U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 07-08-2012, 02:08 AM
 
Location: 130 Miles E of Sacramento
5,464 posts, read 3,298,653 times
Reputation: 3638

Advertisements

What are some countries in South America developed to American standards? Or remotely close? Or a country an American could live in? You get the idea.

Thanks
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-08-2012, 04:04 AM
 
Location: classified
1,680 posts, read 3,184,709 times
Reputation: 1526
Not sure what your point is here as there are many American expats residing in South America from Colombia, to Venezuela, to Ecuador, to Peru, to Argentina, and even Brazil. It just depends on what your expectations are regarding day to day life stuff, however none of those countries will be culturally similar to the US even if they have a Wal-Mart/McDonalds/Burger King/Starbucks/etc, so you would first have to be willing to make a few adjustments in order to live abroad.

However if your question is regarding which South American country is the most developed in an economic sense, my answer would be Chile, with Uruguay and Argentina not far behind.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2012, 05:12 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,164,246 times
Reputation: 9483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevdawgg View Post
What are some countries in South America developed to American standards? Or remotely close? Or a country an American could live in? You get the idea.

Thanks
What do you mean by 'developed to American standards'?

ALL of South America has highways, internet, corporations, all different sizes of houses, schools, technology, trains, buses, cars, cafes, restaurants, running water, electricity, and whatever else.

But if you're looking for something that is completely identical to California or New York City, but for exactly 1/10th the price tag, with the same wages of the U.S. (as many people seem to look for), than you won't find that.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2012, 09:00 AM
 
2,736 posts, read 3,269,884 times
Reputation: 4098
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevdawgg View Post
What are some countries in South America developed to American standards? Or remotely close? Or a country an American could live in? You get the idea.

Thanks
Your point is understood, yet it is phrased in a somewhat convoluted way. That is. . .An "American" wants to relocate to a South American country which has American standards.

It's probably better stated that, a US Citizen is seeking to relocate to a South American country with US standards of living.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2012, 09:43 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,250 posts, read 19,545,740 times
Reputation: 13008
I'm guessing probably Argentina and Chile, since they have the highest GDPs per capita in South America.

Brazil too since its GDP per capita is higher near the coast from what I remember.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2012, 11:08 AM
 
Location: DF
758 posts, read 1,961,847 times
Reputation: 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by chacho_keva View Post
Your point is understood, yet it is phrased in a somewhat convoluted way. That is. . .An "American" wants to relocate to a South American country which has American standards.

It's probably better stated that, a US Citizen is seeking to relocate to a South American country with US standards of living.

Hey, Chacho! Long time no see!

The question is interesting and speaks a lot of Americans' trips abroad, regardless of how it's phrased. If it's not up to 'American standards', it's not worth visiting or living for long.

No country should ever be held to another country's standards, period. That's ethnocentric and it really won't let you enjoy the country as a whole. Even going to Japan is going to be different: spaces are tighter,transportation will be way more fast paced. Going to England will also be different,...even going to Canada might be a bit of a culture shock.

All this being said, ALL south american countries have the opportunity for you to live a U.S.-style of life with conspicous consumption, a car, and foods high in fat and calories. You'll have to pay for it, however, sometimes at a higher cost than in the U.S. Anywhere from Venezuela down to Peru and Bolivia, you can live an 'American lifestyle', but you'll have to live it behind 8 ft. walls, gates communities and constant vigilance, as well as extremely high car insurance premiums, as well as property insurance premiums.

In Chile, you'll be able to afford that house or apartment, and that car, but petrol prices are twice or 3 times as much as they are in the U.S., and the police are even less corrupt in Chile than in the U.S., so no relationship will help you out of that traffick ticket. Plus the food is just... it's just awful. (Sorry Chileans, god love you, but it's just bland as a salty rock)

In Brazil, you have a couple of whamies that would make it uncomfortable for an American. Petrol prices are ridiculous, there's serious security issues, and it's become a much more expensive place to live in than before. If you want to live like an American in Brazil, 8 ft walls, triple the budget for petrol, triple the budget for insurance, ...

Argentina: it's a tough one. Yeah, prices are cheaper, wine is fantastic, food is pretty good, people are pretty good looking... but everything... everything... is pretty... subpar, if you will. Electricity, water, gas, basic services.... on the surface u would never guess it to be a third world country, but as you spend time there, it becomes crystal clear why they deserve that classification.

Source: Someone who has travelled extensively through all of south america except Paraguay, Guayana, Suriname, and French Guiana.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2012, 12:15 PM
 
1,446 posts, read 4,055,367 times
Reputation: 966
Quote:
Source: Someone who has travelled extensively through all of south america except Paraguay, Guayana, Suriname, and French Guiana.
Let me suggest to you that you say something on the economic development of Uruguay. Uruguay, from what I understand is something between Chile and Argentina in terms of economic development. People have described Uruguay as a smaller version of Argentina, but it is a completely separate country. Usually, you will hear it is better managed than Argentina. Would you agree...I have never been there...so I was hoping you could provide us your perspective on that country.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2012, 12:56 PM
 
14 posts, read 18,380 times
Reputation: 17
I have read in the newspaper, that there is a large American retiree population in Panama. I used to work with a guy who has his retired parents now living there & loving it, good luck.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2012, 02:52 PM
 
Location: DF
758 posts, read 1,961,847 times
Reputation: 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by lentzr View Post
Let me suggest to you that you say something on the economic development of Uruguay. Uruguay, from what I understand is something between Chile and Argentina in terms of economic development. People have described Uruguay as a smaller version of Argentina, but it is a completely separate country. Usually, you will hear it is better managed than Argentina. Would you agree...I have never been there...so I was hoping you could provide us your perspective on that country.
Often times one visits a country with a majority Caucasian population that looks relatively clean (still dirty by American standards), and we assume things are ok and it's a developed country. The reality is that Uruguay has a higher crime rate than the U.S., but lower than Brazil's (that's like being smarter than a kid with down syndome, though), and has some serious economic problems.

It is an expensive country. By that I mean: it's cheap if you're an American making American money or with a large retirement account, but not if you're planning on living and working there as an English teacher or other trade. As far as being managed better than Argentina, it's slightly more efficient in terms of public transportation, and infrastructure in general, but like I said, once you're there long enough, it becomes crystal clear what kind of country you're in.

Uruguay does have the highest HDI in Latin America (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...an_development) this just means you have a very educated, realtively healthy population with very little purchasing power.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2012, 03:56 PM
 
1,446 posts, read 4,055,367 times
Reputation: 966
I know that Uruguay has had its problems. There was a military dictatorship during the 1970s and early 1980s. The economic has also declined. I also do admit that it by most means NOT a developed country. Even Chile has yet to achieve this status. However, what I was asking is to compare with other countries in South America and not to the United States. I do not want to compare apples and oranges.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top