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Old 07-28-2019, 02:45 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 18 days ago)
 
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Museo Fernando Peña Defilló

This museum the works of the Dominican artist Fernando Peña Defilló. The collection is impressive and kept many aspects of the colonial house where it is located. Defilló won many awards for various works. He died in 2016 with 90 years.




Fernando Peña Defilló https://www.metrord.do/do/noticias/2...ominicana.html
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Old 07-28-2019, 03:40 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 18 days ago)
 
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Parque Iberoamericano

This park was completely redone quite a few years ago and every Holiday Season they fill this with lights of different colors and interesting 'casetas' with their own theme. The park has the Cuevas de Santa Ana, which was a cave that the Taino indians held holy. It used to be outside the city, but the urban jungle has grown through the year. There is also Escuela de Bellas Artes and the Conservatorio Nacional de la Música, which is suppose to focus on teaching the fine arts and professional music. There is an amphitheater, a place for the kids, exercise machines in open air and free, bicycle lanes, a fountain, and other stuff.

















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Old 07-28-2019, 07:52 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 18 days ago)
 
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Biggest Burger King in the World at the Time of Opening

For whomever it interests, at the time it was open this was the largest Burger King in the world located on avenida Lincoln. It was inaugurated a few years ago and attached is a Papa John. As can be seen in the image, it has some seating areas on the outside too. The building was designed by a Dominican architect. I think it lost that title, but its still one of the largest of the Miami-based chain.

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Old 07-29-2019, 01:23 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 18 days ago)
 
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Edificio JMMB

The Edificio JMMB is a relatively new office building that catches the attention due to its peculiar design. The building was designed by a Dominican architect firm. The main company in here is a stock brokerage firm, hence the name. JMMB also has offices in Trinidad & Tobago and in Jamaica, though its Dominican operation is the largest by a long shot.







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Old 07-29-2019, 01:38 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 18 days ago)
 
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Museo del Ron y la Caña

A museum with the history of the sugar cane and its most famous derivative, rum. The first sugar cane stalk in America was planted on the island in the early 1500s and brought by a Spaniard from the Canary Islands in Spain. The sugar industry as is known today dates to the end of the 1870s with heavy American involvement, who were the main developers of the industry in the DR. Sugar produced in Dominican plantation has always overwhelmingly been taken to the United States. In the 1500s it was a major exporter to Spain, though the economy wasn't based on that. Afterwards it was a very small and rudimentary industry based on supplying the national market and the sugar mills produced by the Spaniards in the 1500s turning mostly to dust. People in rural areas used to grow their own sugar cane and rudimentary produced their sugar and molasses for their own consumption.

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Old 07-29-2019, 03:57 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 18 days ago)
 
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Polígono Central (Piantini-Naco-Paraíso)

The Polígono Central is basically the center of Santo Domingo, despite the city has several 'centers'. It is composed of the three neighborhoods of Piantini, Naco, and Paraíso. They are bordered on the north by avenida Kennedy, on the east by avenida Ortega y Gasset, on the south by avenida 27 de Febrero, and on the west by avenida Churchill. There are regulations that have been put in place here, for example car shops where mechanics work are banned inside the Polígono Central. Each neighborhood started to developed in the 1970's as mostly single family home areas. When avenida Churchill was built in the second half of the 1970's (the Date Palms were brought from Uruguay by president Balaguer himself), the avenue was basically empty filled with malaise and a rural scene. Some people called it 'la suntuosa' because that's what it looked like, a worthless project to nowhere that nobody used. A person could literally take a nap in the middle of the road where cars run today and not a car would run them over. Today avenida Churchill is one of Santo Domingo's greatest avenue. Its low skyline (mostly defined by the tallest trees) and airy feel was its characteristics. Everything began to change in the 2000s and during the past 10 to 15 years most of the highrises, restaurants, plazas, stores, etc in this area was created. The area went from being a sleepy area to a very active zone of the city basically at the blink of an eye.

