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Old 01-02-2013, 10:24 AM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 12 days ago)
 
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A few excerpts from the article in The Economist:

Quote:
...One of the deepest scars in Latin America’s history: the War of the Triple Alliance, a conflict between Paraguay and a coalition of Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay that began in 1865 (just as the American civil war was drawing to a close), and ended in 1870.
Quote:
The war, known in Paraguay as the “War of ’70” or the “Great War”, was among the worst military defeats ever inflicted on a modern nation state. According to Thomas Whigham of the University of Georgia, as much as 60% of the population and 90% of Paraguayan men died from combat or, more often, from disease and starvation.
Unbelievable!

Last edited by Ibginnie; 04-23-2015 at 08:29 PM.. Reason: Copyright violation
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Old 01-02-2013, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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The part that the British magazine "The Economist" failed to mention is that, at that time, Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay were puppets of the British Empire, and the British Empire HATED Solano Lopez, and was behind the push for this war.

It was a "proxy war" of the British Empire against Solano Lopez.

But yes, as a Brazilian, I think it's a big national shame what our troops did in Paraguay. Our troops even used primitive "biological warfare".

A real shame, and I think all the streets and squares in Brazil with names of "heroes" from the Paraguay War should be renamed. Those generals and admirals were not heroes, they were war criminals.
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Old 01-02-2013, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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By the way, it's amazing to see the timing of this article by "The Economist".

Just when The Economist finished its "honeymoon" with the Brazilian government, and tried to push for Finance Minister Guido Mantega to be fired, and was promptly rebutted by President Dilma Rousseff, because foreign magazines no longer "make" or "unmake" ministers in Brazil...

Now, The Economist comes with this piece of propaganda against "evil imperialistic Brazil", digging up this war from more than 140 years ago...

They can be sooooooo vile when they see they are not being "obeyed" anymore...
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Old 01-03-2013, 10:23 AM
 
497 posts, read 873,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
By the way, it's amazing to see the timing of this article by "The Economist".

Just when The Economist finished its "honeymoon" with the Brazilian government, and tried to push for Finance Minister Guido Mantega to be fired, and was promptly rebutted by President Dilma Rousseff, because foreign magazines no longer "make" or "unmake" ministers in Brazil...

Now, The Economist comes with this piece of propaganda against "evil imperialistic Brazil", digging up this war from more than 140 years ago...

They can be sooooooo vile when they see they are not being "obeyed" anymore...
LOL Thanks Malaman! Didn't even notice that! So passive-aggressive...

I think the majority of Brazilians don't know/care about the war, at the very least its ramifications. The war is THE reason Paraguay is this tiny, insignificant country as opposed to the rising Latin American power that it was. I would argue that Paraguay would probably be somewhat similar to Argentina today, had it not been for the war. It had so many things going for it...
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Old 01-03-2013, 10:46 AM
 
Location: In the heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DginnWonder View Post
LOL Thanks Malaman! Didn't even notice that! So passive-aggressive...

I think the majority of Brazilians don't know/care about the war, at the very least its ramifications. The war is THE reason Paraguay is this tiny, insignificant country as opposed to the rising Latin American power that it was. I would argue that Paraguay would probably be somewhat similar to Argentina today, had it not been for the war. It had so many things going for it...
Well, maybe the four and a half decades of authoritarian rule by Stroessner up until 1989 might have contributed a bit.
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Old 01-03-2013, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Well, maybe the four and a half decades of authoritarian rule by Stroessner up until 1989 might have contributed a bit.

It obviously did...



Of course the war was very bad for the development of Paraguay, but it happened 140 years ago, and after the war, Paraguay was not under occupation of foreign troops.

If we were living in the year 1920 I would agree that Brazil was still responsible for the current situation in Paraguay, and would have to pay reparations.

But we are not in 1920, we are in 2013, and from 1920 to 2013 it was a long period of time when Brazil had little to no responsibility about anything that happened in Paraguay.
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Old 01-04-2013, 06:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DginnWonder View Post
LOL Thanks Malaman! Didn't even notice that! So passive-aggressive...

