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Old 07-13-2019, 07:20 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 16 hours ago)
 
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Parque Mirador del Sur

Unlike most major cities in Latin America, Santo Domingo has large areas of its metro area devoted to parks, including four big ones. In fact, over 25% of the DR is devoted to national parks and Scientific reserves and every year law makers declare one or two more areas as national parks, one of the highest in the Americas. The first national parks were created by Trujillo, then Balaguer continue the practice influenced by his sister. Every administration since then inaugurates several national parks and green spaces during their tenure.

Mirador del Sur Park is the largest park in Santo Domingo. The name correspond that the park sits on a ledge where the Caribbean Sea and much of southwestern Santo Domingo can be seen. It is much longer (very long) on a east-west direction than on the north-south. The parks has many areas where all sorts of sports and exercises can be done. It also has statues (indian, black, mixed, and white people national and international), a lake, two or three restaurants including Guácara Taina which in inside a cave and also becomes a night club. The park also have an avenue that spans its length called Avenida de la Salud. Every morning and evening a lot of people go walking or jogging along this avenue. Some organizations from time to time use the park for events. In the weekends there are many families, lovers, friends, and solo people enjoying different areas of the park, holding a birthday party or simply a cookout which is often called a parrillada. Some sections appear as a forest.

Anacaona 27 and Torre Caney are the tallest and second tallest buildings in Central America and the Caribbean (excepting Panama), and they border the park. There are other architecturally interesting buildings bordering the park that can also be appreciated.

All photos are from Google Street View.













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Old 07-13-2019, 08:55 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 16 hours ago)
 
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Biblioteca Nacional Pedro Henríquez Ureña


Pedro Henríquez Ureña, a prolific Dominican author and investigator in the XX Century.

This is the Pedro Henríquez Ureña National Library. Here are all the historic and current books, magazines, and articles about the Dominican Republic or anything published in any field by a Dominican, including published abroad by a Dominican or descendant of a Dominican, regardless of the language. Many times the person doesn't even know that there is a copy here, but they do have a few people scouring the world for these works. It's important to note that as long that anyone has one Dominican parent, they too inherit Dominican citizenship regardless where they are born. The person does needs to make it known at the nearest Dominican consulate and immediately they are issued a Dominican cédula and a Dominican passport. They are also able to enter the country without limits, vote in Dominican elections even from abroad, and have all the legal rights of any Dominican citizens (legally opening a bank account, entering the country with oneway ticket, no need to pay for the tourists card or apply for any visas, can legally live in the DR, can't be deported from the DR, can't be imposed any sanctions while entering or leaving the DR, can legally work in the DR, work at any level of the government including becoming the President, etc). Dual nationality is recognized with most governments, including the US and Spain. A person isn't allowed to take out any books, magazines, or articles from here.

Recently the DR became the first country to copy the archives from the Archivos General de Indias in Seville, Spain (it has most of the colonial documents of all Spanish American countries) and other archives in that country. The documents all have to do with the DR, are being copied in batches, and will be completely digitized for anyone to use online. The documents span the 300-something years of Spanish rule. However, the original documents of the DR and other former or current Spanish territories around the world will always be in Spain.


Last edited by AntonioR; 07-13-2019 at 09:32 AM..
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Old 07-13-2019, 10:17 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 16 hours ago)
 
