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Old 11-07-2018, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Formerly NYC by week; ATL by weekend...now Rio bi annually and ATL bi annually
1,208 posts, read 1,595,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrizeWinner View Post
Dominicans claim Washington Heights as Harlem,I've I thought the Heights was just that?
And many Latinos in America including Mexican say the word n!kk@ , its just a simple trend nothing to do with identity.



Cape Verdians have always claimed their Black/African ancestry,the mulatto population although is big is still not the majority there.
Wash Heights is still considered Harlem. Just as Hamilton Heights is, Morning Side, etc. Sure it has something to do with identity...the Boriquas and Dominicans whom we are speaking of understan its context and that where they are located they look just like the wide spectrum of american blacks. I spent tons of time in SoCal as a young man and its not a common term with urban Mexicans like cholos. The trend of urban people, including whites using it is not that old. In my response to the other gentleman who said that if Dominicans used that word it would be an issue, I appropriately corrected him. So what are you debating exactly? Do you deny they use it in and amongst their black friends and family?

Im in Brazil, and while they are big fans of hip hop its not a widely common word here. So no, its not quite a "trend" as you try to imply. To further support the fact it does have more to do with identity, the black carioca rappers here are the ones that if you hear the word used, would be the ones to use it. Why, because they identify with the relation they have with blacks elsewhere and understand the context of that word when used by Branco Brazilians.....


Cape Verdians were notorious for denying that they were descended from blacks and Im not talking about the openly mixed...what is referred to as "colored" demographic. They could be dark as chocolate and say that. I have some CV ancestry that came over to the states in the 40s. Heard first hand from one of my great grand fathers.

He said his father claimed he was Portuguese...

Last edited by SLIMMACKEY; 11-07-2018 at 07:38 AM..
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Old 11-07-2018, 09:37 AM
 
747 posts, read 393,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
"Having the foot in the kitchen" lol. Is that a Brazilian saying? - I like it.

That saying goes well with the point you're putting across.
Yes. means having some racial admixture, even if it is not visible.
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Old 11-07-2018, 10:09 AM
 
747 posts, read 393,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
Wash Heights is still considered Harlem. Just as Hamilton Heights is, Morning Side, etc. Sure it has something to do with identity...the Boriquas and Dominicans whom we are speaking of understan its context and that where they are located they look just like the wide spectrum of american blacks. I spent tons of time in SoCal as a young man and its not a common term with urban Mexicans like cholos. The trend of urban people, including whites using it is not that old. In my response to the other gentleman who said that if Dominicans used that word it would be an issue, I appropriately corrected him. So what are you debating exactly? Do you deny they use it in and amongst their black friends and family?

Im in Brazil, and while they are big fans of hip hop its not a widely common word here. So no, its not quite a "trend" as you try to imply. To further support the fact it does have more to do with identity, the black carioca rappers here are the ones that if you hear the word used, would be the ones to use it. Why, because they identify with the relation they have with blacks elsewhere and understand the context of that word when used by Branco Brazilians.....


Cape Verdians were notorious for denying that they were descended from blacks and Im not talking about the openly mixed...what is referred to as "colored" demographic. They could be dark as chocolate and say that. I have some CV ancestry that came over to the states in the 40s. Heard first hand from one of my great grand fathers.

He said his father claimed he was Portuguese
...
Hum… But he was really a portugueseman!! Because Cape Verde became independent from Portugal only in 1975 probably he was talking about his nationality, not race!!

You have to remember that Cape Verde was a desert island, like its neighborn actually still Portuguese islands the Azores or the Madeira Island… The difference is that Portuguese used slaves from Africa as workforce there. so its history and mindset is similar our mindset in the Americas. Cape verdean are much more portuguese in culture than african…

They are like black US americans or black brazilians… They are not like African tribes colonized by europeans, they are mixed of many african tribes plus having some portuguese in them, and they speak only portuguese and criolle portuguese (similar what happen in the french and english caribbe)

I met many cape verdean in the college here in Brazil.
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Old 11-07-2018, 10:15 AM
 
301 posts, read 187,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
Wash Heights is still considered Harlem. Just as Hamilton Heights is, Morning Side, etc. Sure it has something to do with identity...the Boriquas and Dominicans whom we are speaking of understan its context and that where they are located they look just like the wide spectrum of american blacks. I spent tons of time in SoCal as a young man and its not a common term with urban Mexicans like cholos. The trend of urban people, including whites using it is not that old. In my response to the other gentleman who said that if Dominicans used that word it would be an issue, I appropriately corrected him. So what are you debating exactly? Do you deny they use it in and amongst their black friends and family?

Im in Brazil, and while they are big fans of hip hop its not a widely common word here. So no, its not quite a "trend" as you try to imply. To further support the fact it does have more to do with identity, the black carioca rappers here are the ones that if you hear the word used, would be the ones to use it. Why, because they identify with the relation they have with blacks elsewhere and understand the context of that word when used by Branco Brazilians.....


Cape Verdians were notorious for denying that they were descended from blacks and Im not talking about the openly mixed...what is referred to as "colored" demographic. They could be dark as chocolate and say that. I have some CV ancestry that came over to the states in the 40s. Heard first hand from one of my great grand fathers.

He said his father claimed he was Portuguese...
I know I was going to get a crackpot response.

Dominicans from Washington Heights really don't claim Harlem ,I've spent enough time in NYC around Dominicans to know.

N!kk@ is not as common as a term among So Cal cholos but they do use it, not to mention Chicanos from NorCal in Texas and Chicago area.I am not one of these cats that takes issue to it all the time but I can see why some blacks get mad at it.


