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Old 06-09-2014, 06:16 AM
 
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here is an interesting documentary




 
Old 06-09-2014, 12:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TerryCarr View Post
here is an interesting documentary



And I assume that the Cubans didn't need a translator. They just zoomed right into the local lingo, or at a minimum Krio.

African culture is often reduced to drumming. Why I wonder? The fact that some one might remember a drumming style passed on to them by an elder doesn't make them an African.

FYI. I don't need a translator in that village because I understand Krio. Does that make me an African? NO! It makes me a Caribbean person who has strong African influences within his Caribbean culture.
 
Old 06-09-2014, 12:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TerryCarr View Post
africa is not one culture some people just ask for money if you are gonna take a pic of them
they do sacrifice and in sometimes drink the blood in Cuba



OK so in Cuba they sacrifice as in many parts of the Caribbean. They do libations in Guyana as they do throughout West Africa. Kwekwe, modeled after West African wedding ceremonies also exists in Guyana.

Interesting cultural retentions, but not enough to claim that either Cuban or Guyanese blacks are "African".


Ancestral worship and a strong belief in spiritualism is wide spread throughout West Africa, The specifics might differ, but the general principle is there.


You go searching for specific areas where there is over lap. Does it not dawn on you that if you took a Cuban black to Spain there will also be many areas of cultural overlap?

This doesn't make the Cuban black "Spanish" any more than the areas of overlap make him "African".


The reality is that he is of a "creole" Cuban culture which represents strong Spanish and African influences, and that fact renders him neither.
 
Old 06-10-2014, 12:47 AM
 
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Originally Posted by caribny View Post
OK so in Cuba they sacrifice as in many parts of the Caribbean. They do libations in Guyana as they do throughout West Africa. Kwekwe, modeled after West African wedding ceremonies also exists in Guyana.

Interesting cultural retentions, but not enough to claim that either Cuban or Guyanese blacks are "African".


Ancestral worship and a strong belief in spiritualism is wide spread throughout West Africa, The specifics might differ, but the general principle is there.


You go searching for specific areas where there is over lap. Does it not dawn on you that if you took a Cuban black to Spain there will also be many areas of cultural overlap?

This doesn't make the Cuban black "Spanish" any more than the areas of overlap make him "African".


The reality is that he is of a "creole" Cuban culture which represents strong Spanish and African influences, and that fact renders him neither.
African religions are dieing since imperialism they are more popular in the new world than in most west African nations. Christianity is supreme nowadays. unless it's Togo
 
Old 06-10-2014, 01:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TerryCarr View Post
African religions are dieing since imperialism they are more popular in the new world than in most west African nations. Christianity is supreme nowadays. unless it's Togo


I have actually been into Nigerian and Ghanaian churches as there are many right here in NYC. Believe me those churches are very "African" with all of the talk about demons and people "catching the spirit", and very vibrant dancing in the church.

And as I said drumming and religion aren't all what being African is about.

We descendants of the Trans Atlantic slave trade need to understand something. Though we may have various degrees of African cultural retentions, we are descended from Africa, but we are no longer African.

And the Africans have great fun when we think otherwise.

An African will ask you what African language you speak and what "tribe" do you belong to and traditions that you celebrate? And traditions aren't just drumming, dancing, slitting a fowl's throat, or pouring liquor on the ground. All things that a "westernized" black can easily do.

It also includes the notion that marriage isn't about love. Its about a contractual obligation, so if a wife predeceases her husband (especially in child bearing ages) the wife's family has to "replace" her. Its about a mother telling a son that he must get rid of his wife is she cannot produce a son. And many other things.

Now how many black Cuban females do you think will put up with that?
 
Old 06-10-2014, 01:04 AM
 
75 posts, read 86,061 times
Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
And I assume that the Cubans didn't need a translator. They just zoomed right into the local lingo, or at a minimum Krio.

African culture is often reduced to drumming. Why I wonder? The fact that some one might remember a drumming style passed on to them by an elder doesn't make them an African.

FYI. I don't need a translator in that village because I understand Krio. Does that make me an African? NO! It makes me a Caribbean person who has strong African influences within his Caribbean culture.
i never said they were "African" you make it out if like they have no/little African connection what so ever and it's some scary "voodoo" place.
 
