U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-20-2013, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Chicago
178 posts, read 305,542 times
Reputation: 185

Advertisements

Hello,
I am planning a trip to BA during July. I had a few quick questions

1. looking for a reasonably priced hotel in a young and artsy area.....please suggest some neighborhoods.

2. Planning to go to Montevideo for a few days. What is the cheapest way to get there.......renting a car would be the last opportunity.

3. I can speak some Spanish, but how common is English?

4. Is the subway the best way to get around?

Thanks in advance.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-20-2013, 09:19 PM
 
9,334 posts, read 19,500,620 times
Reputation: 4445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bird4Prez View Post
Hello,
I am planning a trip to BA during July. I had a few quick questions

1. looking for a reasonably priced hotel in a young and artsy area.....please suggest some neighborhoods.

2. Planning to go to Montevideo for a few days. What is the cheapest way to get there.......renting a car would be the last opportunity.

3. I can speak some Spanish, but how common is English?

4. Is the subway the best way to get around?

Thanks in advance.
1. Define reasonable. I'd stay in Palermo Norte and go to lonely planet travel forum.
2. Take the ferry from BA. Google buquebus.
3. Fairly common in tourist industries (hotels, restos, etc).
4. Yes
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2013, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
5,899 posts, read 8,455,411 times
Reputation: 4367
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bird4Prez View Post
Hello,
I am planning a trip to BA during July. I had a few quick questions

1. looking for a reasonably priced hotel in a young and artsy area.....please suggest some neighborhoods.

2. Planning to go to Montevideo for a few days. What is the cheapest way to get there.......renting a car would be the last opportunity.

3. I can speak some Spanish, but how common is English?

4. Is the subway the best way to get around?

Thanks in advance.
Good choice to come here in July! It usually haves the best weather, imo. Of course thats to me, that i love the cold weather (or as "cold" as it can get here), but keep in mind that July is the coldest month in Buenos Aires and its winter here. Bring some warm clothes. Its not freezing cold (the average is something like 7/14c) but you can have some cold nights (close to 0) and cold days. Other than that, the days are usaully beautiful and sunny.

about neighbourhoods: the sure thing is Palermo, it is a young and artsy area and full of hotels all over. Also, cafes, bar, bookstores, squares. A really nice and hip area. Another area close to Palermo, very nice but not as expensive is Colegiales. Its become more hip in the last years, but new cafes and bars that opened, but its a more quiet neighbourhood, more green and tranquil.
Then you have Recoleta, the more upscale neighbourhood, not as young as Palermo.
And San Telmo, the bohemian nb of the city, definetely cheaper than Palermo, but farther away and some people would say its dark or shady looking at night. I disagree. I lived there and its ok at night. And its a very pretty bohemian nb, and sure will be cheaper than Palermo.

Theres also Belgrano, but its more a familiar type of nb, and also kind of expensive. Almargo north is a nice nb too, but it doesnt have the hip or the artsy young hip that Palermo haves. The problem with Palermo is that is expensive, maybe you should look in the Palermo southeast area, next to the Cordoba street, like in the limits with Barrio Norte. Maybe its cheaper there.


2- Best option is to take the ferry in Buenos Aires, and its very quick. I dont know the prices, but i know there is a cheap ferry and a more expensive one, you should take the cheap one.

3- You wont have problems talking in english with the hotel people and in some places the clercks will know english. Knowing spanish is better, though, but ill say a lot of people here have the basic notions of english.

4- Yes, the subway is very fast and easy, BUT it can get really crowded and its DEFINETELY too hot down there. But you will come here in winter, so it wont be as bad as now (now subway is terrible), but it also haves the downside that you go down with all the clothes from the outside witner and get down to those 30c subway, so the difference kinda sucks. I personally like buses more. Theres a guide you can purchase anywhere, its called "guía T", it indicates you how the buses work and its really easy too understand. There are MILLONS of buses that will take you anywhere in BA, so if you feel like studying them, i would personally go with the bus. Its not as hot and crowded as the subway, and its cheaper. Sure, its slower, but you also get to see the city as opposed as in the subway.
But maybe subways are much easier to learn from a tourist perspective. I know when i was in Paris i was able to learn the Metro but didnt even dreamed to understand those buses.


