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Old 10-18-2018, 12:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrizeWinner View Post
Low self esteem .
Run along and continue to play with the PPP and scream that they were the best people ever and that all of the problems of Guyana are due to the PNC and Afro Guyanese.

You are quite tiresome. I really am not that interested in what you have to say.
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Old 10-18-2018, 03:33 PM
 
295 posts, read 182,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
Run along and continue to play with the PPP and scream that they were the best people ever and that all of the problems of Guyana are due to the PNC and Afro Guyanese.

You are quite tiresome. I really am not that interested in what you have to say.
I never said Afro- Guyanese, I said specifically the PNC.PNC doesn't have the support of all Afro-Guyanese as I said before thats why they needed help last election having an alliance with AFC but won't they get lucky next time.Its funny you talk with conviction when it was Afro Guyanese that helped to start opposition parties like WPA and the new AFC party.



But go ahead and tell us the good things the PNC did, all you can do is play a blame game like the typical wasteman .

I like how you show up all of a sudden from a 3 week or a month hiatus, and now say you are not interested in anything I have to say.

Last edited by PrizeWinner; 10-18-2018 at 03:47 PM..
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Old 10-18-2018, 06:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrizeWinner View Post
I never said Afro- Guyanese, I said specifically the PNC.PNC doesn't have the support of all Afro-Guyanese .


The early 1960s was about PNC supporters (mainly blacks) and PPP supporters (mainly Indians) attacking each other. You put all the blame on the PNC.


Look boy if you love the PPP that's your right, but please don't pretend to be objective and please don't pretend that politics in Guyana isnt mainly motivated by race.

And if indeed you are a Guyanese and not a troll (which I suspect that you are as your rants seem informed by Wikipedia or google) you will also know that "PNC" and "PPP" are code words in Guyana for blacks and Indians. You cannot separate these parties from their ethnic support bases because without this they wouldn't be still in power after 60 years of failure (BOTH the PNC and the PPP).
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Old 10-19-2018, 06:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
I am not going to say which system is better. The identities which developed are a function of how each society was run and what blacks and browns had to do to empower themselves.

And btw the identities in the non Hispanic Caribbean are radically different from that of Latin America. Its more of a 3 tier system with white, brown and black. And blacks are very empowered to discuss issues of race unlike what we see in the DR and even to a degree Brazil, where they are shamed into silence with the few who do this stigmatized.

In fact the whites and the browns keep their opinions about blacks very quiet and no longer overtly discriminate against them. This because, unlike most parts of the world (outside of Africa) blacks do in fact have the power to discriminate against them as well.

And yes the skin color complex is visible in ALL societies where blacks live. Ironically even sub Saharan Africa where skin bleaching has now reached serious epidemic proportions. And they didn't go through slavery and their colonial period was much less disastrous in attempting to erase their identities.
Both of these systems in the Americas are two different approaches of the white supremacy system which
evolved to justify African slavery, both systems are not better than the other.

The Anglo system says: "Let's get rid of the Black by keeping it away from us, let's segregate it, keep our ancestries pure least we be tainted."

The Latin system says: "Let's get rid of the Black by mixing with it, maybe we can bleach it out and dilute it
and it will disappear.

In BOTH systems the idea is "Let's get rid of the Black".

In the Bahamas, I was told by a black Bahamian the only difference was that in the States, black and colored was just lumped together as black, while in the English Caribbean, it was White, Colored and Black.

The South African system seems similar with the same classification labels (Dutch and English) non-Latin systems.

This skin color complex is global, the Indian sub-continent and Asia suffers from this as well they have
bleaching issues as in sub-Saharan Africa.

In Asia's case, they have always had a choice toward lighter skin, and colonialism cemented this belief in
stone. In sub-Saharan Africa it might be based on "white = powerful ,wealthy and civilized" .

I am now curious of how black Caribbean people view brown Black Americans when they come to the States? I have had family members who had black Haitian neighbors on both sides and across the street
and had no issue whatsoever and who were very helpful to us with a family issue that arose.
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Old 10-20-2018, 04:42 PM
 
295 posts, read 182,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agbor View Post
Both of these systems in the Americas are two different approaches of the white supremacy system which
evolved to justify African slavery, both systems are not better than the other.

The Anglo system says: "Let's get rid of the Black by keeping it away from us, let's segregate it, keep our ancestries pure least we be tainted."