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Ciudad Ganadera

Originally this was established in this place when the city ended many kilometers away, but the city grew and now the Ciudad Ganadera is inside the city by a long shot. In this place many Dominicans do competitions of their horses, cattle, etc. They also do competitions with other Spanish American countries. Sometimes the international competition is held here and at other times in other Spanish countries. In many areas of the US, mostly zones that used to be Spanish, they have these competition too. In the Caribbean I understand this is still done in Cuba and in Puerto Rico. This is a tradition in the DR. In fact, this was the first place in all of the Americas where horses, cows, etc were introduced in the early 1500. It used to be done in the west when it was part of the Spanish territory for 200 years more or less, but the practice stop over there when the French began to establish that place. There cattle of all types have always had a shortage. The population there is mostly lactose intolerance inherited from their ancestors, which doesn't help and probably explains why they hardly have sweets from milk. This is the case in most of the Caribbean except in a handful of places where it is widespread, the DR among them. The Dominicans eat this stuff by the millions each year in part because the country produce it, but also because most of the population isn't lactose intolerant. Many milk based sweets are national icons, but the same is true of all Spanish American countries. For example, they all have dulce de leche bars and they all think its a national invention when in reality it came from Spain, both the cattle and the dulce de leche. lol

They also do other competitions here, such as the agricultural competition or the competition of exotic cars, among other things.

The photos are from Google Street View.






Last edited by AntonioR; 07-13-2019 at 10:40 AM..
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Old 07-13-2019, 01:01 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 16 hours ago)
 
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Centro de los Héroes

This complex was developed for the 1955 Feria de la Paz y Confraternidad del Mundo Libre and Angelita Trujillo was coronated as a princes with crown and all (she now lives in Miami, Fl and her book is banned in the DR; one of her sons is controversially running for the presidency in the DR - at one point he was kicked out of the National Congress building). It was built by Trujillo in what then was in the middle of nowhere. This complex did won some international architectural prizes for being among the most modern area ever developed in the Americas.

Today the area is known as Centro de los Héroes (Heroes Center), commemorating many of the people that fought against Trujillo's dictatorship. Some of the original buildings were knocked down and replaced with new buildings. The area also has a large fountain that sometimes is on and other times it isn't. Line 1 of Santo Domingo's Metro also ends here with a museum on a part of its station dedicated to the fallen victims of the 14 de Junio invasion from Cuba. According to Trujillo, they were communists. Those that invaded through Constanza were mostly burn alive on the spot and those that invaded from the Estero Hondo y Maimon bay near Puerto Plata were hunted down and killed. Some family members recognize that they were communists while others say they wanted to liberate the Dominican people.


Santo Domingo's City Hall with its beautiful but simple tower. The building is built in marble and has the city's coat of arm above the main entrance. Santo Domingo received the most impressive coat of arm in the hemisphere by the Spanish King in the 1500. It was one of the first city's in this hemisphere to receive such a thing. The coat of arm was redesigned, keeping all the original elements but making it smaller.


To the left is the Suprema Corte de Justicia or the Supreme Court. Originally there was another building there, but about a couple of decades ago this new building was built there. The building was designed by a Dominican architect. Its facade is the most interesting aspect outside, while inside it has a peculiar staircase.


The Congreso Nacional. The Senate and thecChamber of Deputies held their sessions here (on the ends of the building).


Entrance/exit to the Santo Domingo Metro. On the other side of the boulevard is another one like this.


One of the nice buildings in this area.


Monument built by Trujillo. Some years ago it even had the 5 stars that symbolizes the dictatorship on the triangle thing. At the bottom is an earth, a fountain, and in front a statue. This photo was taken from Autopista 30 de Mayo, which symbolizes May 30, 1961 when the dictator was gunned down on this road. It was sort of a Julius Caesar and Brutus thing because his killers were some of his closest friends.


The fountain that sometimes is on and sometimes it isn't. It wasn't in at the time of the photos.


Looking north on the main boulevard that cuts the area in half.


Interview of General Antonio Imbert Barrera (he died very recently), one of the guys that killed the dictator. He married a Cuban woman that lives in Santo Domingo and is treated with privileges, including getting discounts simply for being who she is.


This was Angelita Trujillo book put in circulation simultaneously in Miami and in Santo Domingo. Angelita was in Miami to sign her book and answer questions. This is how it went down in Santo Domingo. Her book was banned in the DR a few days after this. Descendants of people the dictator killed storm into the place.


This is Angelita Trujillo, the daughter of the dictator and who lives in Miami, FL, United States.

