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Old 06-22-2014, 06:32 PM
 
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I think the problem is that some AAs may be made to FEEL LIKE aliens in their own country so some get Afro-Centric and run to
Ghana only to be called "white" or obruni..

But in Ghana, they ARE aliens and have more in common culturally with racists like Clive Bundy...Alienation in America has done
a good job..

 
Old 06-23-2014, 07:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
In some instances its because people don't know what you will do with the photos and indeed NO WHERE in the Caribbean will I suggest that any one takes a photo of a person without permission.

In Africa we were told that in the rural areas they fear that the spirits might be trapped in the camera and the ancestors will wreak revenge on them. If one persists the very people who were so hospitable will break your camera to protect themselves.

There is also a pervasive paranoia about demons.

We westerners don't understand this, so when some one visits a village, is well treated and then assumes that they can live there, the disappointment to follow will be dire, once they begin to understand that these people have a non Western, and at times pre scientific, perspective on many things.

We are called a variety of names behind our backs, most suggesting that we are "white". Not physically of course, but culturally as we are so Western.

So when I hear some one marveling about how "African" Cuban blacks are because they drum I chuckle.


Carib

The "afrocuban", toque de santo, etc...is now a thing for tourists in Cuba, also a big industry, but nothing serious or constitutive of official Cuba, just folklore for tourists. Tourists love all that stuff, so they love to go to Toques de Santo in places no cuban would touch with a ten foot pole.

I've seen northen europeans become "santos", really, reminds me a lot to spain back in the 60's with gypsies.

Americans do get paranoid in a place like Centro Habana or Habana Vieja, they see themseleves surrounded by blacks and they just get scared stiff. Canadians don't care, but the government says they are cheapos.
 
Old 07-20-2014, 04:41 AM
 
75 posts, read 86,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
All of these dance moves are African, unlike the highly Euro influenced moves of those middle class Angolans. The music is represents the re importation of music sent to the Americas, where it under went some transformation.

I am not sure if African women are allowed to dance in close contact with men in the traditional villages. That is a western thing.

What is your point I wonder?
no more "African" then this dance


or this


and semba is not some middle class thing it's the national music
 
Old 07-23-2014, 05:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TerryCarr View Post
African religions are dieing since imperialism they are more popular in the new world than in most west African nations. Christianity is supreme nowadays. unless it's Togo



In Cuba, black religion, called "santería" by some and "brujería" (withcraft) for others is not dying. Communist tried to erradicate the "superstition", along with Catholicism, but they could not.

Santeria is now a thriving business, and the most important santeros are white and very rich, they charge astronomical amounts to grant the title of "Saint".

Sometimes I see North Europeans dressed as Saints in the Airports...a business that generates millions, but it's a disgusting relegion because they kill animals in public places, throw food to the sea, and conclusing, makes them loose money,,a religion.
 
Old 07-23-2014, 05:11 AM
 
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Originally Posted by DginnWonder View Post
Statistics and personal anecdotes are all you need to answer that question. The entire island of Saint Martin is over 85% White/European. That's pretty white, especially when you compare that to Cuba's demographics, which state that over 60 to 70% of its population is "light-skinned."

Notice it is "Light-skinned," not White. "light-skinned" is a VERY open term, and can encompass just about everyone, depending on who's answering.

And one doesn't need to go to Europe to know Europe is overwhelmingly white.

Sir, a lot of these things we're arguing about is common sense. Europe is pretty white, and demographics indicate that so is Saint Martin, especially compared to Cuba. In fact, there are multiple reports that indicate that the country is much "darker" than the demographics implies, but that has little to do with this conversation.

And Hialeah is over 90% white, so I don't know what you bringing up some city in Florida has to do with any of this...?

Speaking of, WHAT exactly is your obsession with the place? We're talking about HAVANA, CUBA here. THANKS!

Saint Martin does not practically exist, Cuba is the lasgest island in the Caribbean. Around 30 percent is white, no admixture, the rest includes about anything. Even considering the fact that the island has been in a free fall during the last 50 years, it does certainly feel very Spanish in many areas. Most areas in Havana visited by tourists, Centro Habana, Habana Vieja, are almost entirely black because whites there moved to the north, and blacks were brought by communists from the east.

