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View Poll Results: Should the Dominican Republic (be allowed to) join CARICOM?
Yes. 13 72.22%
No. 5 27.78%
Voters: 18. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-26-2018, 11:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by upthere22 View Post
As Antonio explained clearly that anti-blackness thing is greatly exaggerated, BY people that always have their racist googles on.

Prostitution is legal in DR, As also is in most of Latin America. Only people with narrow, puritanical, misogynistic minds sets could think there anything wrong with that. Women can do as they please, is their constitutional right.

Only the POOR Dominican emigrate, middle class Dominicans travel for tourism but do not emigrate, why would they? But as I told you that only 30% of the country that is poor. You most likely have never interacted with he other 70% unless you went there.

And again, why are we talking about this? THIS IS NOT THE SUBJECT.
You managed (again) to bring the conversation to your favorite subject RACE
you need therapy.
I don't know if legal is the correct characterization but sure. And the if you are Latin American, you may not want to bring misogyny and narrow minds. Anyway, You cannot have a discussion about DR and CARICOM without the discussion of race and migration (as stated several times in this thread). As I stated before there is little benefit for DR to join CARICOM where all that would have is further migration of DR's trash citizens to the other islands and the associated societal ills they bring and little, if any economic benefit to the current members of CARICOM.
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Old 10-26-2018, 11:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 908Boi View Post
I don't know if legal is the correct characterization but sure. And the if you are Latin American, you may not want to bring misogyny and narrow minds. Anyway, You cannot have a discussion about DR and CARICOM without the discussion of race and migration (as stated several times in this thread). As I stated before there is little benefit for DR to join CARICOM where all that would have is further migration of DR's trash citizens to the other islands and the associated societal ills they bring and little, if any economic benefit to the current members of CARICOM.

Why is not legal the correct term? it is legal.

You dont seem to understand caricom at all, CARICOM is not an open migration block, its not like the European Union in any way. There are visas requirements, time limits ect, among the islands. Haitians for example cant move freely. DR being part or not or caricom will not affect the current migration pattern at all, as open migration is not part of the treaty as implemented today (the treaty does include a chapter about its future implementation but it haven't yet being applied fully). Also Dominicans do not need visa for a bunch of caricom countries like Trinidad, Belize, Grenada, Guyana, etc. So joining Caricom will not change much as you think it will. At this point DR is not interested in joining as they got the market access without the political baggage.

DR is pursuing bilateral agreements instead, with the 2 big countries , Trinidad and Jamaica. All the others are irrelevant. DR president visited Jamaica last year in official visit and lots of good things happened in trade and tourism, open sky policies ect. Curiously right after that Jamaica threatened to leave the block, lol. Jamaica wants to follow DR steps, as the review commission put it:

"the review commission is saying that as things are, Jamaica is not benefiting sufficiently from the CSME to warrant staying in Caricom."

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/edito...aricom-_125650

Curious that they came to that conclusion specially that their appointment included the evaluation of Jamaica's policy with DR.

"Mr Holness commissioned the report in July 2016 — with the task of reviewing Jamaica's relations within the Caribbean Community (Caricom) and CARIFORUM which is Caricom plus Spanish-speaking neighbour, the Dominican Republic."

The concussion was basically: Drop CARICOM, follow DR.

DR has a good relationship with Trinidad and Belice (its been Trinidad idea this whole thing about DR joining CARICOM to begin with). All the other micro states are not worth the effort.