Last edited by AntonioR; 07-13-2019 at 01:24 PM..
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Old 07-13-2019, 03:28 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 16 hours ago)
 
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Adrian Tropical

This chain of restaurants was started by a poor Dominican guy who with hard work and dedication made his business flourish. He named it after his son. Unfortunately, not too long ago one of his sons killed himself in a single person vehicular accident on Avenida Anacaona of this city. Several restaurants are scattered around the city, but the malecón version has a wonderful look of the Caribbean Sea. The food is usually typical Dominican fare.

Photo is of Google Street View.




The founder of Adrian Tropical (brown pants). He is also holding his head in the video photo.


Adrian Tropical Malecón
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Old 07-13-2019, 05:02 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 16 hours ago)
 
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Museo de la Porcelana

This museum is in a building with a mudejar architectural style which was introduced in Spain by the Moorish and then the Spaniards brought it to Spanish America. It contains artifacts of all types made from porcelain, including some of which are very historic. Some have been rescued from Spanish galeons that were sunk in Dominican waters by pirates and hurricanes. This museum is on Calle José Reyes.

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Old 07-14-2019, 06:40 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 16 hours ago)
 
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Plazoleta de María de Toledo

María de Toledo was the wife of Diego Colón, Christopher Columbus’ son, and niece to Chales V in Europe. She lived with her husband in a palace nearby. She and some of her female friends used to stroll the street by the river, due to that it was named as The Ladies Street (Calle Las Damas). The plazoleta connects that street with Calle Isabel La Católica. The square also has a fountain by her name that is one of the first fountains in America. There is a statue of María de Toledo and some days some guys sell stuff on the plazoleta. When Christopher Columbus died in Valladolid, Spain she made sure that his will was respected, especially the part he wrote that his body should be buried in Santo Domingo. Not only was the city named in honor of his father, but it was founded by his brother Bartholomew. She was in the caravel where the bodies of Christopher and Diego was translated from Spain to Santo Domingo.

Photos are from Google Street View.












Last edited by AntonioR; 07-14-2019 at 06:48 AM..
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Old 07-14-2019, 07:13 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 16 hours ago)
 
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Museo Palacio Virreinal de Diego Colón, Plaza de España, & La Puerta de Diego Colón

The Viceroyal Palace of Diego Columbus Museum, the son of Christopher Columbus, is where was his home. The name of the building is Alcazar de Diego Colón. From here the first viceroy of America ruled until the rest of the continent was broken up. He lived with his wife María de Toledo, niece of Charles V. Hernán Cortés was inspired by this palace that the influence can be seen in the palace he built in Cuernavaca, México. In 1586 the English pirate Sir Francis Drake enter this palace and among the things he saw was a mural with a guy holding up a world and on top it said "The World is Not Enough". He took that as a message from the King of Spain and was filled with rage because of it. A small part of the palace had to be rebuilt from the same quarry and stone that was used to build the original. Its walls are made of the Coralina stone. In front is Plaza de España. At one side it has a statue of Nicolás de Ovando while on the other side it explains very briefly the coat of arms and the founding of Santo Domingo. Directly across from the palace are Las Atarazanas, a collection of colonial buildings that have several restaurants that in the evenings are filled with people eating and enjoying the sights. Part of their tables spill into the plaza. Nearby behind the palace is La Puerta de Diego Colón, one of the original doors in the wall that surrounds much of the Ciudad Colonial. Above it are five coats of arms representing the Hapsburg royal family, the Spanish Empire, the Isla de La Española, the Ciudad de Santo Domingo, and something else.


Alcazar de Diego Colon


Plaza de España and the statue to Nicolás de Ovando.


Explanation of the founding of Santo Domingo and the start to Calle Las Damas.


Puerta de Diego Colón
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Old 07-14-2019, 01:14 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 16 hours ago)
 
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Virgin of Altagracia (Highest Grace) and Virgin of Las Mercedes (Mercy)

These are two of the most important holidays of the Dominican Republic.

