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Old 06-11-2012, 02:48 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,541 posts, read 70,455,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
one thing i especially like about americans is that they appreciate talent , they dont try and knock down capable people , quite the opposite , their not envious of people who are successfull
One thing I noticed about the US compared to some European countries is that anyone with true talent can get ahead no matter what their education. Foreign visitors I've hosted have sometimes asked about this or that friend's qualifications for doing what they're doing, meaning: what relevant university degree did they have. The answer in one case, which surprised everyone, was that she only had a high school education. But she was a talented designer, and was able to show her work in stores and galleries. Apparently in some parts of the country you have to show a degree in design or art in order to get a store or gallery owner to even consider speaking to you and looking at your work.
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Old 06-11-2012, 02:54 PM
 
Location: La Cañada
459 posts, read 605,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Europeans think American tourists dress in sloppy clothes. A couple of friends of mine dressed nicely when they went to Europe. The woman wore heels, not the comfortable walking shoes that other American women wear. Everyone thought the couple were European. They were shocked to hear American English coming out of their mouths, because the way they were dressed didn't fit the stereotype.
I've heard that. In a school trip to England and some other countries, I was the only one not wearing sweats or jeans day in and day out. I actually dressed nicely for when we went out.

I suppose we as a nation are too casual for Europeans. I still dress nicely almost anywhere.
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Old 06-11-2012, 03:13 PM
 
Location: La Cañada
459 posts, read 605,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Joshua View Post
Just trying to keep it real Acajack.

It may be only the Quebecois, but I spend a lot of time on the Maine coast and you can always tell the Canadians by how poorly they dress and by the banana hammocks the men wear on the beach, heck they even wear them when they are not on the beach. Parents almost have to shield their children's eyes. Can you say mons pubis?
On a tiny sidenote, it seems like they have the misconception that all Americans dress that way (that being extremely informal), so "let's do it ourselves!" And then they contribute to it, later complaining of it.
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Old 06-12-2012, 03:36 PM
 
15,029 posts, read 13,618,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by russiaonline View Post
By that measure how collectivist America is, with all of its non family businesses?
I am not sure I understand your question, but if you are asking about sense of "collectivism" in the US - sure, it exists as well, because it's a strong sentiment among the liberal part of population. (America has two forces, two different ideas that govern the society, that's why there is American "right" and there is American "left" - I hope you know it, because some Russians don't see any difference between those two parties representing different forces in the US.) You can say in many ways the same thing about Russia, because in spite of being originally the country of "left, communal ideas," it was at the same time one of the most reactionary forces in Europe, ruled by ultra-right ideas. Post-Soviet Russia turned to the same ( "right") ideas once again, while America took the "left" turn during the last presidential elections.
While it all might be the case, the original roots, the cultural foundation of America is still "right" in its nature, while the true "left" idea belongs to Russia.


Quote:
It vanished almost overnight before my own eyes. Except that there was no collectivism to speak of, only social responsibility.
Social responsibility IS foundation of collectivism.
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Old 06-12-2012, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
8,619 posts, read 8,525,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
One thing I noticed about the US compared to some European countries is that anyone with true talent can get ahead no matter what their education. Foreign visitors I've hosted have sometimes asked about this or that friend's qualifications for doing what they're doing, meaning: what relevant university degree did they have. The answer in one case, which surprised everyone, was that she only had a high school education. But she was a talented designer, and was able to show her work in stores and galleries. Apparently in some parts of the country you have to show a degree in design or art in order to get a store or gallery owner to even consider speaking to you and looking at your work.

Without sounding like I am bragging, I use myself as an example of this...I am age 50 ,have only a high school education + some time in the US Navy as an Aircraft Mechanic/ Flt Engineer. I am currently employed as the Power Plant Construction and Operations Manager for a Midwest electrical utility. I am currently in charge of all phase of construction of a 30 million NG fired facility in the upper Midwest. I have numerous degreed engineers working for me on the project.....I feel blessed to comment that I make over 6 figures in salary and have an outstanding benefit package....IT can be done!!!!!
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Old 06-12-2012, 06:36 PM
 
14,752 posts, read 28,600,845 times
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My experience is anything but typical. I am a California native, born to European immigrants. My first language is not English. My parents often used the term "American" to denote a WASP who had no cultural ties to Europe and was totally ok with that. I really enjoy knowing foreigners. So many of my friends had parents from other countries, and we would take turns imitating each others' parents' accents...all in good fun.

I have had great experiences traveling overseas. Since my big hobby is languages, I generally travel to countries where I speak the language and am very well-received. They say you get what you put out. This then makes me wonder why I can make friends in Portugal or in Uruguay (like being invited into people's homes) and, in Pacific Northwest suburbs, I didn't know my neighbors.
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Old 06-12-2012, 08:59 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,541 posts, read 70,455,727 times
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The not-knowing-your-neighbors thing in the US is weird. In the neighborhood where I grew up in the Bay Area, the neighbors socialized together, they were friends. Times have changed. Society went through a highly mobile phase, where people would move if their job required it, or to find a better job. Those community ties got broken along with the whole custom of "being neighborly".

But robert, Latin people are friendlier in general. They're a warmer people than German-descended people (incl. Brit-descended). Generally speaking.
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Old 06-12-2012, 09:04 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,352,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
The not-knowing-your-neighbors thing in the US is weird. In the neighborhood where I grew up in the Bay Area, the neighbors socialized together, they were friends. Times have changed. Society went through a highly mobile phase, where people would move if their job required it, or to find a better job. Those community ties got broken along with the whole custom of "being neighborly".

But robert, Latin people are friendlier in general. They're a warmer people than German-descended people (incl. Brit-descended). Generally speaking.
This is the case in Australia too, although it depends on the particular community and sometimes how open you are to socialising or making casual acquaintance with neighbours. We know a few of our neighbours, although it's pretty common to not know your neighbours at all. Recently a South African family moved next door, and they visited us to say hello and give us some chocolates...I don't think any neighbour has ever done that before so I wonder if that sort of thing is more common in S. Africa. On American movies I always thought it was nice how people would give the new neighbours a pie or somethiing as a gesture of welcome to the neighbourhood, but I'm sure that is the exception rather than the rule and not so common nowadays.
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Old 06-13-2012, 02:20 AM
 
1,730 posts, read 1,703,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
I am not sure I understand your question, but if you are asking about sense of "collectivism" in the US - sure, it exists as well, because it's a strong sentiment among the liberal part of population.
Corporations are a strong example of collectivism. Most leftist ideas are quite individualist.

Quote:
Social responsibility IS foundation of collectivism.
Sure, but most people understand collectivism as a shared ownership, so I guess this can be considered a down to Earth definition.

Anyway, no matter what definition you use, Russians have a lot less collectivism than Americans and Europeans. If someone disagrees at least a tiny bit, then he got no idea how Russia even looks today (beyond the main streets). Individualism really shows.
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Old 06-13-2012, 05:33 AM
 
7,148 posts, read 7,964,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
One thing I noticed about the US compared to some European countries is that anyone with true talent can get ahead no matter what their education. Foreign visitors I've hosted have sometimes asked about this or that friend's qualifications for doing what they're doing, meaning: what relevant university degree did they have. The answer in one case, which surprised everyone, was that she only had a high school education. But she was a talented designer, and was able to show her work in stores and galleries. Apparently in some parts of the country you have to show a degree in design or art in order to get a store or gallery owner to even consider speaking to you and looking at your work.
the majority of people are not exceptionally talented though , america appears to forget about average joes sometimes
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