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Old 10-19-2018, 03:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHESTER MANIFOLD View Post
Because Cuba looks like a time travel, just like visiting Rome 60 years after the Ostrogoths sacked and destroyed the city. Eusebio Leal is trying to restore Old Havana, which is a magnificent place, so is Centro Habana. Miramar, former residential place, appalling, la Vibora, appalling, not comparable to anything in America.


Cuba was also a more prosperous Spanish colony and also regained its economic buoyancy after independence and this is reflected in its heritage.


It is only recently that the DR has become economically buoyant so it will be less exciting. Fewer heritage sites.


Parts of Havana are in the process of going through levels of gentrification that make San Francisco look plebian. Of course many of these buildings are passed repair but its their existence that creates the ambience that attracts some people.
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Old 10-19-2018, 03:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
Constanza is another popular destination among Dominicans, especially in the winter months when the air in this valley is crisp and cold.


Question. How efficient is internal transportation within the DR. Its size and climatic variance makes it interesting for those who wish to explore. It has both the highest and lowest points in the Caribbean. A big metro and some isolated coastal and mountainous regions and a huge (by Caribbean standards) lake.
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Old 10-19-2018, 03:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHESTER MANIFOLD View Post
You keep comparing those two countries when they don't have anything in common. Even less with Haiti, Cubans are still horrified by their slave revolt and many in the government fear a large slave revolt in the near future. Not joking.


Well with that silly comment about Obama, no wonder. They seem to be still living back in the 19th C. Carlos Moore has had much to say about this, as has Enrique Patterson.
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Old 10-19-2018, 04:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
. The local element is what’s missing in most Caribbean islands because they don’t have sizable middle/upper middle class and upper class to sustain vacation real estate markets.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/17/r...-republic.html


I suggest you rephrase this to say that with the 2nd largest population in the Caribbean the DR has a bigger pool of potential investors.


DR has a HUGE issue with income inequality as evidenced by the heavy presence of Dominican migrants scattered around most parts of the Caribbean. Yes many doing work as domestics and other occupations that the locals shun.


Its middle class is large because its overall population is large.
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Old 10-19-2018, 08:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
I suggest you rephrase this to say that with the 2nd largest population in the Caribbean the DR has a bigger pool of potential investors.


DR has a HUGE issue with income inequality as evidenced by the heavy presence of Dominican migrants scattered around most parts of the Caribbean. Yes many doing work as domestics and other occupations that the locals shun.


Its middle class is large because its overall population is large.

38% of dominicans are poor or about 3.8 million people
the other six millions are not, thats more people that the whole english speaking caribbean combined.
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Old 10-19-2018, 08:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Ahm...you do know that Havana has a university called the University of Havana that has 24,000 students, right?
what do that even means? No one said cuba dosent have an university, i said university of santo domingo is older as is everything in DR.
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Old 10-20-2018, 05:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Cuba cities look so much cooler/more attractive than Dominican Republic cities. Thoughts?

I've never been to Cuba, but would love to go. I have been to the Dominican Republic though. My thoughts on Santo Domingo was that it is okay....but not particularly attractive/interesting. The Colonial Zone was just okay, in a mediocre kind of way. When I've viewed other cities like Santiago in DR, it looks more car-oriented, less inviting to walk around.

But pretty much everywhere in Cuba looks quite inviting. Not only Havana, but pretty much every city seems to have some character and attractive elements to it. Why do you think that is?

If you disagree with me on that, please give some examples of where and why, as I'd like to see DR a bit differently than that...
Pictures are deceiving, most of Cuba’s historic dwelling have collapsed or about too, unfortunately. There are sections being preserved to make it look good for pictures and tourists. Cuba’s treasure lie in it’s spectacular beaches. Cayo Coco is a gem. Just beautiful. Nevertless, you should go and experience it for yourself.
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Old 10-20-2018, 02:34 PM
 
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Cuba has Colonial and old world Mediterranean architecture that is unique to anywhere else in the world.

https://insightcuba.com/blog/2013/09...in-cuba-havana

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/2012...c-architecture


http://www.cubanocuba.com/the-architecture-of-cuba/

They are still building and repairing things from 50 years ago.

The people are very reliant and resourceful,and no country in the West has aided and helped the developing world more than Cuba, people can say what they want about the economy but many ethnicities have gone for tutleage and training in their universities there.

It still intriguing to tourist despite having a blockade ,people there still tend to be lively from the ones I met in SoFla.

I do need visit sometime soon.

Last edited by PrizeWinner; 10-20-2018 at 02:49 PM..
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Old 10-25-2018, 04:23 AM
 
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Cuba has survived better because being the country with the largest colonial legacy, froze in 1959.
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Old 10-28-2018, 05:21 PM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 13 days ago)
 
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This is typical of small towns and moderately populated rural areas in the DR. There aren´t many 360 degree photos, but this video tour does the place justice.

It is amazing how much has changed. For example, as recent as the 1970´s and 1980´s most houses were of palm wood while today most are of cinderblock. Most streets in small towns were unpaved while now most are paved. Modern basic technology such as televisions, washer machines, etc were very scarce. Usually one or two households would have a TV and all the women from the neighborhood would congregate at that house to watch the novelas from Venezuela or Mexico. Washing clothes was mostly done by hand, either in a nearby river or brook, or the women would go to the nearest river with buckets the filled with water and take back to their homes by balancing the buckets on their head. Then they would use another dry bucket for pouring some of the river water and wash the clothes by hand. Stoves were also a rarity, with the typical Dominican family cooking in pits called fogon, often times in the open air or in a separate small wooden building that was used as “the kitchen”. A significant percentage of homes also had dirt floors. People riding horses and donkeys was a very common sight.

Fast forward to today and very few households still live in those conditions. Now you can get cellphone and internet signals even in the most remote regions out in the middle of nowhere. The DR has to be the country that has changed the most in Latin America during the last 30 years or so.

Anyway, its a very nice tour that also show the typical natural beauty that predominates in the DR, except in the drier/desert areas (these areas have mostly shrubs, cactuses, acacias, and low height trees native to dry climates) and up in the high mountains and the mountain valleys (pine and Spanish moss country).

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