U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-30-2019, 02:28 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 20 days ago)
 
5,393 posts, read 8,104,992 times
Reputation: 4301

Advertisements

Pedrables Parque

A new residential building that seem to attract attention due to its Zeebra-like patterns. For some reason this building reminds me of the old Hilton Havana Hotel in Cuba.



Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-31-2019, 06:38 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 20 days ago)
 
5,393 posts, read 8,104,992 times
Reputation: 4301
Museo de las Telecomunicaciones

Inside this building is a cool museum documenting the history of telecommunications in all its forms. It has a varied and cool lighting, new technology where many exhibitions can be touched, etc. The building itself was built in the XX Century in the Art Deco architectural style. Most building in the Dominican Republic and especially in Santo Domingo that were built in this American architectural style were built in the 1940’s and 1950’s. Santo Domingo has one of the largest and most important Art Deco collection in the world. This style also became popular in other Spanish Caribbean cities, especially San Juan in Puerto Rico and La Habana in Cuba. Miami Beach also has a well known collection of these buildings with many neon lights bringing out some of their most important architectural styles.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2019, 07:09 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 20 days ago)
 
5,393 posts, read 8,104,992 times
Reputation: 4301
Iglesia de Santa Bárbara

This church is in the Santa Bárbara neighborhood next to the walls on the north of Ciudad Colonial. The area is rundown but slated to be upgraded soon, not just the streets bit also the buildings. The church was being restored at the time of the photo. It has interesting architecture inside and out, dating back in o colonial times. The church was also the site where Juan Pablo Duarte was baptized. Nearby is a small street that connects to the port known as La Negreta, a word deriving from negro which means black in Spanish. The base of the Casa del Diablo (Devil’s House) is also visible, dating back to colonial times. This was the first street that Africans brought from the Senegambia region of Northwest Africa saw of the New World in the 1500s. The Africans were taken from the ships in the port up this street and stored at the Casa del Diablo. Across the main street to Santa Bárbara neighborhood was the open air market where the Africans were sold in the 1500s. There is a handsome building that was later built there, but it remains to be seen if it will be destroyed and a recreation of the market would be built there. Maps from the 1500s of Santo Domingo show this very clearly. The walls that protect the city and behind the church and an abandoned fort protects it at its most northern point.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2019, 08:06 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 20 days ago)
 
5,393 posts, read 8,104,992 times
Reputation: 4301
Circumscripción 3 of Santo Domingo

The northeastern and most of the eastern sections of the city, from avenida Máximo Gómez to the Ozama River and north of the Ciudad Colonial to the Isabela River, is an area of mostly lower middle class and poor neighborhoods. Most neighborhoods initially were developed in the Era de Trujillo and after his death swelled with people from interior of the country and the Caribbean. From the decade of the 1990's onward every neighborhood in this area has lost population, a consequence of many families seeing their income or savings grow and moving to more middle class neighborhoods and many emigrating out of the country. There are a few commercial areas for residents and several industrial areas, but very few real attractions to tourists. Many of the parks in this area have been fixed by the municipality with new infrastructure and lighting, places for the kids to play, and sports venues. There are many housing projects built by the government for families that would buy the apartments at a very subsidized rate and often times it was given. Most were built during Joaquín Balaguer's presidencies. In recent years the area has received many Haitians too, one area even known as 'Pequeño Haití' for obvious reason. Chinese immigrants have also open many stores in the area, usually with Chinese letters on their signs or referencing somewhere in China. Santo Domingo's Barrio Chino is in this area, but the Chinese businesses are actually found all over this area. This is also where most of Santo Domingo slums facing the river are found. Today it has gone down to the single digits percentage of people in the whole country that lives in extreme poverty, and now most of the population of the city lives elsewhere in Santo Domingo.


The black line is the average for Latin America of the percentage of the population that lived in crowded and inadequate housing, which includes slum dwellors. Dominican Republic is presented in Spanish as República Dominicana.
https://issuu.com/poderesip/docs/solacc_2012_web/64?ff






The collection of these neighborhoods create to Circumpiscion 3 of Santo Domingo, the only voting section that has seen a reduction of the population every year in the city. http://adn.gob.do/joomlatools-files/...ras%202008.pdf






Sid huge manufacturing plant is actually on the other side of avenida Máximo Gómez, but is an example of large industrial centers found in this area of the city.




Barrio Chino de Santo Domingo has two different Chinese gates, one at the entrance and another at the exit of the main street. The Chinatown was redone a few years ago with stones for the streets, new sidewalks, new statues and light fixtures, even trees native to China lines the main street here. Some small parks and plazas were also redone and have a Chinese theme. A open air event is held here where the Chinese New Year is celebrated and every weekend many Asians from the city, mostly Chinese, hold a open air market in this area where Chinese food and typical artifacts is sold from them, even live seafood. Right now the Dominican Republic has the largest Chinese community in the Caribbean and growing.




Parque Enriquillo. The park honors Cacique Enriquillo, the last Taino indian leader that made a war with the Spaniards setting on the island. He and his men retired to the Bahoruco Mountains and attacked the Spanish forces. Eventually he made the first treaty of peace between an indian tribe and the Europeans, and retreated with his people to the town of Boyá. His story is the center of the plot in the English novel "The Cross and Sword" and "Enriquillo" in Spanish. The park has a bust of him and behind it a structure marking the center.


Paseo Comercial Duarte covers many blocks on avenida Duarte. For many years this was one of the most important shopping streets in the country. In the 1990's this street was also known for having many commercial signs clogging above the avenue. Originally this was a two lane avenue with a median named avenida Trujillo Valdez. Then the street was renamed in honor of Juan Pablo Duarte, made a north-south one way street, the elimination of the median, and many department stores and businesses turn this into a major commercial artery of the city and country.

