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Old 12-02-2012, 11:07 AM
 
14 posts, read 16,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Cuba was far more European before Castro in terms of demographics (it had a large immigrant population from Europe) and a large middle class, right?
Cuba has an immigrant population, either whites or blacks and yes, had a middle class.
Now, everybody is poor.

By the way, there are a lot of racism in Cuba, the blacks dream to get white partners and the whites usually rejects black partners. It is a well-known "secret" with terms like "atrasado" (=dark, mulato) or "adelantado" (="lighter"), which is also found in many countries. Those terms were "imported" from the "moros" during the Spanish-Moros "relations" = conflicts.

 
Old 12-02-2012, 11:12 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cojoncillo View Post
I repeat, you have to be there and know Spain. Habana Vieja looks decisively like a 500 year old Andalusian city. Centro Habana does look like a strange combination of the New World and Andalusian and Castilian cities such as Valladolid or Salamanca. Vedado is definitely modern, with no equivalent in Spain and Miramar and several other plush neighbourhoods have no equivalent in luxury or space in Spain.

As to the presence of whites and your typical American racial obsession, I don't see the relation between "looking like an Andalusian/Spanish city and having blacks and mulattoes selling peanuts in the streets". That's nonsensical.

Please, don't compare such crap islands such as Saint Martin with Havana or Cuba, you are comparing the pearl of the Caribbean with a little crock of an island that only served as a sugar factory. When you say such things. it becomes quite clear that you have never been out of Hialeah.

 
Old 12-02-2012, 12:54 PM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 14 days ago)
 
5,179 posts, read 8,025,013 times
Reputation: 4269
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mecobio View Post
There is no "africanism" in Cuba's buildning, city planning or related.
In reality, there is not much "africanism" in the Spanish Caribbean.

The most obvious African influences are limited to music, religion and genetics, although in all of them the African influence is highly fractured and heavily mixed with European and Taino influences, for the most part. This is true in Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Panama and even in the Caribbean region of Colombia. Even the Spanish dialect spoken in these countries have more Taino words than African ones, even though over 95% of the words are Spanish (hence, they speak Spanish instead of Puerto Rican or Cuban.)

But overall, the few "africanism" found in the Spanish Caribbean tends to be more than is found in African Americans and as such, Americans traveling to the Spanish Caribbean will often notice a stronger African influence, despite that influence being rather small.

To the dismay of many people, when all aspects of culture in the Spanish Caribbean are closely analyzed (language, architecture, food, music, art, etc), the most predominant component is neither the African or Taino influences, but rather the Spanish regardless if the person is white, mixed or black. This has also lead to a stronger sense of national identity, with many people from the Spanish Caribbean feeling uneasy whenever Americans want to break them down based on race or wants to impose a racial identity.

In other parts of the Caribbean, especially in the French and British (or formerly French and British) Caribbean, you will find a much stronger sense of "africaness" than in the Spanish Caribbean.

Also, by Spanish Caribbean, I also include some countries on the mainland such as Venezuela and Panama, plus the Caribbean region of Colombia. Combined with Cuba, Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico; these countries have much more in common among themselves than they do with the rest of the Latin America.

Last edited by AntonioR; 12-02-2012 at 01:10 PM..
 
Old 12-06-2012, 03:22 PM
 
3,501 posts, read 4,957,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cojoncillo View Post
------

Cuba must be the only country in the world in which black/mulatto birthrate is falling.
Not true - the black/mulatto birthrate has been continually falling in the United States, as well as in Brazil (Brasil) where the fertility rate (all races) has dropped and is now only 1.9 children per woman. Read this article

Brazil's Girl Power - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine
 
Old 12-06-2012, 03:42 PM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 14 days ago)
 
5,179 posts, read 8,025,013 times
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Why do people like to combine the black and mulatto statistics? It never made sense to me.

No one would even dream of combining the mulatto and white statistics, despite the fact that mulattoes everywhere (with few and rare exceptions - like in the USA) tend to be culturally closer to whites than to blacks. Also, no one would even consider combining the mestizo and indigenous people statistics.

I'm not saying those two statistics should be combined, but it does begs to be asked.

