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Old 09-28-2013, 09:59 PM
 
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I'm referring to the English speaking countries. Also can some of you tell the difference between them? How is a Bahamian accent different from a Jamaican accent different from a Barbadian accent etc?

Last edited by Motion; 09-28-2013 at 10:12 PM..
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Old 09-28-2013, 10:22 PM
 
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I saw this some years back on tv.




The Story of English episode 9 - Next Year's Words - Part 4 / 7 - YouTube
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Old 09-29-2013, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Caribbean
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Simple...from the different influences on each of the islands. Yes, I can usually tell the difference though it is somewhat hard to explain. Trini accents are very sing songish. Barbadian accents reflect strong Irish/Scottish influence. Cruzans pronounce the letter "r" very hard etc.
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Old 09-29-2013, 08:53 PM
 
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^


I think for most people in the U.S who aren't accustomed to hearing these accents or comparing them they can all sound about the same.
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Caribbean
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
^

I think for most people in the U.S who aren't accustomed to hearing these accents or comparing them they can all sound about the same.
Yes, I hear people often say that...likely because they know the accents are from the Caribbean and they can't easily understand them. So...all the same to them.
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
Simple...from the different influences on each of the islands. Yes, I can usually tell the difference though it is somewhat hard to explain. Trini accents are very sing songish. Barbadian accents reflect strong Irish/Scottish influence. Cruzans pronounce the letter "r" very hard etc.
Since many in the English speaking caribbean are African descendants has anyone been able to breakdown the African influence on how they speak?
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Old 10-01-2013, 09:51 AM
 
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Easy

Slaves from various regions of West and Central Africa all belonged to the Niger-Congo language family. When they arrived on the islands, each ethnic group with their own sub language were forced to pick up the Queen's English. All of this created a hybridized accent from various influences with English being the language.
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Old 10-01-2013, 09:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Motion View Post
Since many in the English speaking caribbean are African descendants has anyone been able to breakdown the African influence on how they speak?

It's in need of heavy research. Linguists and computer scientists need funding to break down mutations and admixture of languages and dialects around the world.

Linguistics and genetics are very similar.
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Old 10-05-2013, 03:18 AM
 
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Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
It's in need of heavy research. Linguists and computer scientists need funding to break down mutations and admixture of languages and dialects around the world.

Linguistics and genetics are very similar.
There is lots of reports done on linguistics especially on Afrodiasporic populations. Look up John M Lipski. His scholarly work is utterly detailed and impressive.
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Old 10-05-2013, 03:19 AM
 
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Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
It's in need of heavy research. Linguists and computer scientists need funding to break down mutations and admixture of languages and dialects around the world.

Linguistics and genetics are very similar.
How are linguistics and genetics related and/or very similar?
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