Allow me to recommend this article,

https://www.antillean.org/caricom-an...reconcile-142/

Last edited by upthere22; 10-26-2018 at 12:39 PM..
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Old 10-26-2018, 02:03 PM
 
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I hope you don't actually believe that Jamaica is "following" DR....I suspect you are just having fun...there have been calls for Jamaica to drop out of CARICOM for years and there have been somewhat serious issues between Jamaica and Trinidad.. these common market agreements only benefit the rich any way
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Old 10-26-2018, 02:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whogoesthere View Post
I hope you don't actually believe that Jamaica is "following" DR....I suspect you are just having fun...there have been calls for Jamaica to drop out of CARICOM for years and there have been somewhat serious issues between Jamaica and Trinidad.. these common market agreements only benefit the rich any way
By following i mean doing it the DR way, alone. No caricom, stay in CARIFORUM, look for other horizons, do not stay put waiting for all those little guys to make up their minds.
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Old 10-26-2018, 02:24 PM
 
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Actually Jamaica hasn't been doing too great in CARICOM against the so called little guys...but that's a different topic
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Old 11-08-2018, 01:05 AM
 
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I posted this to give an idea of how much Dominicans are in a CARICOM country like Guyana. I know DRs are in a few other islands of the USVI and BVI.



https://www.caribbeannewsnow.com/201...hrough-guyana/

Quote:

Surge in Cubans and Haitians trafficking through Guyana





June 18, 20180

Gail Teixeira MP
By Ray Chickrie
Caribbean News Now contributor

GEORGETOWN, Guyana — In the past two years there has been a surge in human trafficking via Guyana, especially from Cuba and Haiti, according to a June 13 Sectoral Committee on Foreign Affairs Report chaired by PPP/C member of Parliament, Gail Teixeira, who analysed arrival and departure records that were submitted by minister of citizenship, Winston Felix, at the request of the committee.

According to the Stabroek News of Guyana, which used the figures released by the Parliamentary Committee on Foreign Affairs, “in the year 2016, 21,165 Cubans arrived and 19,225 left Guyana, a disparity of around 2,000. In 2017, the number was greater, 44,747 Cubans arrived and only 37,492 departed — roughly 7,000 unaccounted for. For this year, the trend continued, as up to April this year 22,520 Cubans had arrived but only 16,350 had been reported as having departed.”

The Stabroek News, also citing the Parliamentary report, claimed that in 2017 3,515 Haitians arrived in Guyana, but only 291 were recorded as having departed.

“Up to April this year, it was much the same: 1,238 had arrived and only 85 had been recorded as having left. These figures are disturbing,” Teixeira remarked.

There is little evidence of Cuban or Haitian settlements in Guyana and those unaccounted for are apparently not in Guyana, allegedly being trafficked out of Guyana to other countries like French Guiana (France/EU), Argentina, Chile, Suriname, the United States, and elsewhere.

Human trafficking is nothing new to Guyana. The country has been on Washington’s radar and will come under pressure from the Trump government to abolish the visa free movement of Haitians and Cubans to Guyana just like Suriname had to do last year.

Teixeira said in a letter to the media, “The annual US TIPs report placed Guyana on the watch list for two years in a row because there were too few cases of human trafficking in 2006-2013, I hope that the US officials will pay more interest to this unusual movement of people.”

Teixeira claimed that Haitians are being trafficked through Guyana, but there appears to be an additional twist to the story. More information is surfacing that, in return for their “safe passage” through Guyana, they are required and are facilitated in obtaining Guyanese identity documents such as birth certificates, national identity cards, with Guyanese names, which are then left in Guyana, after they depart. “For what purpose one may wonder and who is behind this?”

A year ago, a surge of human trafficking from Haiti via Guyana was reported by Caribbean News Now when Suriname abruptly closed its consulate in Port-au-Prince on “security” grounds. Suriname then bowed to international pressure and halted the visa free entrance of Haitians to Suriname. Guyana thus became the destination of choice for Haitians looking to get to French Guiana, the USA and beyond via Suriname. However, numerous reports on the issue in the media did not stem the flow of human trafficking via Guyana, the contrary took place.

In 2017 Guyanese authorities arrested a number of Surinamese involved in the smuggling of 27 Haitians, including 12 children, at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport (CJIA) who were on their way to French Guiana via Suriname. They arrived in Guyana on a Copa Airlines flight from Haiti via Panama, and no one was at the airport to meet them.

According to Guyana’s Kaieteur News, the police believe that the smugglers, after realizing that the investigators were onto them, did not show up at the airport.

