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Old 06-16-2012, 03:01 PM
 
497 posts, read 874,259 times
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In the United States, you constantly hear of how the US' "War on Drugs" has crippled Mexico dramatically, resulting in a brain drain and an exorbitant amount of funds funneled into regaining control of whole swathes of areas.

In the US, at least, you don't hear much of the other countries and how the drug trade has influenced/affected them. As I understand it, at the recent OAS meeting, they were all in agreement that it has crippled them and has what little money they have to be allocated for the military/police force.

Even Colombia has asked the US to reassess the War.

For many American youths, the War is generally seen as a massive failure, not unlike '20's prohibition.

What are the thoughts of people from Colombia to Mexico?

I'm also including the thoughts of people from the Caribbean, as countries like Jamaica are also hampered by drugs.
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:06 PM
 
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The war on drugs is a failure because you are trying to stop a supply and demand issue. You can try to counter the supply of drugs but if the USA has a demand people will find ways to make money.

Also the USA has very lax gun laws along parts of its borders while many central American countries are trying to crack down on illicit gun sales. This allows cartels to purchase high grade weapons on the border and smuggle them into Mexico and so on. The guns are more expensive in the States but to smuggle them across our border is more easily done than in the borders of other countries.

This country bangs on the drum to stop drugs but until we deal with our drug addiction and be more accountable for our weapons sales no amount of money can stop the drug operations.
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Old 06-16-2012, 08:03 PM
 
497 posts, read 874,259 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stateisota View Post
The war on drugs is a failure because you are trying to stop a supply and demand issue. You can try to counter the supply of drugs but if the USA has a demand people will find ways to make money.

Also the USA has very lax gun laws along parts of its borders while many central American countries are trying to crack down on illicit gun sales. This allows cartels to purchase high grade weapons on the border and smuggle them into Mexico and so on. The guns are more expensive in the States but to smuggle them across our border is more easily done than in the borders of other countries.

This country bangs on the drum to stop drugs but until we deal with our drug addiction and be more accountable for our weapons sales no amount of money can stop the drug operations.
I completely agree, but gun ownership is an integral part of American freedom for many Americans, especially in the Sunbelt. Those laws have an incredible amount of inertia behind them, not the least of which the Bill of Rights. As for the selling of these guns, it oddly ends up being profit for the American govt., which makes some people even less privy to buck the status quo. Terrible, I know...

Drug addictions can't really be helped. Humans always want a high, some more benign (exercising, reading) than others (drugs). Instead, I think the govt should end this war on Drugs and instead funnel those funds into healthcare, for the addicts, for example. Next we should legalize Marijuana, which could actually help the economy as well. More serious drugs, I'm not quite sure how to deal with. Maybe the Portugal/Germany approach, which is much more lax and have actually shown a DECREASE in cocaine users, for example.
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Old 06-19-2012, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
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American guns aren't the problem, it's the archaic failed "war on drugs".

A lot of the American politicians, law enforcement, lawyers, and the judiciary want to see it continue because they'd be unemployed otherwise.

Decriminalize it, then tax it......just like alcohol.
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Old 06-19-2012, 05:55 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
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Legalize Marijuana, mandatory death sentence for anything else upon 3rd conviction for possession. That means if you are convicted 3 times for possession of cocaine, heroin, etc you get executed. You get two chances to turn your life around and get treatment for your addiction or do whatever to stop selling drugs.
Mandatory death sentence for drug smuggling into the US or a US territory. Don't smuggle drugs.

As for the drug cartels. Operation Peace for the Mexican Border - invade northern Mexico, destroy their production sites, their hilltop observation posts from which they spy on the US Border Patrol, kill their leaders, etc.
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Old 06-21-2012, 01:25 PM
 
1,208 posts, read 995,035 times
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Default Death is not the answer

Quote:
Originally Posted by WIHS2006 View Post
Legalize Marijuana, mandatory death sentence for anything else upon 3rd conviction for possession. That means if you are convicted 3 times for possession of cocaine, heroin, etc you get executed. You get two chances to turn your life around and get treatment for your addiction or do whatever to stop selling drugs.
Mandatory death sentence for drug smuggling into the US or a US territory. Don't smuggle drugs.

