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Old 12-10-2013, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Hollywood, CA
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Is it Trinidad? Or is it another Anglo Caribbean Island?

 
Old 12-10-2013, 07:45 PM
 
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Trinidad with St Kitts in a close second.
 
Old 12-10-2013, 11:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
Trinidad with St Kitts in a close second.

Don't know where you get St Kitts/Nevis. It is 90% African, 5% mixed, with the rest being Indians (Guyanese and Asian Indians) and whites (mainly expat villa residents and people connected to the 4 offshore medical colleges).


The answer is Trinidad where 20% self identify as mixed, and Guyana (you guys tossed us out of South America), which has almost as many self identified mixed people.

And what is interesting about the mixed population in these countries is that it isn't just the normal Afro Euro mix. There are other mixtures, also involving Indians, Chinese, Amerindians, and the triracial mixtures who migrated to Trinidad from Venezuela.

And that also leads to interesting cultural behavior. A dougla (Afro East Indian mix) from Trinidad told me that he goes to the Catholic church, the Hindu temple, or the Orisha (African based religion) palais, depending on his mood.
 
Old 12-11-2013, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Caribbean
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Trinidad is the most mixed of the English-speaking Caribbean islands. If we include more than islands, then Guyana as well.

As caribny said, these places are not just the afro/euro mixture that predominates in the rest of the Caribbean (english, spanish, french etc).

In terms of individual heritages...while the self-identified mixed population is close to a quarter of the population, half or more of Trinidad is mixed, even if a good bit identify as East Indian or African. It's not uncommon for an East Indian or African to have a Chinese grandparent or mixed grandparent from Venezuela etc. The same is likely true for Guyana.

These countries are different because even though they are quite mixed, the ethnic groupa are still distinct. The societies are truly mixed in terms of ethnic background, culture, religion, language etc.
 
Old 12-12-2013, 02:30 AM
 
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Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
Trinidad is the most mixed of the English-speaking Caribbean islands. If we include more than islands, then Guyana as well.

As caribny said, these places are not just the afro/euro mixture that predominates in the rest of the Caribbean (english, spanish, french etc).

In terms of individual heritages...while the self-identified mixed population is close to a quarter of the population, half or more of Trinidad is mixed, even if a good bit identify as East Indian or African. It's not uncommon for an East Indian or African to have a Chinese grandparent or mixed grandparent from Venezuela etc. The same is likely true for Guyana.

These countries are different because even though they are quite mixed, the ethnic groupa are still distinct. The societies are truly mixed in terms of ethnic background, culture, religion, language etc.

If you want an even more diverse society with an even broader array of ethnic combinations try Suriname. It has every thing that Tdad and Guyana have. Plus Javanese and Maroons who together account for overt 1/3 of the population. Maroons retaining a culture that is way more African than that of the Creoles in Suriname and their counterparts in Tdad and Guyana.

Indeed every ethnic group in Suriname has its own language (not dialect). Though Dutch is the official, Srnan Tongo (the creole language) being used broadly by every one for colloquial purposes, and English seems to be widely spoken, at least in Paramaribo, and in Nickerie, which is across the river from Guyana. So this means that ethnic identity must be even more defined in Suriname than in either Guyana or Trinidad.
 
Old 12-12-2013, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Caribbean
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
If you want an even more diverse society with an even broader array of ethnic combinations try Suriname. It has every thing that Tdad and Guyana have. Plus Javanese and Maroons who together account for overt 1/3 of the population. Maroons retaining a culture that is way more African than that of the Creoles in Suriname and their counterparts in Tdad and Guyana.

Indeed every ethnic group in Suriname has its own language (not dialect). Though Dutch is the official, Srnan Tongo (the creole language) being used broadly by every one for colloquial purposes, and English seems to be widely spoken, at least in Paramaribo, and in Nickerie, which is across the river from Guyana. So this means that ethnic identity must be even more defined in Suriname than in either Guyana or Trinidad.
Yes, Suriname is more diverse for sure. It's a place that I definitely want to visit at least once. The cultural preservation there has always amazed me.
 
Old 12-12-2013, 09:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
Yes, Suriname is more diverse for sure. It's a place that I definitely want to visit at least once. The cultural preservation there has always amazed me.

Well I guess the srnan tongo is like your French creole, except that they did a better job in preserving it. Suriname used to be a British colony until the mid 17th century they swapped it for Manhattan. Just goes to show how profitable those Caribbean colonies were in those days!

Srnan tongo is actually an English creole, deeper than any of ours due to its isolation from English. Its possible that this is how Africans from different linguistic groups spoke to each other if they were involved in the chain of trading ultimately connecting to the British.

Also the Dutch are multilingual and one can see that in their colonies as well, vs. the extremely monolingual (with connected dialects) former British colonies.
 
Old 12-13-2013, 08:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
Don't know where you get St Kitts/Nevis. It is 90% African, 5% mixed, with the rest being Indians (Guyanese and Asian Indians) and whites (mainly expat villa residents and people connected to the 4 offshore medical colleges).


The answer is Trinidad where 20% self identify as mixed, and Guyana (you guys tossed us out of South America), which has almost as many self identified mixed people.

And what is interesting about the mixed population in these countries is that it isn't just the normal Afro Euro mix. There are other mixtures, also involving Indians, Chinese, Amerindians, and the triracial mixtures who migrated to Trinidad from Venezuela.

And that also leads to interesting cultural behavior. A dougla (Afro East Indian mix) from Trinidad told me that he goes to the Catholic church, the Hindu temple, or the Orisha (African based religion) palais, depending on his mood.
At least it has a mixed percentage. Most islands' mixed populations are almost non existent.
 
Old 12-13-2013, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Caribbean
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Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
At least it has a mixed percentage. Most islands' mixed populations are almost non existent.
Not true at all...

St. Vincent & the Grenadines - 19%
Cayman Islands - 40%
St. Lucia - 11.9%
Grenada - 13%
Dominica -8.9%
Jamaica 6%

St. Kitts & Nevis has a smaller mixed population and is less mixed in terms of ethnic diversity than half of the other islands, if not the majority of them...
 
Old 12-13-2013, 06:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
Not true at all...

St. Vincent & the Grenadines - 19%
Cayman Islands - 40%
St. Lucia - 11.9%
Grenada - 13%
Dominica -8.9%
Jamaica 6%

St. Kitts & Nevis has a smaller mixed population and is less mixed in terms of ethnic diversity than half of the other islands, if not the majority of them...

I said most, not all.

I forgot about SVG though. lol
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