With that out of the way, how are the black, mulatto and white birthrates in Cuba? Brazil? Everywhere else?

Notice I'm not asking any combination, just each set separately, as it should be.
 
Old 12-10-2012, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Poshawa, Ontario
2,986 posts, read 3,320,081 times
Reputation: 5622
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Havana, Cuba - Most 'european' city in the Carribbean?

If you disagree, why isn't it?
I have only ever been to Dublin, IE as far as European cities go, but I was in Havana last May.

All I can say is unless you are used to visiting filthy European cities with crumbling infrastructure and aggressive beggars harassing you at every turn, Havana is not like any European city. I spent the day there on a tour from Veradero and have zero desire to ever return. The architecture was interesting and the Tropicana show was worth seeing, but the rest of the experience was less than memorable. It is difficult to enjoy the history of the place when you are unable to hear your tour guide tell you about it over all the Cuban beggars shouting Spanish in your face and trying to drag you away from the group. I suspect Havana was also where I picked up whatever pestilence I came home with that made me sicker than I can ever remember being in over 25 years. However, that was my experience. YMMV.
 
Old 12-10-2012, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Poshawa, Ontario
2,986 posts, read 3,320,081 times
Reputation: 5622
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mecobio View Post
Cuba has an immigrant population, either whites or blacks and yes, had a middle class.
Now, everybody is poor.
That's a load of B.S. On the worldwide scale of the world's countries from richest to poorest, Cuba is about dead center. The people may not have a lot in the way of money, but they have a quality of life better than half the planet.
 
Old 12-10-2012, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Sometimes Miami sometimes Australia
1,093 posts, read 2,279,168 times
Reputation: 1057
Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio84 View Post
In reality, there is not much "africanism" in the Spanish Caribbean.

The most obvious African influences are limited to music, religion and genetics, although in all of them the African influence is highly fractured and heavily mixed with European and Taino influences, for the most part. This is true in Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Panama and even in the Caribbean region of Colombia. Even the Spanish dialect spoken in these countries have more Taino words than African ones, even though over 95% of the words are Spanish (hence, they speak Spanish instead of Puerto Rican or Cuban.)

But overall, the few "africanism" found in the Spanish Caribbean tends to be more than is found in African Americans and as such, Americans traveling to the Spanish Caribbean will often notice a stronger African influence, despite that influence being rather small.

To the dismay of many people, when all aspects of culture in the Spanish Caribbean are closely analyzed (language, architecture, food, music, art, etc), the most predominant component is neither the African or Taino influences, but rather the Spanish regardless if the person is white, mixed or black. This has also lead to a stronger sense of national identity, with many people from the Spanish Caribbean feeling uneasy whenever Americans want to break them down based on race or wants to impose a racial identity.

In other parts of the Caribbean, especially in the French and British (or formerly French and British) Caribbean, you will find a much stronger sense of "africaness" than in the Spanish Caribbean.

Also, by Spanish Caribbean, I also include some countries on the mainland such as Venezuela and Panama, plus the Caribbean region of Colombia. Combined with Cuba, Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico; these countries have much more in common among themselves than they do with the rest of the Latin America.
As a former resident of that God-foresaken Island, I can say this is the BEST analysis of race in Cuba
 
Old 12-11-2012, 04:50 PM
 
462 posts, read 582,567 times
Reputation: 396
Before Columbus, it was a lot of tribal villages and some unoccupied islands. I would say most Caribbeans cities are "European" to one degree or another. Of course since the Caribbean was a hotbed for slavery, and had a large native population, "European" ancestry has mixed with others.
 
Old 12-23-2012, 08:12 AM
 
14 posts, read 16,811 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annuvin View Post
That's a load of B.S. On the worldwide scale of the world's countries from richest to poorest, Cuba is about dead center. The people may not have a lot in the way of money, but they have a quality of life better than half the planet.

Cuba had one of the highest standards of living in Latino-America prior Castro, where the Cuban peso had more value than theUS dollar. Communism (=poor standard of living) has made Cuba is a disaster. People didn’t want Batista, but Castro was worst

Now, you can compare Cuba with the rest of the crap of the world, but not before Castro.
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