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Old 07-11-2013, 07:29 PM
 
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Cuba has a long history of having educated people. Following the independence from Spain, intellectuals described the Cuban population as some of the most educated peoples in the Americas. The educated identity of Cubans predate the revolution. It's part of the Cuban tradition to put education first.


According to UNESCO, 99.8% of Cubans are literate. This percentage tops the rest of Latin America.

I also found this interesting.

Quote:
25% of Cuban Americans have a college education, about twice the average of all other Hispanic groups, and lower than that of non-Hispanic whites, of which 30% are college graduates.[3]
39% of US-born Cuban Americans have a college degree or higher, as compared to only 30% of non-Hispanic whites.[3]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_Cuba
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Old 07-11-2013, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Florida
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I believe the US census indicates they are/were at one time the wealthiest hispanic/latin/latino group in the USA
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Old 07-11-2013, 10:08 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 4 days ago)
 
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The Cuban colony in the US is different from other Latino groups. No other Latin American country witnessed practically its entire upper and upper middle classes move to the US in a period of one decade.

Most other Latino groups in the US are made up, for the most part, by lower and working class people, many of whom are originally country folks.

Its a similar reason for why the Cuban colony is also among the whitest.
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Old 07-12-2013, 04:38 AM
 
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I visit Cuba very frequently, and even non-white Cubans are in no way comparable with their neighbours. Even the poorest are educated, well versed in about anything.

I have seen groups of Puerto Ricans, South Americans, American Blacks or Venezuelans invited to Cuba for propaganda reasons (ELAM, escuela universitaria de ciencias médicas) in Baracoa, near Havana and they do stand out as strange, different people, lacking the manners of Cubans, just like martians, and they were students in no way poor, most came from moneyed communist families in their countries.gl
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Old 07-12-2013, 05:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
The Cuban colony in the US is different from other Latino groups. No other Latin American country witnessed practically its entire upper and upper middle classes move to the US in a period of one decade.

Most other Latino groups in the US are made up, for the most part, by lower and working class people, many of whom are originally country folks.

Its a similar reason for why the Cuban colony is also among the whitest.



Cubans, even the lowest scum that came though Mariel, does not have anything to do with Hispanic groups. Not only the "golden exile" and the corresponding "white nomenklatura" in Cuba, but the humble "New Man" brainwashed by communist propaganda that arrives to Hialeah.

For Cubans, Hispanic America is more foreign than countries they have had relations during centuries (Spain, East Block, US, Canada).

The historic isolation of Cuba, during 4 centuries a Spanish colony and 40 years as a Comecon and Pact of Varsovia member, a vast "Gallego" immigration, and the sensation of being an isolated island, the entire detachment from the surrounding world during two generation, the pervasive education, brainwashing media, unbridled nationalism, whatever.

Cubans have nothing to do with the rest, not better or worse, entirely different.
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Old 07-13-2013, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Is the high degree of education the reason that the late Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez sought cancer treatment in Cuba? Or was it because he was afraid his nation's doctors would try to kill him?
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Old 07-13-2013, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedorreropop View Post
Cubans, even the lowest scum that came though Mariel...
Only a minority of "Marielitos" were from prisons or mental institutions. It's ironic, isn't it, that this generation was the group that supposedly benefitted from the "revolution"!
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Old 07-13-2013, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Zurich
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Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Is the high degree of education the reason that the late Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez sought cancer treatment in Cuba? Or was it because he was afraid his nation's doctors would try to kill him?
I think it was because he was afraid of Venezuelans killing him. There were other people in his party that were trying to gain power and Chavez was the one blocking their access. They could have killed him at a moment's notice. They were probably rejoicing when he died.
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Old 07-13-2013, 11:10 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 4 days ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Is the high degree of education the reason that the late Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez sought cancer treatment in Cuba? Or was it because he was afraid his nation's doctors would try to kill him?
The "official" story is that he went to Cuba to be 100% that no one will kill him, but it could had also been a way to support Cuba. He was very close to Castro and Cuba, so...

The fact that the Cubans couldn't save him speaks badly of their system. The death of Chavez probably prompted other governments to scrutinize Cuba's education system a little harder and that is probably why Brazil found the cracks and decided to not use Cuban doctors.
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Old 07-13-2013, 11:13 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 4 days ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedorreropop View Post
Cubans, even the lowest scum that came though Mariel, does not have anything to do with Hispanic groups. Not only the "golden exile" and the corresponding "white nomenklatura" in Cuba, but the humble "New Man" brainwashed by communist propaganda that arrives to Hialeah.

For Cubans, Hispanic America is more foreign than countries they have had relations during centuries (Spain, East Block, US, Canada).

The historic isolation of Cuba, during 4 centuries a Spanish colony and 40 years as a Comecon and Pact of Varsovia member, a vast "Gallego" immigration, and the sensation of being an isolated island, the entire detachment from the surrounding world during two generation, the pervasive education, brainwashing media, unbridled nationalism, whatever.

Cubans have nothing to do with the rest, not better or worse, entirely different.
That's what you say, but Cubans themselves are the ones that claim that places like Puerto Rico or Dominican Republic reminds them of their home countries, and its not simply due to the scenery. They don't really say that of any other Latin American countries though.

The way the people are is very much in tune with those two places of the Spanish Caribbean than with anywhere else.

If you know Spanish, you can hear the Cuban lady in this video say that of all the countries she has lived in, its the Dominican Republic that has the greatest similarities to her native Cuba:



I have also been told by many Cubans that they feel Puerto Rico reminds them of their island too. I can't find a video of a Cuban saying this though.

Here's a Spaniard (Pau Dones) that says that his recent visit to the Dominican Republic reminded him of his time in Cuba (in Spanish, but I think you can use an internet translator to read it in English): http://listindiario.com.do/entreteni...a-y-a-su-flaca

Last edited by AntonioR; 07-13-2013 at 11:26 PM..
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