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Old 06-13-2012, 05:35 AM
 
7,148 posts, read 7,964,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
The not-knowing-your-neighbors thing in the US is weird. In the neighborhood where I grew up in the Bay Area, the neighbors socialized together, they were friends. Times have changed. Society went through a highly mobile phase, where people would move if their job required it, or to find a better job. Those community ties got broken along with the whole custom of "being neighborly".

But robert, Latin people are friendlier in general. They're a warmer people than German-descended people (incl. Brit-descended). Generally speaking.
not knowing your neighbours is by no means an american thing , this happens in the majority of urban areas the world over and increasingly so in rural areas
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Old 06-13-2012, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,144,182 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
not knowing your neighbours is by no means an american thing , this happens in the majority of urban areas the world over and increasingly so in rural areas
Good point. I've been living in various countries for 12-13 years, and never known any of my neighbors.
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Old 06-13-2012, 04:31 PM
 
15,033 posts, read 13,618,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by russiaonline View Post
Corporations are a strong example of collectivism.
Huh? Number of individuals striking deals with each with a goal of even bigger profits in mind is what you consider "collectivism?"? How peculiar.

Quote:
Sure, but most people understand collectivism as a shared ownership,
"Shared ownership" does not necessarily mean "collectivism." Soviet government for example didn't "share" ownership with anyone, yet collectivism was clearly present back in Soviet times.

Quote:
Anyway, no matter what definition you use, Russians have a lot less collectivism than Americans and Europeans.
Of course it's a cut-throat society, with mafia setting the laws - be that business or anything else, so obviously today's Russia is a less civilized society in this respect than Europe or even the US.

Last edited by erasure; 06-13-2012 at 05:38 PM..
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Old 06-14-2012, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Kowaniec, Nowy Targ, Podhale. 666 m n.p.m.
371 posts, read 841,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
"Shared ownership" does not necessarily mean "collectivism." Soviet government for example didn't "share" ownership with anyone, yet collectivism was clearly present back in Soviet times. .
Soviet government was a wee bit like running a modern-day banking establishment nowadays; privatize the profits, collectivize the losses...
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Old 06-14-2012, 10:18 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,558 posts, read 70,455,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Proterra View Post
Soviet government was a wee bit like running a modern-day banking establishment nowadays; privatize the profits, collectivize the losses...
And we all know how well that worked out...
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Old 06-16-2012, 11:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Proterra View Post
Soviet government was a wee bit like running a modern-day banking establishment nowadays; privatize the profits, collectivize the losses...
Err.. who said there were "profits" under the Soviet system? Everything has been so heavily subsidized by the government, that it doesn't make much sense to talk about profits to begin with.
So still, bringing an example of "collectivization" of modern-day banking/corporations doesn't make much sense.

Last edited by erasure; 06-16-2012 at 11:33 AM..
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Old 06-16-2012, 11:26 AM
 
Location: southern california
55,647 posts, read 74,585,953 times
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fancy that why u r just like me. well traveled cultured educated people that use the work stereotype alot.
im american too but people keep saying i look like this.

http://www.google.com/imgres?start=1...:10,s:172,i:36
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Old 06-16-2012, 11:38 AM
 
15,033 posts, read 13,618,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
fancy that why u r just like me. well traveled cultured educated people that use the work stereotype alot.
im american too but people keep saying i look like this.

Google Image Result for http://www.skjoldlodge.com/images/trolls/BIG/dam_troll.jpg
Oh my... you might reconsider your whole outfit...
And those highlights in your hair got to go...
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Old 06-21-2012, 06:24 AM
 
1,730 posts, read 1,703,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
Huh? Number of individuals striking deals with each with a goal of even bigger profits in mind is what you consider "collectivism?"? How peculiar.
Corporation = lots of individuals working together to pursue some goal

Quote:
"Shared ownership" does not necessarily mean "collectivism." Soviet government for example didn't "share" ownership with anyone, yet collectivism was clearly present back in Soviet times.
You've got a very wrong idea of Soviet economy. Despite some very serious capitalist system, there was A LOT of shared ownership in there.

But the roots of Soviet collectivism were much more complex, I believe.

And, of course, USSR wasn't even remotely as collectivist as Americans (including some truly idiotic Soviet Americans ) believe.

Quote:
Of course it's a cut-throat society, with mafia setting the laws - be that business or anything else, so obviously today's Russia is a less civilized society in this respect than Europe or even the US.
I can't see any mafia in Russia. Neither do other people - except for some criminals, maybe. 1990's are long gone.

Unless you call democratically (much more so than in the U.S.) elected government - mafia
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Old 10-29-2014, 03:40 PM
 
1 posts, read 408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2cold View Post
I'm an American whose parents were born in Europe, and I grew up spending time in American neighborhoods filled with people who emigrated from several European nations.
Just wanted to say that some of those people sure did talk loud, and waved their hands around a lot.
It just makes me wonder - those stereotypical Americans the Europeans complain about, where did their parents, grandparents and great grandparents come from? Were they from one of those European countries where people talk a lot, and loudly, and gesticulate?
I'm American born, American raised, and waving around my hands is considered a hobby of mine. My mom says it's from my Italian heritage, but half of my blood line is Russian and Polish. I'm quite aware of my background. My grandfather on my father's side was 100% Russian and my grandfather on my mother's side is 100% Polish, therefore I'm 1/4 Polish and 1/4 Russian. I'm also French, German, Italian, Irish, African (north), Native American, and about five other countries that I can't remember off the top of my head (because I only got about 5 hours of sleep last night ). So unless any of these other countries has a habit of waving their arms around for emphasis or just in general in their conversations, I'm going to have to stick with the minuscule Italian blood I have.
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