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Old 07-16-2019, 12:39 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 5 days ago)
 
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Downtown Center

The complex is relatively new. The building has offices and at the bottom is a shopping center. The most distinguishing aspect is the giant screen that looks to the corner. For the record, the city no longer has a true downtown. Many areas have high business/eating/entertainment activities. This has become more of a policentric city.





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Old 07-16-2019, 05:50 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 5 days ago)
 
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Calle El Conde de Peñalva y Bracamonte

The full name of the street is calle El Conde de Peñalva y Bracamonte, but people call it calle El Conde. He was a Spaniard that lived in the city during colonial times and was granted the royal title of Conde de Peñalva y Bracamonte, plus also a governor of the island. The street is pedestrian in its entirety and covers the entire length of the Ciudad Colonial. It starts across the street from Puerta del Conde, the main entrance to the colonial city, and reaches the Ozama River. On one end of the street is a statue of General Francisco Alberto Caamaño Deñó, a Dominican that played an important role in the Civil War of 1965. On the other side is a bust of the head of Bartholomew Columbus, founder of the city and brother of Christopher Columbus. The street has many shops, restaurants, art galleries, ice cream shops, and other businesses. At certain intervals it explains some of the history of the street or of nearby buildings, as well as a map of the area. There are everything in terms of buildings, from the oldest city hall of the New World and Spanish Colonial architecture to examples of Beaux Arts and Art Deco, even modern architectural buildings. Five centuries resumed in one street. The street is slated to be intervened and upgraded, including the facade of the buildings.

Photos are from Google Street View.















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Old 07-16-2019, 08:25 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 5 days ago)
 
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Museo de la villa de Santo Domingo

This museum marks the history of the city. It also includes a three dimensional map of Santo Domingo at its height in colonial times. The city was never more powerful and richer than that time. The building itself is the first city hall created in the New World. The facade and the bell tower was created in the beginning decades of the XX Century. It is one of the most beautiful buildings in the city and a landmark of the colonial part. Sometimes people are allowed in the tower and see the city from there.

Photos are from Google Street View.



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Old 07-17-2019, 07:02 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 5 days ago)
 
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Casa del Cordón

One of the oldest houses in this hemisphere, its name is due to the rope that is etch on the rocks over the main entrance. Christopher Columbus stay here a few times, and his son Diego Columbus and wife María de Toledo lived here while their palace was being constructed. Today it's a bank branch that keeps the 1500s house in good shape. Next to this house is the Dominican-German Cultural Center, hence the flags of the Dominican Republic and of Germany flying from its facade.

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Old 07-17-2019, 07:57 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 5 days ago)
 
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Panteón Nacional

The National Pantheon is the resting place of most of the important people in Dominican history. An eternal flame is on all the time for the people whose body was never found or fully destroyed by the enemies, and the people who have no name in the history but gave their lives for the independence of the Dominican people.

There is a discussion in Dominican society whether Pedro Santana should be in the pantheon. His family was dedicated to ranching in the then Dominican town of Concepción de Hincha or simply Hincha in the Guava Valley. Due to constant Haitian incursions during the revolution, the theft of many of his cattle, the war that broke out between the French and their former slaves very nearby; the family decided to leave the border region for good. They move near to El Seibo on the other side of the country and continue to devote to ranching activities. Pedro Santana would be called upon in the multiple Haitian invasions of the Dominican Republic to repel the armed army invading from the west. Pedro Santana always mustered an army of men and charged at the invading army, always winning despite his men were always outnumbered, badly dressed, and badly armed. He is an important reason for the existence of the Dominican Republic and saving the lives of the Dominican people given that at that time the plan of the Haitian government was to take over the DR and then physically exterminate the Dominican people wherever they were found. His remains are still in the National Pantheon.

