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Old 12-23-2012, 01:08 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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I've heard, for instance, that in Mexico few women (local women that is) wear bikinis too the beach because it is still very conservative. Is that true? I actually imagine Latin Americans to be very open with their bodies, like in Brazil, but are a lot places pretty prudish? Maybe the more Catholic countries? How conservative/liberal would Brazil be on the whole?

It seems in some ways Latin American is more liberal than I thought. On things like gay rights, for instance, Argentina has gay marriage. How would you say Latin America compares to the US or Europe, and how much do attitudes differ by country? Are most people in Buenos Aires as liberal as say, those in Madrid or Milan? Are people in rural Paraguay as conservative as people in the rural Deep South?
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Old 12-23-2012, 03:46 AM
 
Location: Iowa, Heartland of Murica
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It varies depending on the country and region but I would say that most Latin countries are similar. Most Latin women are more open with their bodies than Americans but to get to them, it takes a lot of courting and lots of time spent.

You may see a girl at a beach in Rio wearing a very revealing bikini but it does not mean, they are easy, the whole courting process is long and ridiculous. I have seen guys at bars in Brazil spend 3 hours courting a woman and they still got nothing.

In more "civilized" cultures-like Northern Europe and here in the USA, women are much more liberated, they will either take the initiative or show clearly that they are interested- Latin women may flirt and show interest but it takes time to get to the goods

Not to mention all the games and the drama, usually the girl will say NO or play hard to get just to see your reaction, it is just too much time and effort wasted. I think the Catholic religion has a lot to do with it.

Maybe because I am more used to the American way-dealing with American/European women is a lot easier and less dramatic.
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Old 12-23-2012, 05:28 AM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 11 days ago)
 
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Latin America is much more conservative than the US and it shows in ways that have to be seen to be believed.

For example, in many countries they even have dress codes in government buildings. I have witnessed men in shorts being told by the security guards to leave and return with long pants before paying their property taxes. Imagine that.

In the US, a person can go into a government building in a short-sleeve shirt, short pants and sandals, and no one would say anything, especially if said person is there to pay some taxes. lol
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Old 12-23-2012, 07:28 AM
 
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It's a paradox. On the one hand our culture does not make seeing a half naked body taboo like in the Protestant countries (it's also seen as sexist and degrading to women), but Repubocrat is right. Latina women are not as easily datable as non-Latin women, and it's a more formal process. It's also a big deal for a woman to have to introduce her man to her family, especially her father. Gotta remember too that most of these countries are in the tropics, so wearing more revealing attire is not trying to be sexy, but just comfortable.
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Old 12-24-2012, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Boston
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It's more conservative. When dressing, I'm from Texas so when I'm hot, I wear shorts. In Santo Domingo in the middle of July, humidity and heat abound, the people who wore shirts were:
1. Tourists
2. Ladies of the Night

The women would wear tank tops and loose blouses, but shorts seemed to be an unspoken no-no. Even skirts came at least to the knee, and I'm talking women my age (20s). Probably a tie-over from the island's strong Roman Catholic faith. So, I wore jeans and blouse-y tanks to fit in. You also learn to not go out until the sun sets so that you don't overheat.
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Old 12-24-2012, 04:27 PM
 
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For what I know prostitution is legal in most of those countries so I wouldn't say too prudish.
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Old 12-25-2012, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio84 View Post
Latin America is much more conservative than the US and it shows in ways that have to be seen to be believed.

For example, in many countries they even have dress codes in government buildings. I have witnessed men in shorts being told by the security guards to leave and return with long pants before paying their property taxes. Imagine that.

In the US, a person can go into a government building in a short-sleeve shirt, short pants and sandals, and no one would say anything, especially if said person is there to pay some taxes. lol
That's too broad a generalization. I've never seen a security guard do that here. And I've certainly seen people wearing shorts to banks and government buildings to pay taxes or whatever.

What you say may have been true here in the past, a very long time ago (decades).
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Old 12-25-2012, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
830 posts, read 2,073,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverbelles View Post
It's more conservative. When dressing, I'm from Texas so when I'm hot, I wear shorts. In Santo Domingo in the middle of July, humidity and heat abound, the people who wore shirts were:
1. Tourists
2. Ladies of the Night

The women would wear tank tops and loose blouses, but shorts seemed to be an unspoken no-no. Even skirts came at least to the knee, and I'm talking women my age (20s). Probably a tie-over from the island's strong Roman Catholic faith. So, I wore jeans and blouse-y tanks to fit in. You also learn to not go out until the sun sets so that you don't overheat.
Not all parts of Latin America are tropical. Some are even cold the whole year.
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Old 12-25-2012, 10:36 AM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 11 days ago)
 
5,167 posts, read 8,017,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanfel View Post
That's too broad a generalization. I've never seen a security guard do that here. And I've certainly seen people wearing shorts to banks and government buildings to pay taxes or whatever.

What you say may have been true here in the past, a very long time ago (decades).
I never generalized, hence the words in many countries. Besides, the example I gave I did witnessed and they even have the dress code on the wall in many of the buildings, clearly listing everything that is not acceptable attire. I put great emphasis on the fact that I saw this in government buildings, because usually dress codes are not strict in those types of building, unlike in religious buildings or in private buildings or stores or restaurants.
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Old 12-25-2012, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
830 posts, read 2,073,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio84 View Post
I never generalized, hence the words in many countries. Besides, the example I gave I did witnessed and they even have the dress code on the wall in many of the buildings, clearly listing everything that is not acceptable attire. I put great emphasis on the fact that I saw this in government buildings, because usually dress codes are not strict in those types of building, unlike in religious buildings or in private buildings or stores or restaurants.
I read quickly and I didn't realized about "in many countries" at first. Sorry for the undeserved remark.
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