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Old 09-28-2023, 03:18 PM
 
983 posts, read 859,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
And someone looking like Obama, but not having a white parent, would NOT be considered "black".

Face it. In Brazil the goal is to be "white" and to avoid the stigma of being "black" so we see complete double standards in how mixed "white" and mixed "black" self identify and are perceived. And these trends are even worse amongst the upwardly mobile, where whiteness is especially prized.

If Brazil boasts about how mixed it is why dont mixed whites self identify as mixed, as their black equivalent does? Brazil is a heirarchy with blacks living in the basement, and with all seeking to avoid being trapped there. I do not see why it is better than the USA in the way that blacks are stigmatized.
someone with non-white features who is considered white in Brazil would be someone like this famous singer here.

https://www.google.com.br/search?sca...&bih=486&dpr=1

You Anglo Americans or Anglo Caribbean people exaggerate when you say that someone like Ice-T or Obama is not considered and considers themselves black or suffers less racism than a more African-looking black person in Brazil.


Look at this news that just came out, it says that this woman is the first BLACK minister in Brazil (superior judge of last instance).

Look at her in the video, she looks more like Meghan Markle than Obama and yet she is considered BLACK.

https://noticias.uol.com.br/politica...ira-sessao.htm
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Old 09-28-2023, 05:08 PM
 
979 posts, read 334,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EVANGELISTTI View Post
You Anglo Americans or Anglo Caribbean people exaggerate when you say that someone like Ice-T or Obama is not considered and considers themselves black or suffers less racism than a more African-looking black person in Brazil.
]
I am the one that mentioned ice-t. I am not Anglo, far from it. I used ice-t as an example because I have actually heard Black Latinos (non Anglos) and others say He's not black. I am actually darker than Ice-t and have been told I am white by Africans.

I have never heard anyone say Obama is not considered Black.

Last edited by Luisito80; 09-28-2023 at 05:34 PM..
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Old 09-28-2023, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Somewhere on the Moon.
9,747 posts, read 14,581,150 times
Reputation: 10030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luisito80 View Post
I am the one that mentioned ice-t. I am not Anglo, far from it. I used ice-t as an example because I have actually heard Black Latinos (non Anglos) and others say He's not black. I am actually darker than Ice-t and have been told I am white by Africans.

I have never heard anyone say Obama is not considered Black.
It will also depends if you see the person in photos or in person. For whatever reason, photos exacerbate African features on many people. Then you see them in person and it isn't you can't see it, rather the things that looked very African in photos don't look as much in person. In other cases it could be the opposite (you see someone in person and then see a photo of them, this happened a lot when Facebook started to become popular as many people that I have seen in person for years suddenly appeared in photos there.) Why this contrast exist I have no idea, but it's something I noticed. This is especially true when it comes to the nose and the lips.
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Old 09-29-2023, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Brazil
100 posts, read 58,927 times
Reputation: 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
I do not see you opining about why those with dominant Euro ancestry but whose Afro and/or Indigenous ancestry is visible are not identifying as mixed.
That is a discurse of people who don't accept that exist a lot of whites in Brazil or trying minimize Brazil white population.
A small minority of white Brazilians have visible amerindian or african ancestry. I don't see visible african or amerindian traits in the majority white population of my state or in everyday life. See famous white brazilian youtubers, models, beauty pageants and tell me how many percent of them have visible African or amerindian ancestors.Pardo Brazilians who have visible african and amerindian ancestors the skin colour, the hair, the nose.
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