But yes, very Spanish, even in the administrative language, you can notice that Spain was there until 1898 and that the administration staff was mostly Spanish well into the century.
 
Old 07-23-2014, 06:18 PM
 
7,925 posts, read 6,267,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TerryCarr View Post
no more "African" then this dance


or this


and semba is not some middle class thing it's the national music

In traditional African culture women and men arent allowed ton touch each other. So the semba is from Angola's European colonial history. As with the Americas musical and dance traditions embraced both the African and the European.

This is NOT traditional African culture.

In any case you continue to cite music and dance as evidence of something. I know that we western blacks have been so "de Africanized" by our colonial histories, and the only avenues where we were able to retain our African heritage is in music and dance.

But seriously. There is way more to African culture than music and dance, and if you dont understand this, then you are really very westernized to the point that you cant see this.

Every African (outside of the elites) speak at least one African language. Now tell me how many of us in the Americas do this. I dont means Africanized dialects of Euro languages, a few African words which have survived, or people singing songs in rote in some religious ceremony.
 
Old 07-23-2014, 06:22 PM
 
7,925 posts, read 6,267,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TerryCarr View Post
no more "African" then this dance


or this


and semba is not some middle class thing it's the national music

By the way you do know that those Dominican kids arent dancing anything which they consciously regard as African. These are the dance hall movements which are incorporated in reggaeton.

You do know that if some one analyzed what you do culturally, it wouldnt be confined to how you dance or what music like you.

It would encompass more than that, but this is what you reduce African culture to.

So when you see Japanese kids with Jamaican dance hall movements, are they "African" too? It might shock you that some of those Japanese girls are quite competent with those moves.
 
Old 07-24-2014, 12:48 PM
 
7,925 posts, read 6,267,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DginnWonder View Post
Statistics and personal anecdotes are all you need to answer that question. The entire island of Saint Martin is over 85% White/European. . THANKS!

St Maarten/Martin is NOT a majority white island. I guess you stayed on the French side and thought that the restaurant and other workers from France are locals.

Local people account for 15% of the island's population and migrants from other parts of the Caribbean account for about 50%.

So when we add it up we get at least 60% of the population who are either black, mixed or of East Indian ancestry.

St Barths is a white island.
 
Old 07-29-2014, 03:51 AM
 
75 posts, read 86,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
By the way you do know that those Dominican kids arent dancing anything which they consciously regard as African. These are the dance hall movements which are incorporated in reggaeton.

You do know that if some one analyzed what you do culturally, it wouldnt be confined to how you dance or what music like you.

It would encompass more than that, but this is what you reduce African culture to.

So when you see Japanese kids with Jamaican dance hall movements, are they "African" too? It might shock you that some of those Japanese girls are quite competent with those moves.
how many times i have to tell you Angola is "black Brazil".

i never said it was African.
 
Old 07-29-2014, 05:30 AM
 
75 posts, read 86,160 times
Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
In traditional African culture women and men arent allowed ton touch each other. So the semba is from Angola's European colonial history. As with the Americas musical and dance traditions embraced both the African and the European.

This is NOT traditional African culture.

In any case you continue to cite music and dance as evidence of something. I know that we western blacks have been so "de Africanized" by our colonial histories, and the only avenues where we were able to retain our African heritage is in music and dance.

But seriously. There is way more to African culture than music and dance, and if you dont understand this, then you are really very westernized to the point that you cant see this.

Every African (outside of the elites) speak at least one African language. Now tell me how many of us in the Americas do this. I dont means Africanized dialects of Euro languages, a few African words which have survived, or people singing songs in rote in some religious ceremony.
in the muslim nations fine but i don't think so in a lot of places.
of course it isn't nether is Kuduro.

Agora Estraga!!! - Kuduro de Angola - YouTube

not true a lot of African speak european languages are there first language. as i said the Yoruba language live on in Cuba but it's like Latin as in it is used for religious things.
and to a degree religion, food, mannerism, and mentality. you act like Africa some alien place were most people still look like this & people gonna eat you
http://www.artvalue.com/photos/aucti...di-1678620.jpg

as i said before "African" culture is dieing replaced by Europe. you'll find more weirder stuff in the streets of a Asian nation then a African one

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHpPe1nTvq4

Last edited by Ibginnie; 08-01-2014 at 09:02 PM.. Reason: copyright violation
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