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Old 06-10-2012, 12:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post

Erasure, in the US it's very important to choose well the community in which you live, for the quality of the school. But even that doesn't guarantee good (or any) instruction in grammar, writing and literature reading skills.
I know that much ( in terms of the community where I live,) and it's a nice community, actually. Local teachers ( at least in few schools where my son was) come across as very intelligent and dedicated people for the most part, but it's the whole thing of superficial approach to education, the belief that children can be successfully taught while reading internet, news-papers and entertaining books with no drilling and *boring* academia in sight - that's what brings the whole system of education to the point of lowest denomination.
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Old 06-10-2012, 01:09 PM
 
775 posts, read 993,843 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I'm jealous! You scored, literature-education-wise! Where did you go to school?
Upstate NY, about an hour north of NYC.

It's hard to believe that the education I received is an anomaly in the US, because my district was nowhere near the top. It's in a pretty good neighborhood too, but our scores compared to national averages weren't that great. The thought that the norm might actually be less than my just so-so education makes me sad.

Last edited by luckynumber4; 06-10-2012 at 01:32 PM..
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Old 06-10-2012, 01:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by FromEverywhere View Post
I was wondering how the rest of the world views Americans. What comes to mind? Also what have been your experiences? Do they reinforce the stereotype or do the opposite?

I'm a well-traveled, open-minded and cultured American, so I won't be offended by what anyone says.
The USA has the makers and the takers.
They've grown too many takers (called entitlement monsters) and this trend is collapsing the country.
They are through taxes and socialism to end makers, which is why the whole thing is fizzling out.
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Old 06-10-2012, 01:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckynumber4 View Post
Upstate NY, about and hour north of NYC.

It's hard to believe that the education I received is an anomaly in the US, because my district was nowhere near the top. It's in a pretty good neighborhood too, but our scores compared to national averages weren't that great. The thought that the norm might actually be less than my just so-so education makes me sad.
Your school could have been doing OK in literature and language department but was lagging behind in math and science.
My son's high school on another hand ( well actually all of them, starting with elementary school and middle school being the biggest waste of time,) were particularly bad in humanities, but picked up in math and science by the tenth grade.

Last edited by erasure; 06-10-2012 at 01:54 PM..
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Old 06-10-2012, 01:28 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckynumber4 View Post
Upstate NY, about and hour north of NYC.

It's hard to believe that the education I received is an anomaly in the US, because my district was nowhere near the top. It's in a pretty good neighborhood too, but our scores compared to national averages weren't that great. The thought that the norm might actually be less than my just so-so education makes me sad.
It's possible NY is different. I've read about the teacher training at NY universities, and it's quite rigorous. It makes teacher training on the West Coast look like a pathetic joke.

I've been very impressed with Russian pedagogical training, btw.
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Old 06-10-2012, 01:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by erasure View Post
collectivism behind Russians as a nation
Common misconception, Russians are extremely individualist. In a SU social responsibility was strong, which may be mistaken for collectivism. It vanished overnight two decades ago.

Friendship/hospitality trait and traditions probably appeared, because Russians had low population density (huge territory), and were happy to meet all travellers and friends from "nearby" villages.
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Old 06-10-2012, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 5,792,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckynumber4 View Post
Upstate NY, about an hour north of NYC.

It's hard to believe that the education I received is an anomaly in the US, because my district was nowhere near the top. It's in a pretty good neighborhood too, but our scores compared to national averages weren't that great. The thought that the norm might actually be less than my just so-so education makes me sad.
One thing that strikes me as a difference is how different Americans make out one school in one city/district as compared to another to be (from hearing about it secondhand, since I never attended schools in the US) -- in Canada, schools are funded at the provincial level so the curriculum is more standardized for the cities within a province. We also don't have as much of a standardized testing culture or "school vs. school" thing going on.

Is there really so much variation in what one public school teaches, what textbooks it uses, what are the expectations for passing each grade etc. to another, just a mile away or something?
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Old 06-10-2012, 02:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by russiaonline View Post
Common misconception, Russians are extremely individualist. In a SU social responsibility was strong, which may be mistaken for collectivism. It vanished overnight two decades ago.
You think so? Then learn a bit about the cultural background of your own country.

mir, former Russian peasant community — Infoplease.com

Russian collectivism goes much further back than just Soviet system.
All this "individualism" and money-making oriented culture brought in the nineties is precisely what's destroying Russia, that's why she is basically dying slow and painful death.
What works for the US, the idea on which they are based ( and thrive,) with core values natural for their culture was/is lethal for Russia.

PS. This sense of collectivism didn't really "vanish" - it was rigorously stomped out by the new ruling class within the last twenty years.
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Old 06-10-2012, 05:18 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
Is there really so much variation in what one public school teaches, what textbooks it uses, what are the expectations for passing each grade etc. to another, just a mile away or something?
I think each state uses the same textbooks. But what classes get taught, whether or not new textbooks are available to each class or old ones have to be reused, whether musical instruments are available or even whether music is taught, what kind of supplies and "enrichment" programs and classes, if any, are available, can vary enormously from one district to another. A nephew of mine was passed from one grade to the next even though he wasn't learning how to read. My brother took him out of that school and found another one that gave more individual attention, and he thrived.

Standardizing everything at the state level makes sense, but schools are paid for by local taxes, not state taxes, if I have that straight.
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Old 06-10-2012, 05:31 PM
 
Location: American Expat
2,189 posts, read 4,715,191 times
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A couple of weeks ago abroad, I had somebody argue with me about birthright citizenship .. He tried to tell me not everybody born in the U.S. is a U.S. citizen and you have to have a green card or something..lmao. He wouldn't believe me when I told him that's not the case.
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