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Old 06-16-2012, 03:03 PM
 
679 posts, read 569,885 times
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I recently read a thread by "God Bless America" and I have come to realize, especially on this forum, that many of my countrymen are obnoxiously arrogant about this country.

Ok lets get this out of the way first, America is a good country to live in. It is rich, there are opportunities and has a decent quality of life.

However there are opportunities in others countries and it confuses me that people here consider America the only place you can get a job. America has tough immigration system and I don't see any advantages here per say Germany when it comes to finding a career.

It all comes down to preference. That's it, nothing else. We are all lucky to be posting on the internet but arguing such silly points only proves you have major short comings about your own beliefs.

I myself am a fan of Germany and its lifestyle. I enjoy the walkable cities with many features to them. Religion is generally not a big deal and people mind their own business. Nightlife is amazing and you can party all night. Not to say we don't have walkable cities but NYC and San Francisco are extremely expensive places to live and don't nearly have the features that cities like Hamburg and Berlin have. That is not to say they are not nice places to live, I just have a preference for German cities and hope to move to one someday.

I don't understand why people such as the OP of the other thread have to argue day and night that their preferences are the CORRECT preferences. Honestly can you all just cork it and have nice discussions on this part of the forum? I don't want to see this turn into the trollfest that is political forum.
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:18 PM
 
497 posts, read 873,803 times
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America has her good and bad points, like any other country. However, if we were to compare the immigration laws/views of immigrants between the US and Germany, the US has Germany, and most of Europe, beat by leaps and bounds.

Also, Germany simply isn't for everyone. Germans have a very well-known reputation for being cold, aloof, distant, and hell-bent on "Ordnung" (one that I actually think is 100% accurate). That turns some people off. A country is more than jobs and opportunities. It is its people and culture, two facts on which the United States has had a (now waning) monopoly. Today Germany has a very good reputation, yet for some, "Ordnung" isn't a code they wish to live by.
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:25 PM
 
775 posts, read 993,544 times
Reputation: 1444
Oh boy....

I think if you read that whole entire thread you will realize that most everyone, Americans included, DON'T agree with Godblessamerica that America is "THE BEST THING EVERRR!!!!!" Yes, Americans are proud, but dude takes it to a whole 'nother level.

Last edited by luckynumber4; 06-16-2012 at 03:33 PM..
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:33 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,234 posts, read 19,531,226 times
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I think that the U.S., the U.K., Canada, France, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, Scandinavian countries, Japan and Australia are pretty much on very similar levels nowadays as far as overall standard of living and quality of life goes for most people. Many more countries are up and coming and will probably join these in the coming decades.

There isn't just one game in town anymore. It's a matter of preference where you choose to live.
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:46 PM
 
497 posts, read 873,803 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
I think that the U.S., the U.K., Canada, France, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, Scandinavian countries, Japan and Australia are pretty much on very similar levels nowadays as far as overall standard of living and quality of life goes for most people. Many more countries are up and coming and will probably join these in the coming decades.

There isn't just one game in town anymore. It's a matter of preference where you choose to live.
Exactly. The US had a monopoly on opportunities, and that monopoly is gone. An Angolan, for example, doesn't only have to work in Boston or Seattle if he wants to be a doctor. He can live comfortably in Vancouver, Perth, or Stockholm. Not saying that he couldn't before, but now the options are more sound and viable. I think in th coming decades it will boil down to culture and people when it comes to global migration. Japan, though still facing a decline, is extremely successful, but most would rather move to Canada, the US, or France, due to Japan's deserved reputation of xenophobia and aversion to foreigners.
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:47 PM
 
15,034 posts, read 13,621,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DginnWonder View Post