The Latin system says: "Let's get rid of the Black by mixing with it, maybe we can bleach it out and dilute it
and it will disappear.

In BOTH systems the idea is "Let's get rid of the Black".

In the Bahamas, I was told by a black Bahamian the only difference was that in the States, black and colored was just lumped together as black, while in the English Caribbean, it was White, Colored and Black.

The South African system seems similar with the same classification labels (Dutch and English) non-Latin systems.

This skin color complex is global, the Indian sub-continent and Asia suffers from this as well they have
bleaching issues as in sub-Saharan Africa.

In Asia's case, they have always had a choice toward lighter skin, and colonialism cemented this belief in
stone. In sub-Saharan Africa it might be based on "white = powerful ,wealthy and civilized" .

I am now curious of how black Caribbean people view brown Black Americans when they come to the States? I have had family members who had black Haitian neighbors on both sides and across the street
and had no issue whatsoever and who were very helpful to us with a family issue that arose.
Most of black Caribbeans don't have a problem with African Americans at all,some even identify as African American later on when they come to the states hence why you names like Jamericans. Most Caribbean individuals base their judgement dealing with an African American on a personal basis not from a collective stand point.
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Old 10-22-2018, 08:59 PM
 
295 posts, read 182,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
The early 1960s was about PNC supporters (mainly blacks) and PPP supporters (mainly Indians) attacking each other. You put all the blame on the PNC.


Look boy if you love the PPP that's your right, but please don't pretend to be objective and please don't pretend that politics in Guyana isnt mainly motivated by race.

And if indeed you are a Guyanese and not a troll (which I suspect that you are as your rants seem informed by Wikipedia or google) you will also know that "PNC" and "PPP" are code words in Guyana for blacks and Indians. You cannot separate these parties from their ethnic support bases because without this they wouldn't be still in power after 60 years of failure (BOTH the PNC and the PPP).
Let me clear the air about this, the PNC does not have the support of all blacks. Since many blacks in Guyana didn't vote the PNC in the past didnt have the support of all the Afro-Guyanese, that is why many of them rigged the election.

Many blacks followed the PNC out of fear, remember the only reason PNC got into power was because it was a British puppet not support by the people,so Burnham had to make the country's problems a race issue and not commit to real issues like sustaining the economy and the country's industries when the British business Tycoons left.

You can be a PNC whipping boy and cry about race ,it doesn't change the fact the PNC can't even keep itself intact today thats why they are hiding under the banner of the APNU.
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Old 10-26-2018, 12:35 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,941,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrizeWinner View Post
Let me clear the air about this, the PNC does not have the support of all blacks. .
Good afternoon. The PNC is good for 40% of the votes. The African identified voting age population is just over 30%. Few Indians or Amerindians support them. Now conjecture what % of the black vote that they must be getting.

And fear didn't account for this support either as during the Burnham dictatorship elections were rigged.
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Old 10-29-2018, 12:30 AM
 
295 posts, read 182,042 times
Reputation: 85
Default CaribNY Where Do You Get Your Facts

Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
Good afternoon. The PNC is good for 40% of the votes. The African identified voting age population is just over 30%. Few Indians or Amerindians support them. Now conjecture what % of the black vote that they must be getting.

And fear didn't account for this support either as during the Burnham dictatorship elections were rigged.
What are you talking about Afro-Guyanese didn't support him out of fear? It seems to go over your head that the PNC wasn't the only party when Burnham introduced the PNC. Parties like the UDP and UF around,later on WPA came about and faced the same issues.



Burnham literally strong armed Eusi Kwayana to step down from his position with UDP at the time , in which the UDP had an alliance with PNC too, he gained a stronger following than Burnham then threatened.

Burnham also needed an alliance with UF to go against the PPP.


Same thing with Walter Rodney he gained popularity and Burnham hunted him.If Burnham had support from all the Afro-Guyanese why did many prominent and popular figure heads like Rodney and Kwayana objected to him.

When Burnham's regime came in many cops were so brutal and henchmen like the House of Israel were used to intimidate the populace.

Nice try but the Afro-Guyanese population 29%, the only about half of those people vote ,before Carter came in to intervene it was mostly voter padding and rigging of elections.

