U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-13-2016, 11:39 AM
 
Location: London, UK
2,431 posts, read 1,257,236 times
Reputation: 1337

Advertisements

The Guajira has the largest Muslim population in Colombia and one of the largest mosques in Latin America.


Wikimedia Commons


Masjid Omar Ibn Al Khattab


Maicao Panoramio 18665575 by Pueblo Fuerte, on Flickr


By José Luis Sánchez Hachero


Painting the Mosque
by Julian Castro, on Flickr


Maicao TatoBerrio by Pueblo Fuerte, on Flickr


Students in Dar El Akram
by Kaveh Kazemi, on gettyimages
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-13-2016, 11:45 AM
 
Location: London, UK
2,431 posts, read 1,257,236 times
Reputation: 1337
Home video of Dabke in Maicao, Guajira (excuse the quality)




Shakira is of half-Lebanese descent




Latinos en la Casa (90's Arab-Colombian group)

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2016, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Toronto
6,754 posts, read 3,377,708 times
Reputation: 4619
There seems to be so much diversity in Colombia in so many levels. I am really confused as to what to actually expect. I always new about some Arab populations in Colombia via comments made by people I have met from Colombia, but I am even more curious about how well they are integrated. I really don't think I am goi g to get a good enough taste of Colombia in 1 week. This is going to be tricky getting what I want out of this trip.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2016, 06:54 AM
 
Location: London, UK
2,431 posts, read 1,257,236 times
Reputation: 1337
In reality Venezuela, Brazil and Argentina has more European diversity. All three favoured migration policies whereas Colombia was more suspicious of Marxist and Anarchist tendencies from Europe around the turn of the last century.

However, when it comes to Native American and African diversity, Colombia is by far more diverse and more traditionalist. It also has more cultural expressions that reflect its ethnic make-up mainly due to geographical isolation, a result of the extreme topography.

Re: Arab migration; it happened in three waves, first in the 1870/80's then again in the early 20th century and a final wave in the 1970's. Most are fully integrated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2016, 11:36 AM
 
Location: USA
568 posts, read 845,674 times
Reputation: 404
[quote=Pueblofuerte;43340121]New Vallenato...


Jorge Celedon




Celedón is the man!!
Saw him at the Colombian Festival years ago, at the time he had the song "Ay Hombre" on the airwaves of Miami (Radio Caracol) and he had everyone singing along.
Had to chime that one in.

Carry on.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2016, 07:06 PM
 
Location: London, UK
2,431 posts, read 1,257,236 times
Reputation: 1337
Hey cholo thanks for the chime in!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2016, 07:21 PM
 
Location: London, UK
2,431 posts, read 1,257,236 times
Reputation: 1337
Even Brazilians are in on the Vallenato, they definitely know how to add cheese to it though!

Original by Fanny Lu




Original by Carlos Vives




Original by Fonseca

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2016, 11:07 PM
 
Location: London, UK
2,431 posts, read 1,257,236 times
Reputation: 1337
Many of the classic Dominican Bachata and Merengue songs were actually covers of old Vallenato songs.

Originals by Los Diablitos





Original by Los Inquietos

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2016, 12:24 AM
 
Location: Toronto
6,754 posts, read 3,377,708 times
Reputation: 4619
Default Carlos Vives

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
Even Brazilians are in on the Vallenato, they definitely know how to add cheese to it though!

Original by Fanny Lu




Original by Carlos Vives




Original by Fonseca

I saw Carlos Vives live this fall and he was really good. The concert was with Marc Anthony, also great, but Carlos played the 2nd half of the night and was a more entertaining.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2016, 11:51 AM
 
Location: London, UK
2,431 posts, read 1,257,236 times
Reputation: 1337
Ok finally to wrap up the Guajira region and the wider Vallenato culture I leave examples of the two remaining sub-genres of Vallenato and the two main cities, Riohacha and Valledupar and a trailer of a film that depicts the mystical history and folklore surrounding Vallenato.

Los Viajes del Viento (Trailer)


Riohacha


Riohacha by Alturas Fotografia Aerea, on Flickr


Flamencos_Riohacha by Robinson Galindo Tarazona, on Flickr


Valledupar


panoramica Plaza Alfonso López de Valledupar by david vargas, on Flickr


Source: Megamall Valledupar

Los Viajes del Viento
Genre: Puya Vallenata




La Brasilera
Genre: Merengue Vallenato

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top