Anyting more you need you can PM me and i ll answer
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-22-2013, 06:19 PM
 
Location: DF
758 posts, read 1,966,151 times
Reputation: 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
Good choice to come here in July! It usually haves the best weather, imo. Of course thats to me, that i love the cold weather (or as "cold" as it can get here), but keep in mind that July is the coldest month in Buenos Aires and its winter here. Bring some warm clothes. Its not freezing cold (the average is something like 7/14c) but you can have some cold nights (close to 0) and cold days. Other than that, the days are usaully beautiful and sunny.

about neighbourhoods: the sure thing is Palermo, it is a young and artsy area and full of hotels all over. Also, cafes, bar, bookstores, squares. A really nice and hip area. Another area close to Palermo, very nice but not as expensive is Colegiales. Its become more hip in the last years, but new cafes and bars that opened, but its a more quiet neighbourhood, more green and tranquil.
Then you have Recoleta, the more upscale neighbourhood, not as young as Palermo.
And San Telmo, the bohemian nb of the city, definetely cheaper than Palermo, but farther away and some people would say its dark or shady looking at night. I disagree. I lived there and its ok at night. And its a very pretty bohemian nb, and sure will be cheaper than Palermo.
I like Recoleta Better, but Fair Enough.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
2- Best option is to take the ferry in Buenos Aires, and its very quick. I dont know the prices, but i know there is a cheap ferry and a more expensive one, you should take the cheap one.
The cheap one is not so quick... 6 hours v 3 hours, and you save yourself maybe 50 bucks if you do the cheap one. The cheap ones usually also stop in colonia and package it in with a bus transfer to Montevideo.... unless you want to do a day-trip in colonia (which is actually a pretty neat place in and of itself), I would suggest upgrading, enjoying your vacation and paying the extra 50 bucks for the 3 hour buquebus to Montevideo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
3- You wont have problems talking in english with the hotel people and in some places the clercks will know english. Knowing spanish is better, though, but ill say a lot of people here have the basic notions of english.
Speaking spanish will get you a lot farther, even just a little bit. Whatever Spanish you speak, it is probably at the same level of most people's English. Even within the tourist industry: the bellhops, security guards, taxi drivers and many ticket vendors and souvenir shops barely speak any English at all... and the Chinese owned supermarkets, which are the cheapest way to stock up on provisions if you're on a budget... they only speak Chinese and Spanish. This all being said... should you be in trouble, the nearest young educated person that speaks English is not too far away and they're always happy to help.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
4- Yes, the subway is very fast and easy, BUT it can get really crowded and its DEFINETELY too hot down there. But you will come here in winter, so it wont be as bad as now (now subway is terrible), but it also haves the downside that you go down with all the clothes from the outside witner and get down to those 30c subway, so the difference kinda sucks. I personally like buses more. Theres a guide you can purchase anywhere, its called "guía T", it indicates you how the buses work and its really easy too understand. There are MILLONS of buses that will take you anywhere in BA, so if you feel like studying them, i would personally go with the bus. Its not as hot and crowded as the subway, and its cheaper. Sure, its slower, but you also get to see the city as opposed as in the subway.
But maybe subways are much easier to learn from a tourist perspective. I know when i was in Paris i was able to learn the Metro but didnt even dreamed to understand those buses.
One thing that happened when I was there (don't know if this is still the case)... COINS! OMG you could not get coins ANYWHERE in BA. Riding the subway/bus was a pain in the butt because no one would give you change... even big department stores round up or down, or give you candy as change... but unfortunately, the buses and subways do not take candy. ... an update on this from someone that's living there would be nice. I don't live there and haven't been in a while.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-22-2013, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
5,899 posts, read 8,455,411 times
Reputation: 4367
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelaldo View Post
I

One thing that happened when I was there (don't know if this is still the case)... COINS! OMG you could not get coins ANYWHERE in BA. Riding the subway/bus was a pain in the butt because no one would give you change... even big department stores round up or down, or give you candy as change... but unfortunately, the buses and subways do not take candy. ... an update on this from someone that's living there would be nice. I don't live there and haven't been in a while.
Now we have the SUBE!!! It is a card that you can use in subway/buses and even middle-distance buses (like going to cities like La Plata or places 100 km away) and you can charge them in most kioskos, all around the city. So you charge, i dont know, 40 pesos to the sube and you are good to go in every transport. It is great and now the coins are not an issue anymore
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2013, 06:14 PM
 
306 posts, read 441,360 times
Reputation: 455
And if you enjoy eating steak/red meats Buenos Aires is heaven..they way they cook it..wow!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2013, 08:22 PM
 
Location: DF
758 posts, read 1,966,151 times
Reputation: 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
Now we have the SUBE!!! It is a card that you can use in subway/buses and even middle-distance buses (like going to cities like La Plata or places 100 km away) and you can charge them in most kioskos, all around the city. So you charge, i dont know, 40 pesos to the sube and you are good to go in every transport. It is great and now the coins are not an issue anymore
Awesome! That was a nightmare. Sometimes I would just give up and take taxis or walk.... and a lot of other Portenos did.