Last edited by AntonioR; 07-31-2019 at 09:19 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2019, 11:50 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 20 days ago)
 
5,393 posts, read 8,104,992 times
Reputation: 4301
La Libanesa

This is another Dominican chain focusing on dishes from the Middle East, especially from Lebanon. The creators are Dominicans with ties to Lebanon. The Arab community in the DR is overwhelmingly Lebanese and their descendants of the Christian faith. There are many Syrians and Palestinians as well. In general terms, the DR has many immigrants that are easily seen in the cities. Among the poor there is an obvious Haitian immigrant community and in the last decades there are Venezuelans too. Most other immigrants belong from the middle class and up. The main countries they are from are Canada, United States, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Colombia, Brazil, Spain, France, Italy, China, and several islands in the Lesser Antilles. Many come from a few cities or regions in each country such as Miniara in Lebanon, La Habana in Cuba, Guandong in China, or Caracas in Venezuela. There are people from other countries, but these are not thousands of people.




A recent video of a Venezuelan telling more people how to move to the Dominican Republic.


In this video the Venezuelan immigrant show what he can buy at one of the La Sirena stores in Santo Domingo with just 1,000 Dominican pesos (about 20 US dollars).

Last edited by AntonioR; 07-31-2019 at 12:16 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2019, 02:25 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 20 days ago)
 
5,393 posts, read 8,104,992 times
Reputation: 4301
Torre Caney

Torre Caney for many years was the tallest building in the Caribbean, but it was recently surpassed by another building down the road. It still remains as one of the tallest residential buildings in Latin America and its now the second tallest building in the Caribbean. Each floor is a separate apartment which is more like a mansion in their own right. The top has a heliport and there are several services at the bottom plus the lobby. Views of the city, the park, and the Caribbean Sea is a feature of all its residential units. The top floors is a single penthouse.










Torre Caney seen from a drone.


Someone arriving or leaving home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2019, 05:02 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 20 days ago)
 
5,393 posts, read 8,104,992 times
Reputation: 4301
Major Supermarkets in Santo Domingo

Some people decide to stay in an apart-hotel instead of a traditional hotel, it offers apartments and are easier for longer term stays. Many of their guests decide to cook-in instead of going out all the time just to eat. These are the major supermarket companies that someone staying in an apart-hotel in Santo Domingo will do the usual weekly shoppings. Some are international chains while others are present on a national scale and some only in the Santo Domingo area. Some are department stores or hypermarkets with a supermarket attached while others are only supermaket types.


Carrefour


La Sirena


Súper Pola


Plaza Lama


Price Smart


Jumbo


Super Mercados Nacional


Súper Bravo (Keep in mind that the owners to this chain are very religious, that means all their stores are closed on Sunday and they don't sell alcohol except wine brands).


Supermercado Amigo


Super Fresh Market


Unidos


Dragon


La Cadena
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2019, 05:09 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 20 days ago)
 
5,393 posts, read 8,104,992 times
Reputation: 4301
This young American woman moved to Santiago, DR and explains the cost of living. Keep in mind that in general Santiago is cheaper than Santo Domingo. In case anyone is wondering, her family is originally from the New York City area, but her parents now live in Arizona.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2019, 07:10 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 20 days ago)
 
5,393 posts, read 8,104,992 times
Reputation: 4301
Palacio Nacional

The National Palace is where the President of the Dominican Republic has his office. While its traditional that the president lives in the private residence of their choice and there is a large presidential beach mansion in Juan Dolio, Dominican presidents work in this building. It was built in the 1940s by Rafael Leónidas Trujillo and designed by the Italian Guido D'Alessandro, whom afterwards decided to stay in the Dominican Republic and left many descendants. Despite the palace isn't open to the public, with calls and appointments it can be visited. The palace is built in the Italian Renaissance style with some inspiration on the Capitol in Washington DC, United States. The facade has many Corinthian columns, Neoclassical windows, a grand stairway with two lions statues, among other details. The inside is very beautiful with many murals, different designed luxurious rooms including one with various caryatids, and other well appointed areas, even many of the columns is made of marble quarried from Samana. Behind the Palacio Nacional is a chapel built in honor of the saint San Rafael, the private place where the president and his family goes to church. The chapel is smaller, but built in the same style with the palace including its own dome. All plants on the property are native to the island. Around the property is a fancy fence and an elaborate gate with guards, from where many people take photos of the building and of the guards. In the 1970s the palace was used as the Cuban palace with a huge Cuban flag in front in the movie The Godfather.








https://www.flickr.com/photos/presid...57706366600424
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2019, 07:34 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 20 days ago)
 
5,393 posts, read 8,104,992 times
Reputation: 4301
Palacio de Bellas Artes

The Palace of Fine Arts was built by Rafael Leónidas Trujillo. The building's facade has many columns and has an ancient Egyptian kind of look. The inside has many columns in its atrium and there is plenty of marble and other precious stones in its workmanship. The building is much more beautiful on the inside than on the outside, but is hard to miss. The grounds has a fence that surrounds the property and interesting gardens, statues, plazas, etc. In the 1940s there was many Spaniards that left Spain either running away or avoiding the dictatorship of Francisco Franco in Latin America and the Dominican Republic was one of the chosen spots. The Spaniards developed the fine arts in the Dominican Republic, which until then basically didn't exist in the DR. Perhaps the most famous painter of that migration is Vela Zanetti, whose murals grace many parts of the interior of this palace and other grand buildings in Santo Domingo, such as the National Palace and the National Congress buildings, among others. Today it's quite notable the number of Cuban teachers in the fine arts, most are from La Habana.









Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top