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Old 08-31-2018, 11:32 AM
 
Location: DC metropolitan area
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What are contemporary race relations like between East Indians and Blacks in Guyana, Trinidad, and Suriname? Immediately after independence, Guyana had some horrific violence between the two groups and they have tended to view each other as obstacles to each own's emancipation since then. Political party voting is generally straight down racial lines. Trinidad has similar political party affiliation and voting dynamics. In Suriname, the presence of a Javanese population has served as a kind of third rail, mitigating inter-racial rivalry between Blacks and East Indians, but political party affiliation is still strongly influenced by the racial identity of the voter.

There has been an interesting rise of a *mixed-race* class of people in all three countries. In Guyana, between 1980 and 2012, *mixed-race* rose from 11.2% to 19.9% of the population. In Trinidad (and Tobago), *mixed-race* increased from 16.5% to 24.2% over the same period. Finally, in Suriname *mixed-race* grew from 12.5% to 13.4% between 2004 and 2012.

Who are these *mixed-race* people? Are they a sign that historical antagonisms or separation between Blacks and East Indians are breaking down, as in members of each group marrying each other? Or are they Blacks or *Creoles* increasingly defining themselves as *mixed-race*, which many of them genetically are? Or can it be explained by some other phenomenon?
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Old 08-31-2018, 11:30 PM
 
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What do these countries view as "mixed race"? I am very interested to know. I think of Trinidad as a Creole country. I don't know much about Suriname and Guyana.
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Old 09-01-2018, 12:52 AM
 
Location: Caribbean
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It is important to point out that race relations among the Indian and Africans populations in the nations mentioned have been relatively peaceful compared to other groups (such as Europeans and Africans). Neither group has subjugated the other. Early on there was one major violent incident in Guyana but that’s about it. People tend to vote along racial lines when it comes to politics but, at least in Trinidad, both parties have some degree of mixture anyway.

The mixed people are of various groups. Mixtures of African, Indian, Chinese, Spanish, Amerindian, Syrian, Lebanese etc.

At least where Trinidad is concerned, many in the African/Creole population are but a number of Indians are mixed as well.
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Old 09-01-2018, 03:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by treemoni View Post
What do these countries view as "mixed race"? I am very interested to know. I think of Trinidad as a Creole country. I don't know much about Suriname and Guyana.
Suriname is very mixed but there are also very much pure ethnic individuals(meaning unmixed individuals),same case for Guyana.There is a maroon population of Akan descent in Suriname. There once were maroons in Guyana in the 18th and 19th centuries but they went to Suriname.

Guyana people of East Indian, African,Chinese/Korean,Portuguese(with some Brazilian),British,Amerindian,and a small patch of Middle Eastern. There isn't really that much indigenous Amerindians in Trinidad, most of the Amerindians there are from St Vincient ,Suriname,and Guyana.

Guyana has Amerindians that are the same stock of the Tainos,Caribs and Arawak people live there as they do in Venezuela now.

The Amerindian population is very transient since they travel back and forth to Brazil from Lethem but a lot of them live in Georgetown and Linden.

There is some Spanish influence in Guyana there was in fact a group of Vaqueros there similar to the ones you see in Mexico. 250,000 Guyanese lived in Venezuela a couple of years ago.

The Portuguese population denoted people from Azores and Madeira, but you also had Brazilian and Cape Verde population .70% of the Cape Verdians that went to Commonwealth Caribbean countries went to Guyana.

The East Indians came from places like Madrash and but most were from the Northern States but you also had a small patch of muslims from Afghan.

Now a days you have some foreigns in Guyana, such as Cubans ,Brazilians,and Venezuelans.You got some Surinamese here and there.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ReineDeCoeur View Post
It is important to point out that race relations among the Indian and Africans populations in the nations mentioned have been relatively peaceful compared to other groups (such as Europeans and Africans). Neither group has subjugated the other. Early on there was one major violent incident in Guyana but that’s about it. People tend to vote along racial lines when it comes to politics but, at least in Trinidad, both parties have some degree of mixture anyway.
I see you have no problem with being incorrect ,it wasn't a violent incident early on. The unrest and riots happened in the 1960s by political terrorist such Burnham and the PNC regime.
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Old 09-02-2018, 12:30 AM
 
Location: Caribbean
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Originally Posted by PrizeWinner View Post
I see you have no problem with being incorrect ,it wasn't a violent incident early on. The unrest and riots happened in the 1960s by political terrorist such Burnham and the PNC regime.
Not sure what you’re speaking about. That is not recent. That is closer to Guyana’s independence, not contemporary relations.
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Old 09-02-2018, 04:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReineDeCoeur View Post
Not sure what you’re speaking about. That is not recent. That is closer to Guyana’s independence, not contemporary relations.
You said early on there was a violent incident, relations between different races in Guyana were pretty much alright not a violent rivalry during the beginning from Emancipation to the end Colonial times .




Quote:
Originally Posted by ReineDeCoeur View Post
Early on there was one major violent incident in Guyana but that’s about it.
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Old 09-02-2018, 01:45 PM
 
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Thanks for the insight, guys.
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Old 09-02-2018, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Caribbean
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Originally Posted by PrizeWinner View Post
You said early on there was a violent incident, relations between different races in Guyana were pretty much alright not a violent rivalry during the beginning from Emancipation to the end Colonial times .
Near independence...we are well into the 21st century now.
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Old 09-03-2018, 10:10 AM
 
294 posts, read 180,513 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReineDeCoeur View Post
Near independence...we are well into the 21st century now.
People here don't need to know what century it is or what your definition is by early on. Fact of the matter is disturbances occurred during the 1960s that's not early on in Guyana's history (meaning Essequibo,Demerara,and Bebrice)which goes back to the 1500s regarding colonialism.
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Old 09-04-2018, 09:07 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,925,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by treemoni View Post
What do these countries view as "mixed race"? I am very interested to know. I think of Trinidad as a Creole country. I don't know much about Suriname and Guyana.
There is no defined notion as to who considers themselves "mixed". In fact one brother might identify as "black" and another as "mixed". People shouldn't try to get to complex about it.
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