Another Dominican is also buried in the place, which is José Núñez de Cáceres. He declared the independence of the Dominican people from Spain at the end of 1821 and a couple of months later was the Haitian invasion by Jean Pierre Boyer. They waited for the much stronger Spanish army to leave before attempting their invasion. Boyer claim that his arrival was peaceful, but he felt the need to be followed by an army of thousands of soldiers to a country that still needed to organize its own army, money, everything. Through the years there were many revolts from the Dominican people, but most of their leaders were captured and shot to death by the Haitian government. Before leaving the country a few days later, Núñez de Cáceres gave a long speech about how the Haitians will never dominate the Dominican people, who will always fight for their separation. The fundamental values of the Dominican people is diametrically different from those of the Haitians. To this day his words has been true. Originally he moved to Caracas, Venezuela. His anger with Simón Bolivar caused him to later move to Bogotá, Colombia. Finally he moved to Tamaulipas, México where he lived a successful life. He was buried in the Tamaulipas cemetery and his remains were sent to Santo Domingo in the 20th Century. There is a plaque commemorating him in the cemetery at Tamaulipas, México.

Lastly, the only foreigner to be buried here is Eugenio María de Hostos. He was a Puerto Rican, highly influential in the education of the country. He asked to be buried in Santo Domingo while Puerto Rico continues to be a colony.

The building itself was the first Jesuit church in the Western Hemisphere. They were later expelled from the Spanish Empire and the building has been dedicated to several things through the centuries, including a theater. It became the National Pantheon in the 20th Century. Above the main entrance is the coat of arms of the Dominican Republic. Inside is an eternal flame with a red carpet leading to it, a painting in the roof above the altar which is often referred to as the New World's Sistine Chapel, the altar of the Jesuits, and the remains on both sides of the altar and on the edges of the building. Lastly, there is a chandelier hanging from the roof that was given to dictator Trujillo as a gift from the Spanish dictator Francisco Franco, who was also the Godfather of Angelita Trujillo's baptism.

The photos are from Google Street View.










Last edited by AntonioR; 07-17-2019 at 08:20 AM..
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Old 07-17-2019, 01:30 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 5 days ago)
 
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Casa Sacramento

This is the seat of the Archdiosis of Santo Domingo. It is the oldest archdiosis in the Americas initially encompassing all the lands in America added to Spain. It also used to have for centuries under its tutelage the Diosis of Concepción in La Vega, DR and the Diosis of Puerto Rico. Today it covers large part of the island of Hispaniola. The Archbishop lives here and responds for the Catholic Church in the Dominican Republic. Underneath the building is a tunnel built in the 1500 that connects with the Oldest Church in The New World, where the Archbishop gives his mass. The building isn’t open to the public, but it’s visible from the center of colonial Santo Domingo.

The Catholic Church is the official religion of the Dominican Republic, although there is freedom of religion. It play an important role in the independence of the Dominican people. The Archbishop is invited to offer his opinion of various political matters. The president and important ministers of the government attend mass at the Oldest Cathedral of the New World by the Archbishop of Santo Domingo on important days of the year. Every inauguration from the president (and many private ones too) includes a small Catholic ceremony by an Archbishop appointed priest of the works. Most official holidays are Catholic ones with most businesses, schools, etc being closed for the day (Holy Week, Virgin of Altagracia Day, Chorpus Christi Day, Virgin of Mercy Day, etc). In the president’s office at the National Palace is a Christian cross, a painting of the Virgin of Altagracia, and even the president and his family private chapel. Government institutions, such as the Supreme Court, have a Christian cross with Christ where everyone can see it. In the Supreme Court is in the middle of the main desk where the judges sit, visible to all including television channels.

The Catholic Church used to be much more present. Before just walking in front of a church meant that a person would make the sign of the cross, women put a black see through mantel over their hair and sometimes the face when they were attending mass, a small cross was placed wherever a new building was built, etc. Today those things is no longer required. Kids still ask for the blessings of their parents, uncles, godparents, etc. It is called “besar la mano” in which a kid or teenager would say “bendición ______” (blessings to _______) and the person would respond “Dios te bendiga” (God blesses you). Not doing that in many families means the kid gets a scolding. This started with Catholic monks that whenever anyone saw them, as they pass in front of them the person would kneel down and say “bendición _______” while kissing the monks’ top of the hand and the monk would respond “Dios te bendiga”. Kneeling down and asking from the monks’ blessings is no longer down. However, kids do ask for the blessings of grown ups, usually parents, uncles and aunts, especially grandparents, and godparents.