You're right, for someone that doesn't know how to navigate the systems and doesn't have a great handle on Spanish, the initial traveler is better off sticking to the subways. Too bad google map street views isn't in Argentina yet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2013, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Midwest
4,635 posts, read 3,992,070 times
Reputation: 6631
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bird4Prez View Post
Hello,
I am planning a trip to BA during July. I had a few quick questions

1. looking for a reasonably priced hotel in a young and artsy area.....please suggest some neighborhoods.

2. Planning to go to Montevideo for a few days. What is the cheapest way to get there.......renting a car would be the last opportunity.

3. I can speak some Spanish, but how common is English?

4. Is the subway the best way to get around?

Thanks in advance.
I just got back from Argentina two weeks ago, although I only spent 3 days in BA...I spent most of my time in Bariloche...it is in the foothills of the Andes and very beautiful, if you don't mind cold and snow at the time you'll be there, it is a must see place.

1. Palermo

2. Take the ferry

3. Only in the hotels. There was basic English at the cambio.

4. I didn't leave Microcenter due to my short visit and walked everywhere I went. I would take a cab. Make sure it is legit. I have read a lot of stories about pick pockets in the subway (like every other city).

Other things that shouldn't be overlooked...my general observations...
Look for flights on a Tuesday, Wednesday, or Saturday...it is when fares are the cheapest.

I'd fly into and out of Uruguay instead of EZE to save money. There is an airport tax in Uruguay, but I doubt it is like the $160 USD you have to pay if you fly into AEP or EZE. You could also flight into Mendoza via Santiago, chill in Mendoza, and then fly from Mendoza to BA.

If you fly into EZE (or AEP if you head to Mendoza) and are looking for an English speaking pick up from/to the airport and have some money to spend, take Silver Star Car Service. Fred (the owner, an American ex-pat) is cool and my driver, Sergio (lived in Canada for 8 years), was also cool. If you are a solo traveller and don't speak Spanish it is nice to have an actual conversation with somebody, so that alone made the extra fee worth it.

Their Spanish is weird in the sense it isn't like the Spanish from Mexico or Central America that you learned in school. For one, they speak slower (or it seemed that way), but that won't make it easier to understand. Their Spanish has some Italian infused into it. Every morning I was ready to say Buenas Dias and they'd (random hotel staff and other people) drop a Buen Dia on me...they also like vos instead of tu. LL isn't a y sound but a j sound. There are many more differences. I recommend finding a TV stream from Argentina to get used to it before you go and or read up on Rioplatense Spanish before you go.

Shop around at legitimate businesses (not random dudes yelling cambio on Calle Florida or any other street...they trade fake cash) for the best exchange rate. I got a sweet rate at the Hertz in EZE. It was like 6 pesos to the 1 dollar when the official rate was at 4.9 per 1. Make sure the bills are legit. Read up on it and make sure you get a good amount of small bills because breaking a $100 peso in BA was a pain. Also, make sure your CC company and bank know you are going to Argentina so they don't freeze your accounts when you use your CC or withdraw money.

My general rule for all travel...don't look too much like a tourist. The city is built on a grid, so it is almost impossible to get lost. Every restaurant I went to, you just go and sit down. I looked like an idiot the first time I went to a restaurant because I was just standing there..LOL.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2013, 08:32 PM
 
Location: classified
1,680 posts, read 3,194,150 times
Reputation: 1534
Quote:
Originally Posted by dude1984 View Post
I'd fly into and out of Uruguay instead of EZE to save money. There is an airport tax in Uruguay, but I doubt it is like the $160 USD you have to pay if you fly into AEP or EZE. You could also flight into Mendoza via Santiago, chill in Mendoza, and then fly from Mendoza to BA.

If you fly into EZE (or AEP if you head to Mendoza) and are looking for an English speaking pick up from/to the airport and have some money to spend, take Silver Star Car Service. Fred (the owner, an American ex-pat) is cool and my driver, Sergio (lived in Canada for 8 years), was also cool. If you are a solo traveller and don't speak Spanish it is nice to have an actual conversation with somebody, so that alone made the extra fee worth it.
Actually the Argentine government has changed it to include the other points of entry as well so you might as well just fly into Buenos Aires and pay the fee to save yourself the hassle. Also you are required to pre-pay this fee in advance online.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top