It should be realized that the Dominican Republic was always a rich-poor society with no middle class to speak of. During the Trujillo dictatorship a small middle class was created by government employees and during the 1960's a market based middle class has formed. Overall the middle class has grown in most decades (1980's was a decade of waste with a riot in 1984 in Santo Domingo). Today, more than ever, the middle class has not only grown tremendously in Santo Domingo, but also in several cities in the interior, mostly in Cibao cities. The most important in the interior is Santiago de los Caballeros.

Earlier this year the ABC company in Spain held a forum where the 'Economic Miracle of the Dominican Republic' was analyzed. (El Foro ABC América analiza el «milagro económico» de República Dominicana)

The article can be translated -not perfectly- to English here: https://translate.google.com/






















Last edited by AntonioR; 07-29-2019 at 04:21 PM..
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Old 07-29-2019, 08:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
Population Distribution and Density in the Dominican Republic

As can be seen on the map, the population is most concentrated in the Santo Domingo area and in the Cibao Valley. Outside of those two places the population is concentrated in a few places and along the major highways, then it's sparsely populated in much of the rest. There are areas that don't have a person in them. The capital and the Cibao regions collectively is home to slightly less than 80% of the population. With the exception of the eastern region where the population was concentrated around El Seibo and Higüey and now it's concentrated along some cities in the Caribbean coast, other areas have the distribution it always had. What has changed is the density. The rural population is around 20% of the people with, again, the Cibao Valley being the area with the greatest concentration of small and medium size family farms. Despite this, some areas of the north are sparsely populated, which is the case of the Samana Peninsula in the northeast where the province total population represents around 1% of the national population. Less than 40% live in the Santo Domingo region. Its very common to read old descriptions of the island and foreigners saying that from a boat the Dominican coast made it seem the country was wanting of population or deserted compared to other islands and the western part of the same island where the bulk of the population live on the coast. This can also be seen in the food, since seafoods doesn't make much of the diet of most people, contrasting with other islands nearby where seafood is eaten a lot. For people that visit Punta Cana (today over 70% of tourists in the DR go to that region), it's on the eastern tip of the country. Bávaro is slightly north of the tip and the Punta Cana International Airport is slightly south of the tip.


https://economistadominicano.wordpre.../cartografias/


https://www.23andme.com/


https://www.23andme.com/
WOW look at that first photo!
You see how dense Haiti is (even in the mountainous so-called "rural" border areas), compared to the Dominican Republic. Theres bound to be some spill over of that density onto the Dominican side, border tensions and Haitians trying to claim Dominican land. DR definetly needs a huge wall on its border asap.
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Old 07-29-2019, 08:35 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 18 days ago)
 
5,371 posts, read 8,096,037 times
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The worst part is making a tour of the other side and noticing a lot of things, interesting and not so. The two things that jumo is how messed up it is and there are no real prospects as of now for that place. Once that sinks in a huge fear will hit you of everything that you see. I think anyone that wants the best for the people living on Hispaniola will feel a knot on their stomachs when going to that other country. Nothing really prepares for going from DR to Haiti, I can only imagine how much of a shock it a person go from in the morning being in NYC with the world at their feet and in a few hours are in Port-au-Prince. You want to kiss the ground when arriving back at the DR, which is usually to Santiago or Santo Domingo.

It is what it is. This thread is about Santo Domingo and what is there to see and do. Some is interesting to some people, not so much to others. Visiting the city requires someone doing it just to know a place to see and have something to do during their visit. Hopefully a thread like this helps people narrow down what they will see in the days they are in Santo Domingo.
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Old 07-30-2019, 08:37 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 18 days ago)
 
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Parque Juan Pablo Duarte

More of a plaza than a park, there are many benches and in the center is a monument dedicated to Juan Pablo Duarte.





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Old 07-30-2019, 02:17 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 18 days ago)
 
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Ruby Texas

A casual eating place created by some young Dominicans. The food is inspired on Tex-Mex from the United States and its currently an expanding chain in the DR. This is their main location in Santo Domingo.

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