From Guyana, it is very easy to get to Suriname and the rest of the Americas illegally through the “backtrack” without the need of a passport. It’s a breeding ground for crime, human trafficking, drugs, weapons, and pirating. The two countries have been examining ways and means of policing the illegal “backtrack” crossing via the Courantyne River that separates the two countries.

The international human trafficking network is complex and includes law enforcement officials from a number of countries far and near like Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Guyana, Haiti, India, Suriname, Venezuela and the United States. And Guyana and Suriname seem to have little capacity to address the problem.






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Old 11-16-2018, 02:16 PM
 
381 posts, read 146,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrizeWinner View Post
I posted this to give an idea of how much Dominicans are in a CARICOM country like Guyana. I know DRs are in a few other islands of the USVI and BVI.



https://www.caribbeannewsnow.com/201...hrough-guyana/
There are more Dominicans in the high school across the street from where i am siting at in Brooklyn than in the whole country of Guyana.

Last edited by upthere22; 11-16-2018 at 02:34 PM..
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Old 11-16-2018, 02:28 PM
 
295 posts, read 181,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by upthere22 View Post
There are more Dominicans in the high school across the street from where i am siting at in Brooklyn than in he whole country of Guyana.
Yep,maybe some of those Dominican teens decided to take a school trip to Guyana.
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Old 11-16-2018, 02:56 PM
 
295 posts, read 181,270 times
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Default Maybe A Little More Dominicans and Other Immigrants

But the thing is even these stats are not representative of the total number of migrants from a country in Guyana. I am not saying its much more Dominicans than that but let me put it like this. Those reports have 41,000 Brazilians arriving with more than 40,000 departing. But anyone who has been to Laceytown or (Downtown Georgetown) knows its flooded with Brazilians. There's Brazilian clothing stores(with Brazilian name brands), Brazilian restaurants ,retail shops ,and electronic shops.
This is the same for Chinese there in abundance with their shops,supermarkets,and restaurants but not as much as Brazilians there which are probably 6 times in number.

The Brazilians are there because many Guyanese of Amerindian ancestry or Buffiana(mixed) ancestry in the Lethem region move back and forth from Guyana to Brazil.Same as the Venezuelans there that live back and forth from Essequibo to Caracas.My cousins with Amerindian ancestry in the Essequibo are a perfect example of this. Although the Venezuelans have been arriving more in the past 5 few years.

Its crazy that report doesn't have Jamaicans in their listings,I've heard of Jamaicans living in Guyana but not so much Haitians.

So yea Im just saying there might be more Dominicans though, not that thick in numbers though.I ran into some down there.
I really don't see the problem immigrants in the country they don't bring crime.

Last edited by PrizeWinner; 11-16-2018 at 03:08 PM..
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Old 11-17-2018, 01:18 PM
 
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There's no way that people from the other CARICOM islands would immigrate to the Dominican Republic in large numbers if it were to join. Most other Caribbean islands are far better off than the DR as far as quality of life is concerned; some are even classified as straight-up developed countries by the UN.

Here is the UN's human development index for 2017; which measures income, health and education.

VERY HIGH HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (aka "developed countries"):
The Bahamas: #54/189 in the world
Barbados: #58/189 in the world.

HIGH HUMAN DEVELOPMENT:
Trinidad and Tobago: #69/189 in the world
Antigua & Barbuda: #70/189 in the world.
Saint Kitts & Nevis: #72/189 in the world.
Cuba: #73/189 in the world.
Grenada: #75/189 in the world.
St. Lucia# 90/189 in the world.
Dominican Republic: #94/189 in the world.
Jamaica: #97/189 in the world.
Saint Vincent: #99/189 in the world.
Dominica# 103/189 in the world.

LOW HUMAN DEVELOPMENT:
Haiti: 168/189 in the world.

Source: | Human Development Reports

Last edited by MemoryMaker; 11-17-2018 at 01:38 PM..
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