As for the drug cartels. Operation Peace for the Mexican Border - invade northern Mexico, destroy their production sites, their hilltop observation posts from which they spy on the US Border Patrol, kill their leaders, etc.
Even in places where a death sentence is possible, it hasn't stopped drug use. You need to stop looking at drug abuse as a criminal proplem and start looking at it as more of a medical problem, when it warrents that.

First, all use is not abuse. Many people have used drugs, even addictive drugs like cocaine, and remained functional. Some even stop using on their own.

If making cannabis illegal did not stop it's use, with penalties far harsher than the use of the drug could cause, why would that strategy work any better with the other drugs? It hasn't so far.

The pervasiveness of cannabis is far greater than the use of the other illegal drugs.

All use is not abuse. For those that abuse drugs, they should get medical treatment and support, not incarceration. This will be a small percentage of the overall users.

Today most treatment centers contain some people that don't need treatment, but must take teatment to resume sports or other activities. These facilities have a waiting list that can last months. This is especially true in states with mandated treatment programs.

If drugs were legal it wouldn't be smuggling, it would be importing. Until domestic supply reaches domestic demand, there is no other option than to smuggle/import.

We are not going to invade Mexico. What we will do is something similar to Plan Columbia, which is to flood the country with more money to fight drugs and more military equipment to increase the violence.

If we eliminate Mexico as a source, then the Cartels will move to another location, including inside the US, where they already operate in forests, cities, and towns.
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Old 06-21-2012, 06:34 PM
 
497 posts, read 874,259 times
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It's entirely possible for the government (US) to do to marijuana what it did to gambling: Turn it into a massive government cash cow.

We cannot invade Mexico. There are so, SO many ramifications for this and furthermore, after our recent military escapades, the country is in no mood to militarily fight ANYTHING.

In a completely heartless sense, the War on Drugs is actually a good thing for the US. It keeps a whole bureaucracy employed, makes "technology" (re: Weapons and intelligence) from America more needed and thus pouring in money for said material, it causes a steady supply of cheap Mexican labor into the US, AND it ensures that every country from and including Colombia to Mexico are so preoccupied with the (quite honestly) Civil Wars that they won't be able to challenge American influence. In the US, the War allows for a steady supply of convicts (the VAST majority of those in prison are there on prison related charges) into a prison system that has states by the proverbial balls (The California Prison system is very powerful in Cali, ironically where many drugs are poured into from Mexico, surprise?), whose convicts, due to the stigma, may very well return.

All of this is in jeopardy if the WOD was disbanded. Due to this, I highly doubt the WOD will end. It's just too much of a boon for the government. The only way I can see this happening is if the other involved countries collectively made changes to their own drug laws, got themselves together, and demanded changes. The problem is that will probably never happen (international conflicts/preconceptions between them) and American money is king.


But seriously, can we at least legalize weed? I mean, EVERYONE does it and there has been no conclusive evidence proving it is the gateway drug OR that it is (as) addictive (as other drugs like cocaine or heroin)!
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Old 06-26-2012, 09:12 AM
 
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Beer is the gateway drug, not marijuana.
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Old 06-26-2012, 09:27 AM
 
497 posts, read 874,259 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flip33 View Post
Beer is the gateway drug, not marijuana.
Interesting. Why do you say that?
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Old 06-26-2012, 11:52 AM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 18 days ago)
 
5,205 posts, read 8,035,002 times
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They are supposedly legalizing marijuana down in Uruguay. I think its the first country on this side of the Atlantic to legalize a previously prohibited drug. Lets see how it goes down there.
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