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Old 05-06-2018, 08:01 AM
 
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Two years ago the government of Colombia made a peace treaty with FARC. What's the mood of the country two years later? Did the government also make a peace treaty with ELN?
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Old 05-06-2018, 09:15 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Two years ago the government of Colombia made a peace treaty with FARC. What's the mood of the country two years later? Did the government also make a peace treaty with ELN?
Not good. The majority of people are against the peace deal with the FARC, in fact one of the presidential candidates has threatened to overturn the peace deal and is in the lead in the polls.

People don't want to give the FARC the impunity they desire, also there are criminal elements now filling up regions the FARC once controlled. 2017 was one of the worst human rights abuses on record.

Peace talks had begun with the ELN in Ecuador but recently due to issues in that country Ecuador removed its hosting support. Norway, Cuba and Uruguay have offered to be the host for peace talks, it seems Cuba will be the host again although I don't see much happening until we find out who the next president of Colombia is going to be this year.

At the end of the day the peace talks with guerilla movements are a farse. These are not political movements, these are drug dealers and extortionists. The focus needs to be on legalisation if this is ever going to get resolved but the US will never agree to that so a doomed "war on drugs" will probably rage for another 30 years just with differently named players because the people remain the same its just the title that changes.
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Old 05-06-2018, 10:58 AM
 
24,221 posts, read 17,610,929 times
Reputation: 9150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
Not good. The majority of people are against the peace deal with the FARC, in fact one of the presidential candidates has threatened to overturn the peace deal and is in the lead in the polls.

People don't want to give the FARC the impunity they desire, also there are criminal elements now filling up regions the FARC once controlled. 2017 was one of the worst human rights abuses on record.

Peace talks had begun with the ELN in Ecuador but recently due to issues in that country Ecuador removed its hosting support. Norway, Cuba and Uruguay have offered to be the host for peace talks, it seems Cuba will be the host again although I don't see much happening until we find out who the next president of Colombia is going to be this year.

At the end of the day the peace talks with guerilla movements are a farse. These are not political movements, these are drug dealers and extortionists. The focus needs to be on legalisation if this is ever going to get resolved but the US will never agree to that so a doomed "war on drugs" will probably rage for another 30 years just with differently named players because the people remain the same its just the title that changes.
The US itself has been legalising and decriminalising drugs on a state by state basis. NYC is now preparing to offer sites for people to safely shoot IV drugs. Oregon after legalising marijuana defelonized 6 other drugs. Itís more out in the open about white Americans using drugs so the war on drugs is winding down.

I donít think the Colombian government has the resources to punish FARC. Not signing peace means the battle will continue. Of course criminal elements will fight to fill the void.

I do think legalisation is part of the answer, but Colombia will also needs greater economic development to curb crime. This is true even in places like the US. Big cities like NYC are a lot safer since the 80s in part to various forms of investment. Various types of communist/third world liberation movements screwed South America over during the Cold War.

To an extent coca production is legal in Colombia. Natives can grow coca leaves for tea and other purposes. In Peru and Bolivia legalisation is further along, abs a number of coca products that arenít cocsine are sold. Weed production is legal in Colombia and Canadian companies have license for export.
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