Last edited by AntonioR; 07-17-2019 at 02:15 PM..
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Old 07-17-2019, 03:48 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 5 days ago)
 
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Museo de Larimar

The Larimar Museum is rather small and show the process that this stone goes through to become various types of jewelry. The bluish stone is unique and is mined in one mountain on the province of Barahona, the only place in the world where this is found. Many jewelry incorporating the semi-precious stone is also for sale. Larimar is officially the stone that represent the Dominican Republic.

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Old 07-17-2019, 04:33 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 5 days ago)
 
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Estadio Quisqueya

Quisqueya is another name for the Dominican Republic and that is the name of the baseball stadium. Originally it was called Estadio Trujillo because he built it, but after his death the stadium changed to the current name. It is home to two teams that represents the capital, Leones de Escogido and Tigres de Licey. When they play against the Águilas Cibaeñas from Santiago, the rivalry that exist with that city increases the excitement. The DR has 6 professional teams scattered through the country, but Santo Domingo is the only city with 2 teams. Unlike US professional baseball games, Dominican baseball games includes women in very suggestive clothing and advertisement dancing during the brakes. Alcohol is also permitted on the premise and the games are usually very lively with music and such than in the USA. The Dominican Baseball League play its games from October to December, then the winning team represents the DR in the Caribbean Series include countries like Puerto Rico, Cuba, Mexico among others. Sometimes the Caribbean Series is played in one of the Dominican stadiums and other years its played in one of the participating countries. People usually travel to see the Caribbean Series. Some professional players from the USA, Japan, Mexico, etc play for certain Dominican teams as well.

Dominican baseball games are aired in cable television where Dominican channels are included. ESPN en español also airs Dominican games.

Photos are from Google Street View.









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Old 07-17-2019, 05:36 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 5 days ago)
 
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Monumento a la caída de Trujillo

A monument in the exact spot where the dictator Trujillo was ambushed and shot to death. This happened on the night of May 30, 1961. At that time the area was rural and the city ended quite a few kilometers from there. The dictator was going to visit his mistress outside of San Cristobal. It was him and the driver in the car. At the time of his death he was one of the top 5 richest people in the world.





An old Merengue where Trujillo's death is the theme. The dictator is referred to as "El Chivo" (The Goat).
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Old 07-17-2019, 06:44 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 5 days ago)
 
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Palacio de Borgella

The building itself was a house built by Diego de Herrera in colonial times, but the arches and balcony was built by General Geremy Borgella, the Haitian governor during the Haitian Occupation (1822 to 1844). He was originally a mulatto from the Haitian town of Jeremie and play a role in liberating his country from the French, though he criticized Jean Jacques Dessalines for ordering the general massacre of the French in 1804. In Santo Domingo he was station to govern the Ozama department (the Spanish part was divided in two departments, Ozama was the south and the Cibao was the north). He kept the peace in Santo Domingo, where the people wanted to revolt to the Haitian soldiery stationed at all the towns in the eastern side.

There was also a bitter rivalry between the Haitian soldiery and the Catholic Church. Archbishop Valera simply refused to extend his influence over the Haitian population and publicly denounced the Haitian Invasion and supported the Dominicans. Eventually the Haitian government forced him to leave the island and decided to move to Cuba.

The palace became where congress would meet and the president would stand in the second balcony and address the crowd. In 1998 Hurricane Georges destroyed the central part of the balcony and arches, which had to be rebuilt. Palace of Borgella is one of the few buildings in the DR that is named after a Haitian. Few Haitians that were stationed in the various towns of the modern DR treated the population nicely. Borgella in Santo Domingo and Lebrun in La Vega, among a few others, were among these who treated the population well. Lebrun even buried his heart in the main square of La Vega.

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