Also, Germany simply isn't for everyone. Germans have a very well-known reputation for being cold, aloof, distant, and hell-bent on "Ordnung" (one that I actually think is 100% accurate). That turns some people off. A country is more than jobs and opportunities. It is its people and culture, two facts on which the United States has had a (now waning) monopoly. Today Germany has a very good reputation, yet for some, "Ordnung" isn't a code they wish to live by.
"Ordnung" is a part of German character, German history, German culture. I don't believe that Germany (France, Italy,) were meant to be multi-national countries that the US or Canada/Australia are.
The fact that "ordnung" is part of a German national character, doesn't put them somehow on a lower level in terms of "people and culture" comparably to the US, but rather makes these people and culture more distinct and more traditional, than cultures of the New World, be that the US, Canada or Australia.
These "Old world" European cultures offer things that can't be easily found in the "New World," so it becomes a matter of a trade-off, a matter of your personal preference, and that's why it's understandable why some Europeans want to move to the US, while some Americans would prefer to live in Europe.

Last edited by erasure; 06-16-2012 at 03:57 PM..
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:54 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,708,360 times
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The crabby ignorant posters who complain to you everytime you say something nice about North America is really entertaining for me I like America the way it is, but i feel bad for people who live in this country and constantly point out all the negatives about living here
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Old 06-16-2012, 04:00 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,599 posts, read 70,482,002 times
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OP, do you speak German? You could move there now. My niece did right after graduating from college and found a job. Not a great job, but it has allowed her to stay there for nearly three years. Soon she'll be up for permanent resident status. Ages ago, I got a summer job in Germany, I wasn't even expecting it, but I was offered a job while I was there. I later found out it was illegal for the employer to employ a foreigner. The point is, it happens, it's do-able. Go for it!
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Old 06-16-2012, 04:03 PM
 
15,034 posts, read 13,621,855 times
Reputation: 6916
Quote:
Originally Posted by DginnWonder View Post
Exactly. The US had a monopoly on opportunities, and that monopoly is gone. An Angolan, for example, doesn't only have to work in Boston or Seattle if he wants to be a doctor. He can live comfortably in Vancouver, Perth, or Stockholm. Not saying that he couldn't before, but now the options are more sound and viable. I think in th coming decades it will boil down to culture and people when it comes to global migration. Japan, though still facing a decline, is extremely successful, but most would rather move to Canada, the US, or France, due to Japan's deserved reputation of xenophobia and aversion to foreigners.
Why would Angolan doctor have to work in Stockholm?
Stockholm doesn't have enough of Swedish doctors, or Angolan doctors are so much better?
If Angola is a poor country and this doctor wants to improve his/her quality of life, it's understood if he/she goes to a country of traditional immigration, be that the US or Canada, but what Sweden has got to do with it?
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Old 06-16-2012, 04:04 PM
 
497 posts, read 873,803 times
Reputation: 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
"Ordnung" is a part of German character, German history, German culture. I don't believe that Germany (France, Italy,) were meant to be multi-national countries that the US or Canada/Australia are.
The fact that "ordnung" is part of German national character, doesn't put them somehow on a lower level in terms of "people and culture" comparably to the US, but rather makes these people and culture more distinct and more traditional, than cultures of the New World, be that the US, Canada or Australia.
These "Old world" European cultures offer things that can't be easily found in the "New World," so it becomes a matter of a trade-off, a matter of your personal preference, and that's why it's understandable why some Europeans want to move to the US, while some Americans would prefer to live in Europe.
If you can show me where I said that "ordnung" places German character "on a lower level" than the US, I'd be highly appreciative. I never said it neither good nor bad. Rather, I said that it was something some are attracted to, and others not, being more attracted to the flexibility malleability of American culture, for example.

I cannot speak for Canada and Australia, but most Americans do not view this country as "multi-national", but multi-RACIAL and/or multi-CULTURAL. Big difference there. Whites, Blacks, Asians, etc. all refer to themselves as AMERICAN. Granted, people may refer to themselves as African-American, Asian-American, European-American, but the link between them is -AMERICAN. In fact, the whole point of this thread is how fiercely patriotic Americans are. We are ONE NATION with MANY PEOPLES, not MANY NATIONS within ONE STATE. Big difference there.

Also, the trade-off you speak of goes both ways. There are things in the New World that you will not find in the Old World, such as a dearth of Ordnung (thank God, imo). As I said earlier and also in this thread, some like things "A", and others things "B."
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