I think the majority of Brazilians don't know/care about the war, at the very least its ramifications. The war is THE reason Paraguay is this tiny, insignificant country as opposed to the rising Latin American power that it was. I would argue that Paraguay would probably be somewhat similar to Argentina today, had it not been for the war. It had so many things going for it...
I may have it wrong, but wasn't one of the results of the war the forced mixing of the European population with the native Guaranis, resulting in the modern almost entirely Mestizo population?
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Old 01-06-2013, 05:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vantexan View Post
I may have it wrong, but wasn't one of the results of the war the forced mixing of the European population with the native Guaranis, resulting in the modern almost entirely Mestizo population?
Got that wrong. Paraguay's first Consul, who ruled from 1811 to 1840, who had a very long name I can't remember, ordered that the Spanish couldn't marry each other, but could only marry blacks, mulattoes, and Indians. His goal was to prevent any one group feeling superior to others and to prevent any challenge to his rule. Also did a little reading about the war. Paraguay's leader at the time was developing a powerful military, was paranoid, and felt Brazil was meddling in Uruguay's affairs, which upset him as he was trying to align himself with Uruguay's Blanco Party. When Brazil sent troops into Uruguay over a dispute he declared war on Brazil. Argentina stayed neutral until Paraguay attacked the Corrientes Department. Paraguay actually had more troops than the other three combined at the time but turns out they were poorly trained and equipped. The tipping point was Brazil's navy. Paraguay paid a terrible price, it's considered the most devastating defeat of a nation in modern times. And although Great Britain has been accused of being involved there's no real evidence of that. Just a tin horn dictator who drove his country into the ground and the war didn't end until he got captured and killed.
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Old 01-07-2013, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
2,564 posts, read 4,650,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vantexan View Post
Got that wrong. Paraguay's first Consul, who ruled from 1811 to 1840, who had a very long name I can't remember, ordered that the Spanish couldn't marry each other, but could only marry blacks, mulattoes, and Indians. His goal was to prevent any one group feeling superior to others and to prevent any challenge to his rule. Also did a little reading about the war. Paraguay's leader at the time was developing a powerful military, was paranoid, and felt Brazil was meddling in Uruguay's affairs, which upset him as he was trying to align himself with Uruguay's Blanco Party. When Brazil sent troops into Uruguay over a dispute he declared war on Brazil. Argentina stayed neutral until Paraguay attacked the Corrientes Department. Paraguay actually had more troops than the other three combined at the time but turns out they were poorly trained and equipped. The tipping point was Brazil's navy. Paraguay paid a terrible price, it's considered the most devastating defeat of a nation in modern times. And although Great Britain has been accused of being involved there's no real evidence of that. Just a tin horn dictator who drove his country into the ground and the war didn't end until he got captured and killed.

Great Britain was behind EVERYTHING related to this war.

Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina were three puppets of the British Empire at that time. Paraguay was the only country in South America that had an independent position regarding the British Empire, and didn't let any British ambassador to mess with the internal affairs of the country (like in the other countries of the region).

That's why Paraguay needed to "pay the price".

A shame what Brazilian military did to Paraguay, to satisfy the British Empire...
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Old 01-07-2013, 08:09 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,116 posts, read 23,634,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalaMan View Post
Great Britain was behind EVERYTHING related to this war.

Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina were three puppets of the British Empire at that time. Paraguay was the only country in South America that had an independent position regarding the British Empire, and didn't let any British ambassador to mess with the internal affairs of the country (like in the other countries of the region).

That's why Paraguay needed to "pay the price".

A shame what Brazilian military did to Paraguay, to satisfy the British Empire...
Really? The British Empire certainly had large commercial interests in the area and was influential as the largest empire at the time, but I don't see what evidence there is of making all three countries its puppet. There has been substantial academic discussion and research on the matter and for all intents and purposes, the saber rattling at the British Empire where it's put to blame for EVERYTHING was a product of the 1960s and on propaganda arms of Paraguayan and Argentinean strongmen since having some boogeyman to blame is wonderful for misdirecting people's attention and focusing people away from the ills caused by poor government. The people that "pay the price" for this kind of boogeyman misdirection are the citizens of the governments propagating this.
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