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Old 09-30-2012, 12:58 PM
 
Location: West Coast
1,199 posts, read 2,194,079 times
Reputation: 2098

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Repubocrat View Post
My brother who happens to living in Brazil right now has an interesting way of describing the difference between African Americans and African Brazilians, it goes something like this:

African Americans are skeptical, hold grudges against American society and are often angry, they are fully aware of all the injustices that were done to them, but they have organized themselves and have been fighting these injustices for 50 years now. Many have realized that if they work hard and educate themselves, they can be as successful as any other group- they have made a lot of progress in the last 50 years.

Most African Brazilians are "happy people"- they think they have a good life, they live in a favela, but they are still "happy people"-conformed, ignorant, unaware and powerless. Most have no understanding of all the injustices that were done to them and there is little outrage about all the racism and discrimination they endure everyday- it seems like most African Brazilians have accepted their "inferior" position in society and just go on with their lives- happy!- If you look at most Brazilian favelas, you will understand that African Brazilians as a group have made little progress in the last 100 years.
There has never been a civil rights movement in Brazil to change the laws into being inclusive to all of its citizens. Also, I don't think there as been a Brazilian Martin Luther King. There has to be a leader willing to risk their life for the cause of equality. King was willing to lose his life to overthrow the Jim Crow System, and as a result many other people were willing to lose their lives as well. People literally have to be willing to die to change the racial inequities that exists in Brazil.

 
Old 09-30-2012, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Brasilia
196 posts, read 359,909 times
Reputation: 88
Nice, sweet and very interesting to see how Americans likes to debate on Brazilian society composition. So sweet indeed.
 
Old 10-15-2012, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,231,932 times
Reputation: 36087
Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio84 View Post
This isn't a matter of what a person wants to be, but rather what they actually are. Many Americans, especially the Afro-descended ones, have serious issues accepting themselves for what they truly are. They go through great lengths to avoid calling themselves what they are, but to me that's ridiculous since regardless what people call themselves, it doesn't changes a thing about them. A mixed person remains mixed and will always be mixed, they should just accept themselves and move on.
It's neither of the above. It's what other people perceive them to be, and categorize them as.

Is Barack Obama the first black president, or the 44th white one? The only thing that counts is what people think.
 
Old 10-15-2012, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 33,954,615 times
Reputation: 11780
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
I understand what you are saying,and it makes sense.
Let an black american show up at a German beer festival.
They may be treated with scorn,or worse.

In the Usa,they separate the black community. Notice how the American media says"black America's problems,whether its crime,educational attainment,etc.
They should simply say "America's problem". Its as if black America is a nation all to itself within the Usa.
I once walked into a German-American ethnic club on business. I later found out that the club was founded by people who came from the same town as several of my great-great grandparents. When I walked in, though I was regarded as if I were Mumia Abu-Jamal.

Then again, I'm sure that would also happen to an Afro-Brazilian if he did the same thing in Southern Brazil.

So in that sense, there is no difference.
 
Old 10-18-2012, 04:38 AM
 
Location: West Palm Beach, FLORIDA
18 posts, read 33,131 times
Reputation: 31
Sadly, the only difference between American blacks and Brazilian, is Brazilian blacks are dumber.
 
Old 10-18-2012, 09:32 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 8 days ago)
 
47,997 posts, read 45,452,601 times
Reputation: 15313
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucario View Post
I once walked into a German-American ethnic club on business. I later found out that the club was founded by people who came from the same town as several of my great-great grandparents. When I walked in, though I was regarded as if I were Mumia Abu-Jamal.

Then again, I'm sure that would also happen to an Afro-Brazilian if he did the same thing in Southern Brazil.

So in that sense, there is no difference.
Interesting you are mentioning this. I just found this out this morning. There is an African-American dancer/choreographer by the name of Katherine Dunham. She went to visit Brazil in 1950. She and her guests were refused a room, and she felt that race was the issue. This was the Hotel Esplanada, a hotel frequented by American businessmen. She made sure that this event went public. Because of it, racial discrimination in public places was made a felony in 1951.

Kind of shocking when I heard about it.
 
Old 10-18-2012, 09:43 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 8 days ago)
 
47,997 posts, read 45,452,601 times
Reputation: 15313
Brazil has the highest number of Blacks outside of Africa. So in fact, Brazil has more Blacks than the USA. The numbers might vary depending on which racial classification is used. Remember, this is Brazil, no one drop rule. In the USA, anyone with Black ancestry is considered Black(even with one drop). In Brazil, having some African ancestry doesn't automatically mean you're Black.

My mother, for instance, is an African-American women. She also has light skin. She has Creole ancestry, as well as Irish, and Native American, and possibly German. She was actually mistaken for Puerto Rican once, by another Puerto Rican. In America, she is considered Black. In Brazil, she would be considered mulatto, possibly cafuzo(because of her Native American ancestry).

Last edited by green_mariner; 10-18-2012 at 09:55 AM..
 
Old 10-21-2012, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Brasilia
196 posts, read 359,909 times
Reputation: 88
Brazil is a fruit salad. Tasty as one too.
 
Old 10-22-2012, 02:16 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 8 days ago)
 
47,997 posts, read 45,452,601 times
Reputation: 15313
Quote:
Originally Posted by antma robel View Post
Brazil is a fruit salad. Tasty as one too.
What exactly are you trying to say?
 
Old 10-22-2012, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Brasilia
196 posts, read 359,909 times
Reputation: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
What exactly are you trying to say?
Brazil is a melting pot or, an ethnic "fruit salad"...the rest of the sentence is for your own conclusion dude
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