Afro-Guyanese do not truly support the PNC , many support them just because, thats why the PNC needed the alliance with AFC. The PNC can't even keep its name original and hide behind the name of APNU.
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Old 12-08-2018, 02:17 AM
 
295 posts, read 182,042 times
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Indentured servitude is the reason why many different people came to places like Guyana. This article explains why the Portuguese came to Guyana 6 times more in numbers rather than other islands like Trinidad. Guyana was a breadbasket and had many fertile farmlands for laborers to work on after Emancipation. Some of these Portuguese were also from Cape Verde and Brazil too.

Portuguese went to other islands like St Vincent ,Jamaica and Trinidad later on but they received low numbers. The Portuguese settled in Trinidad the least in comparison to other British West Indies country.
Quote:
https://www.researchgate.net/publica...ative_Overview


While other territories officially received just 2,500 emigrants or fewer
in the first three decades of Madeiran migration, Guyana received tens of
thousands of Madeirans.
During the mid-nineteenth century, Guyana alone
accounted for 70 percent of all Madeiran migration
to the former British
Caribbean, official and unofficial.
26
At that time, Madeirans were heading to other destinations, such as Brazil and the United States (until 1910),including Hawaii.
28
By 1861, there were 21,811 Portuguese citizens in Guyana,which ultimately welcomed some 40,000 emigrants.
30









Trinidad attempted to replicate Guyana’s success by experimenting with
Madeiran labor
, and also with other European laborers from France,
Germany and Britain. It was also suggested that Canary Islanders, many of
whom had begun to migrate to Venezuela and later Cuba, be sought after
as indentured laborers. They did not go to Trinidad and Madeirans instead
were drafted for local estate labor. Thus the first Madeirans destined for
Trinidad arrived in May 1846, following those who went to Guyana and St.
Vincent.



The Portuguese in Trinidad were in fact never indentured as the
Indians were
. Indenture proper, that is, contracts enforceable by criminal
law, was introduced in Trinidad in 1848, after the arrival of the first Por-
tuguese.
This first indenture contract was only a one year contract (longer
contracts were introduced in 1850 and in 1862) and applied to Indians and others on the indenture scheme.

Many of the Madeirans in Trinidad quickly forsook field labor in favor of
other less strenuous occupations, and some were attracted by the higher
wages earned as gardeners and servants.
35
Although Trinidad was the first British Caribbean territory to receive
Portuguese migrants from the Azores in 1834 as noted earlier, officially
speaking, of all the territories, Trinidad received the lowest numbers of mi-
grant workers without fixed contracts.


Wood cites a figure of 1,298 mi-
grants in seven shiploads arriving in Trinidad between May 1846 and
November 1847, a period of only two years.
3





In
fact, in both Guyana and St. Vincent, there were several uprisings against
the Portuguese in the nineteenth century. By the twentieth century, any
existing anti-Portuguese sentiments took non-violent, non-physical forms,
but hostile undercurrents were nevertheless present in some territories


Finally, in the twentieth cen-
tury, ethnocultural clubs were disallowed in Guyana, despite the existence
of Portuguese social and cultural clubs for several years in that territory.
Based on government policy aimed at ending all socially entrenched forms
of discrimination, all ethnic clubs had to change their names to ones that
did not reflect an ethnic base or bias; the Portuguese club therefore became
Non Pareil Park, the Chinese club became Cosmos, and the Indian sports
club became Everest.




Of the four territories, in question, only Guyana was considered a real
socio-economic success in terms of Portuguese migration.
However, after
Guyana, Trinidad became the single most important destination for Madei-
ran migrants

There the Portuguese were accorded a place in the national
census until 1960 as an ethnic group large and distinct enough to be seen
as separate from other Europeans.

Last edited by PrizeWinner; 12-08-2018 at 02:29 AM..
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Old 12-09-2018, 12:53 AM
 
295 posts, read 182,042 times
Reputation: 85
https://guyanatimesgy.com/multicultural-practice/


Multicultural practice
November 6, 2017
In the political crisis roiling Guyana presently, the ethnic divisions have become very stark. The need for a commitment to multicultural practices becomes imperative. A “multicultural practice” means there will be fair and equitable treatment of others by individuals, groups, and institutions.
Instead of racism and discrimination, there will be respectful and equal treatment of individuals and groups from any ethnic, racial, or immigrant background.
With the vast majority of Guyanese brought to Guyana in the last three hundred years, we do not have the tools to imagine a nation “looming out of an immemorial past”. But while we will have to accept the diversity we find ourselves with, we will also have to hone some kind of unity so that we may achieve what most modern states are expected to deliver to their citizens – at a minimum, civil peace.




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