Old 06-10-2014, 01:12 AM
 
7,877 posts, read 6,248,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TerryCarr View Post
i never said they were "African" you make it out if like they have no/little African connection what so ever and it's some scary "voodoo" place.

It can be scary if you don't know what you are doing. I went on a tour and some one was taking pictures of some people dancing. The people demanded the camera and the guide had to do some very fast talking, and we had to leave IMMEDIATELY!

We were then told that the people thought that we would anger their ancestors and bring hardship on them.

We western blacks saw people dancing and found it interesting. They were actually performing some kind of devotion to the ancestors to stave off illness. This was in Sierra Leone and NOT in a village either.

Assuming because we are black, we have the same reference points as they do can be a SERIOUS mistake.
 
Old 06-10-2014, 01:27 AM
 
75 posts, read 86,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
I have actually been into Nigerian and Ghanaian churches as there are many right here in NYC. Believe me those churches are very "African" with all of the talk about demons and people "catching the spirit", and very vibrant dancing in the church.

And as I said drumming and religion aren't all what being African is about.

We descendants of the Trans Atlantic slave trade need to understand something. Though we may have various degrees of African cultural retentions, we are descended from Africa, but we are no longer African.

And the Africans have great fun when we think otherwise.

An African will ask you what African language you speak and what "tribe" do you belong to and traditions that you celebrate? And traditions aren't just drumming, dancing, slitting a fowl's throat, or pouring liquor on the ground. All things that a "westernized" black can easily do.

It also includes the notion that marriage isn't about love. Its about a contractual obligation, so if a wife predeceases her husband (especially in child bearing ages) the wife's family has to "replace" her. Its about a mother telling a son that he must get rid of his wife is she cannot produce a son. And many other things.

Now how many black Cuban females do you think will put up with that?
Yoruba is used in some places (Cuba, T&T, etc) for religious reasons


how common is this marriage thing nowadays?

black American churches do similar stuff & the Pentecostals in general
 
Old 06-10-2014, 01:42 AM
 
75 posts, read 86,061 times
Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
It can be scary if you don't know what you are doing. I went on a tour and some one was taking pictures of some people dancing. The people demanded the camera and the guide had to do some very fast talking, and we had to leave IMMEDIATELY!

We were then told that the people thought that we would anger their ancestors and bring hardship on them.

We western blacks saw people dancing and found it interesting. They were actually performing some kind of devotion to the ancestors to stave off illness. This was in Sierra Leone and NOT in a village either.

Assuming because we are black, we have the same reference points as they do can be a SERIOUS mistake.
Sierra Leone is dirt even by African standers it depends on where you go. these people don't seem to mind

"What is your name?" - African tribe children in Ethiopia - YouTube


The Mursi Tribe The Wildest of the Wild - YouTube
 
Old 06-10-2014, 12:03 PM
 
7,877 posts, read 6,248,725 times
Reputation: 4099
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerryCarr View Post
Yoruba is used in some places (Cuba, T&T, etc) for religious reasons


how common is this marriage thing nowadays?

black American churches do similar stuff & the Pentecostals in general


One of the things that westernized black women find out when they marry African men is that the concept of marriage is VERY different from what they are accustomed to. Indeed the very "westernized" Nigerian who they meet becomes very "traditional" on visits with the family. African tradition is STRONG.

I am fully aware of spirit possession in Pentecostal churches. You do know that your fellow countrymen in the Appalachian regions also do the same thing, that by itself isn't "African".


I can assure you that a Cuban with Santeria and a Trinidadian with Orisha/Shango Baptist will never be as African as a Nigerian who is evangelical. As I tell you, and you don't understand, being "African" is a total thing. Not just drumming, or praying to deities.


We have retained different ASPECTS of African culture. How much depends on the person, the context, their socio-economic status, and the society in which they are raised. But we are a fundamental Western peoples in most instances, the probably exceptions being the maroon communities and very rural parts of Haiti.

While many educated Africans have become superficially Western, often enough to function well when they migrate, once you get to the innards of their families there are deep traditions which must be adhered to. Which we free spirited westernized blacks don't quite understand. No matter how often we pray to Oggun, or beat drums, or pour libations, or chante "axe axe".

My sister lived in Nigeria for a year and there are stories which she can tell you. And not all having to do with the scant regard for human rights and the blatant corruption, which are features of post independent Nigeria, quite likely rooted in its colonial history.
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