One is on the 21 of January and commemorates the Virgin of Altagracia. Dominicans celebrates it on the 21 of January commemorating the battle against the French near the town of La Limonada, now on the north of Haiti, in the 1690s. Dominican soldiers first held a prayer to this virgin and won the battle. Dominicans prayed to the virgin in every battle since and always won, regardless if they were outnumbered and worst equipped than the invading aggressor. As a result, the Virgin of La Altagracia became the Protector of the Dominican People. The main shrine is in Salvaleón de Higüey. Also many cars, public and private, will have a picture of the Virgin of La Altagracia attached to the lower right of the windshield. The Catholic Church has a different day to commemorate this virgin.

The other is the Virgin of Las Mercedes with its main shrine on top of the Santo Cerro (Holy Hill, named like that by Christopher Columbus) near Concepción de La Vega. This is the oldest in America devoted to a virgin starting as early as the 1490s. This became the Matrona of the Dominican Republic and is celebrated in September. This virgin shouldn't be confused with the Virgin of La Antigua (or Lantigua) which is in the main shrine of La Vega and was brought by Christopher Columbus.

The DR is the only country in the Americas that the Catholic church recognizes two virgins for, the protector and the matrona.

All photos are from Google Street View.


This is the church dedicated to the Virgin of Altagracia in Santo Domingo.


This is the main shrine Basilica de Nuestra Señora de la Altagracia in Salvaleón de Higüey. This place gets filled with people that visit from all over the country and even from other parts of the Caribbean every 21 of January. The top of the church is the bell tower which looks like two hands on prayer. All around is an immense forest of Royal Palm trees. The colonial church is nearby. Despite this is one of the first towns founded by the Spanish in the hemisphere, only the church (San Dionisio) and the city's coat of arm is the same from colonial times.


This is the church dedicated to the Virgin of Las Mercedes in Santo Domingo. This is the second or third church ever built in the Americas. The French put canons on its roof and fired to outside the city walls during the siege Dessalines had on the city for a whole month in 1805.


The inside of the main sanctuary of the Virgin of Las Mercedes in the Santo Cerro (Holy Hill) outside of La Vega. This shouldn't be confused with the church in Santo Domingo. Christopher Columbus made a cross from a Nispero tree and planted here. He gave the credits to the Virgin of Las Mercedes and ever since this virgin has been revered here.


The stunning view of La Vega Real in the back of the sanctuary in the Santo Cerro. It can't be seen in the photo, but the whole valley seen from the hill is covered in millions of Royal Palm trees. Faraway can be seen the Northern Mountain Range (Septentrional), it was also known as Monte Cristi Mountain Range.


Short video of the Museo de La Altagracia on the premises of Basilica de La Altagracia in Higüey.

Last edited by AntonioR; 07-14-2019 at 01:39 PM..
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Old 07-14-2019, 03:29 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 16 hours ago)
 
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Playa Güibia

Playa Güibia is on the malecón, in fact next to Adrian Tropical. The small beach has been there forever, but a few years ago they improved the beach and added a few stuff between the avenue and the beach itself. The beach is nothing to write home about and quite small. Dominican families, lovers, and single people do go to the place, especially in the evenings and on the weekends. There are many things for kids to ride on, volleyball nets, etc. A small place does sells drinks and food that everyone eats sitting in the park area. It also has some peculiarly looking benched, especially by the sidewalk. The Caribbean Sea looks inviting unless it's rainy season, then the waters in front of the city look brown due to all the sediment dumped by the Ozama River. I have seen people do water surfing, but that isn't the place to take a bath. There are also some dangerous sea creatures in front of the city, such as sharks. Much of the city's coast is coral rock not sandy and the sea crashes unto it and in many places the water creates a mist that last a few seconds, especially when the tide is growing. If you get caught in a current and it slams you against the city's coastline, you can kiss your life good bye. Plus, there are nicer and safer beaches to the east of the city.

The photos are from Google Street View.



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