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Old 10-11-2012, 10:42 PM
 
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I'm thinking of areas like Esmeraldas in Ecuador, Chincha in Peru, Northeastern Brazil, Costa Chica in Mexico, Loiza in Puerto Rico and Choco in Colombia, among others. All are known for their higher concentrations and long history of people of African descent, but I'm wondering if there are similarities. I could have added areas/communities like the Caribbean coastal areas of Central American countries, many small communities in Nova Scotia and SW Ontario in Canada(especially Preston in Nova Scotia) and even the River Plate area of Argentina and Uruguay.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 10-11-2012 at 11:05 PM..
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Old 10-11-2012, 10:52 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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The Mississippi Delta is in the South. Can't get more southern than that.
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Old 10-12-2012, 07:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
The Mississippi Delta is in the South. Can't get more southern than that.
I was thinking more in terms of whether these areas are more like subregions or are regions of the countries themselves.
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Old 10-13-2012, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
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I'm really not sure what you're asking. I'd say that places like Loiza, Esmeraldas, Choco, Darien in Panama, the Afro-Mexican and the Afro-Peruvian areas and places like Limon in Costa Rica and Atlantic Nicaragua and Honduras are subregions, sort of outside the mainstream culture of the country. On the other hand, Salvador, Brazil, Cartagena, Colombia, and even Loiza are sort of integral places in their respective national cultures, places, like the Delta and New Orleans, that are considered to be African Diasporal folk and pop cultural, as well as historical, hubs.
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Old 10-14-2012, 12:10 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Lucario View Post
I'm really not sure what you're asking. I'd say that places like Loiza, Esmeraldas, Choco, Darien in Panama, the Afro-Mexican and the Afro-Peruvian areas and places like Limon in Costa Rica and Atlantic Nicaragua and Honduras are subregions, sort of outside the mainstream culture of the country. On the other hand, Salvador, Brazil, Cartagena, Colombia, and even Loiza are sort of integral places in their respective national cultures, places, like the Delta and New Orleans, that are considered to be African Diasporal folk and pop cultural, as well as historical, hubs.
That is basically what I'm trying to understand, as I'm wondering as to how these places are viewed within their respective countries or even if others recognize their significance in relation to their countries/regions, etc. I even wonder if people realize that these places exist.
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Old 10-14-2012, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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Although the entire United States is an example of living history, in my opinion there are only a half-dozen truly historical areas: New England, Manhattan and Long Island; Boston and Philadelphia; New Orleans and the Mississippi Delta; California; South Carolina and southern Florida. The balance of the American history is a snapshot in time of exploration and expansion into uncharted territories.

Each state has it own historical story to tell whether it is the story of Henry Hudson, the first slave in America, the wars that changed the course of America history, and the laws and politics that brought calm or caused untended consequence. Here is an example regarding the Delta that is promoted for its gambling and battlefields rather than for its ancient history - and what some are doing to change it.

"Along with swamps, bayous and rivers, the historic floodplain of the Mississippi River contained 24 million acres of hardwood forests. The remaining 4.4. million forested acres—often in small fragments—provide vital habitat for black bears, songbirds, alligator snapping turtles and abundant game species. Throughout Mississippi and the Delta, these smaller forested sections are challenging for animal species that require large, undisturbed forests to survive."

Mississippi Alluvial Plain | The Nature Conservancy
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Old 01-23-2013, 05:34 PM
 
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how in the heck can virginia or the chesapeake bay area not be considered a historical area.
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Old 01-24-2013, 07:20 AM
 
Location: classified
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Originally Posted by mikemike84 View Post
how in the heck can virginia or the chesapeake bay area not be considered a historical area.
Especially considering that that region was where the first colonists have settled (Jamestown, VA), where the national anthem was written (Baltimore), where the US has gained it's independence from Britain (Williamsburg and Yorktown), where the national capitol was founded (DC), the numerous civil war battlefields around, etc. Evidently some people here don't know their history.
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Old 01-25-2013, 05:03 PM
 
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I think these links could be of some help: San Basilio de Palenque: African Tradition in Colombia

San Basilio de Palenque - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Africa's Legacy

Yanga, Veracruz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 01-25-2013, 05:09 PM
 
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In addition, there are some islands off of the Caribbean coast of Colombia, that are part of Colombia. The population used to be mainly persons of African descent. Archipelago of San Andrés, Providencia and Santa Catalina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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