. Coromantins actually came from several Akan ethnic groups Ashanti, Fanti, Akyem, etc. presumably taken as war captives. Owing to their militaristic background and common Akan language, Coromantins organized dozens of slave rebellions in Jamaica and elsewhere in the Caribbean. Their fierce, rebellious nature became so notorious among white plantation owners in the 18th century that an Act was proposed to ban the importation of people from the Gold Coast despite their reputation as strong workers. The Akans had the single largest African cultural influence on Jamaica, including Jamaican Maroons whose culture and language was seen as a derivation of Akan.Names of some notable Coromantee leaders such as Cudjoe, Quamin, Cuffy, and Quamina correspond to Akan day names Kojo, Kwame, Kofi, and Kwabena, respectively.
Ghana Rising: Coromantee : The Akan Warriors of the New World….

Quote:
More than 1 million slaves are estimated to have been transported directly from Africa to Jamaica during the period of slavery; of these, 200,000 were reexported to other places in the Americas. During the 17th and 18th centuries, the Akan, Ga, and Adangbe from the northwestern coastal region known as the Gold Coast (around modern Ghana) dominated the slave trade to the island. Not until 1776 did slaves imported from other parts of Africa-Igbos from the Bight of Biafra (southern modern Nigeria) and Kongos from Central Africa-outnumber slaves from the Gold Coast. But slaves from these regions represented 46 percent of the total number of slaves.
http://www.hartford-hwp.com/archives/43/130.htm

So it seems that 54% of all Africans brought to Jamaica were of Ghanian background and the rest a mixture of Nigerians and Congolese background.

 
Old 08-25-2013, 10:25 AM
 
6,932 posts, read 8,083,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardsyzzurphands View Post
As with basically every African nation there are hundreds spoken. But what does that have to do with the conversation at hand?

Either way it is not surprising I can pick up on it (along with many Nigerians and yardies I know) and not yourself. You have to be familiar with either language to find the similarities and you most likely don't have an ear for that?
I'm familiar with both. I just don't find the similarities.

 
Old 08-25-2013, 11:37 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
I'm familiar with both. I just don't find the similarities.

It's clear you can't find the similarities, we've already established that. It doesn't mean they don't exist, it just means you don't have an ear for these things.
 
Old 08-26-2013, 12:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post



Really?
Yes it does. I know some Jamaicans that identify with and claim indigenous Native American heritage. The Native Americans have an impact on the island.

Plus it has survived and carried on among the various maroon groups of Jamaica. IJS
 
Old 08-26-2013, 07:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ObscureOpulence View Post
Yes it does. I know some Jamaicans that identify with and claim indigenous Native American heritage. The Native Americans have an impact on the island.

Plus it has survived and carried on among the various maroon groups of Jamaica. IJS

There isn't any evidence of indigenous influence on Jamaica genetically, linguistically, or culturally. Most Jamaicans are not descendants of the Maroons. The Maroons inhabited the island during Spain's control of the island. The vast majority of Jamaicans are descendants of slaves that were imported by the British during the last decades of the 1700s entering the early 1800s.
 
Old 08-26-2013, 08:32 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
There isn't any evidence of indigenous influence on Jamaica genetically, linguistically, or culturally. Most Jamaicans are not descendants of the Maroons. The Maroons inhabited the island during Spain's control of the island. The vast majority of Jamaicans are descendants of slaves that were imported by the British during the last decades of the 1700s entering the early 1800s.
While the Taino's were completely annihilated by the Spanish and there are no documented communities alive today that does not mean there was no influence culturally. Taino culture influenced our folk traditions, growing seasons, food and agricultural practices which are evident even today.
 
Old 08-26-2013, 09:02 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardsyzzurphands View Post
While the Taino's were completely annihilated by the Spanish and there are no documented communities alive today that does not mean there was no influence culturally. Taino culture influenced our folk traditions, growing seasons, food and agricultural practices which are evident even today.

Source or examples?
 
Old 08-26-2013, 09:09 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
Source or examples?
The significance of milk in the Maasai culture

The bottom of the article has direct references as well quoted.
 
Old 08-28-2013, 05:03 PM
 
578 posts, read 755,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
There isn't any evidence of indigenous influence on Jamaica genetically, linguistically, or culturally. Most Jamaicans are not descendants of the Maroons. The Maroons inhabited the island during Spain's control of the island. The vast majority of Jamaicans are descendants of slaves that were imported by the British during the last decades of the 1700s entering the early 1800s.
Your missing the point and nothing you said challenged my claim or addressed what I was intending to say.

For clarification, I was trying to state the fact that Jamaica is influenced by Tainos and that many of the maroon groups are conservators of the Taino/Arawak/Carib/Ciboney and Native American traditions of the island. The influence of the Tainos exists in the food and some words as well as even the jargon patwa language that Jamaicans speak.

I'm not saying that the Tainos are predominant, I'm certainly not saying that, but I do know that it has an influence in the island, often subtle. When you dig deeper and look at the things that remain of the indigenous influences it's pretty interesting.

I had link that mentions the remnants of indigenous traditions that exist in some aspects of the island culture and it was interesting to see. If I find it I will post it here for reference.
 
Old 08-28-2013, 05:05 PM
 
578 posts, read 755,682 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
There isn't any evidence of indigenous influence on Jamaica genetically, linguistically, or culturally. Most Jamaicans are not descendants of the Maroons. The Maroons inhabited the island during Spain's control of the island. The vast majority of Jamaicans are descendants of slaves that were imported by the British during the last decades of the 1700s entering the early 1800s.
There is no dispute that most Jamaicans have at least some African ancestry though. Jamaica is a diverse island, and it's very mixed as well.
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