Of course n!kka is not going to be common in Brazil, duh, they speak Portuguese. N!kk@ as a term of endearment is really a black American thing that has been exported to some countries.

Cape Verdians I know tend to congregate around other Africans and do share many customs with them.The thing is among some Africans since they are mixed they are considered ''white'',doesn't mean they deny it.
This is why many black people around the world say African Americans push a twisted version of American racism.
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Old 11-07-2018, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Formerly NYC by week; ATL by weekend...now Rio bi annually and ATL bi annually
1,208 posts, read 1,595,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EVANGELISTTI View Post
Yes. means having some racial admixture, even if it is not visible.
Which half of the Brazilian population has......
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Old 11-07-2018, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Formerly NYC by week; ATL by weekend...now Rio bi annually and ATL bi annually
1,208 posts, read 1,595,779 times
Reputation: 706
Quote:
Originally Posted by EVANGELISTTI View Post
Hum… But he was really a portugueseman!! Because Cape Verde became independent from Portugal only in 1975 probably he was talking about his nationality, not race!!

You have to remember that Cape Verde was a desert island, like its neighborn actually still Portuguese islands the Azores or the Madeira Island… The difference is that Portuguese used slaves from Africa as workforce there. so its history and mindset is similar our mindset in the Americas. Cape verdean are much more portuguese in culture than african…

They are like black US americans or black brazilians… They are not like African tribes colonized by europeans, they are mixed of many african tribes plus having some portuguese in them, and they speak only portuguese and criolle portuguese (similar what happen in the french and english caribbe)

I met many cape verdean in the college here in Brazil.
Portuguese is not a culture. Cariocas do not claim to be "portugesemen" as you just tried to imply a Cape Verdian would claim. They are Brazilians born and raised in Brazil.

Cape Verdians are just that natives of whatever descent from Cape Verde....lmao

Who stated that Cape Verdians are pure africans?? I believe I have stated in multiple posts refuting the whole Pure African vs colonizeed African comparisons by you and a couple others...specifically when trying to compare Haitians to pure Africans, which they are not.

So what are you trying to refute? Because now you are talking in circles meu amigo.....
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Old 11-07-2018, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Formerly NYC by week; ATL by weekend...now Rio bi annually and ATL bi annually
1,208 posts, read 1,595,779 times
Reputation: 706
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrizeWinner View Post
I know I was going to get a crackpot response.

Dominicans from Washington Heights really don't claim Harlem ,I've spent enough time in NYC around Dominicans to know.

N!kk@ is not as common as a term among So Cal cholos but they do use it, not to mention Chicanos from NorCal in Texas and Chicago area.I am not one of these cats that takes issue to it all the time but I can see why some blacks get mad at it.


Of course n!kka is not going to be common in Brazil, duh, they speak Portuguese. N!kk@ as a term of endearment is really a black American thing that has been exported to some countries.

Cape Verdians I know tend to congregate around other Africans and do share many customs with them.The thing is among some Africans since they are mixed they are considered ''white'',doesn't mean they deny it.
This is why many black people around the world say African Americans push a twisted version of American racism.
I split my time between Rio and Harlem.....where did you stay? Cause my daughters mother, born in Santiago, raised in Manhattan sand every other Dominican I know absolutely will tell you Wash Heights is an extension of Harlem....just concede that your point is wrong.

Crackpot statement...lmao...the words of a man who cannot support his argument and is mad when someone who refutes his statements does so in fact....so lets talk...

South Texas Mexican use the word just as much as blacks...why? they grew up with blacks....from Brownswille, to Corpus Cristi, to Houston....man Im verywell traveled so you should not make claims that are false...I will not comment on something I do not have intimate knowledge of....you should do the same sir...


Que amigo? Do you deny they use the term in Brazilian Hip Hop and Baile Funk? I mean you have an illiterate way of AGREEING with someone whom you really want to disagre with. I made the point that in everyday convo Brazilians do not use the term with each other but it is used in rap here...didnt i?? I believe I did.....do you listen to Brazilian Hip hop? Old and new? Do you know what they talk about? How they talk? I mean if you want to debate any of my statments then lets do it, one by one......

And alas....you TRY to cherry pick to refute my facts but please stop...all Cabo Verdians are not mixed...and I specifically stated that my Great grandfather was dark as chocolate and considered himself white until he moved to New Orleans....he was in denial. He said it.....
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Old 11-07-2018, 12:10 PM
 
747 posts, read 393,672 times
Reputation: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
Portuguese is not a culture. Cariocas do not claim to be "portugesemen" as you just tried to imply a Cape Verdian would claim. They are Brazilians born and raised in Brazil.

Cape Verdians are just that natives of whatever descent from Cape Verde....lmao

Who stated that Cape Verdians are pure africans?? I believe I have stated in multiple posts refuting the whole Pure African vs colonizeed African comparisons by you and a couple others...specifically when trying to compare Haitians to pure Africans, which they are not.

So what are you trying to refute? Because now you are talking in circles meu amigo.....
There is Cape Verdeans only after 1975. Before that they were portuguese, they hold portuguese passport, your grandfather immigrated into US as a portuguese man. Did you get the point?
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Old 11-07-2018, 12:51 PM
 
5,495 posts, read 8,159,843 times
Reputation: 4317
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrizeWinner View Post
I know I was going to get a crackpot response.
Sometimes I wonder why some of you keep debating with him. As soon that I noticed how quickly he misrepresented what I said (as if this debate is taking place in person and not in written form where anyone can go to the original posts and see what anyone actually said), I cut short my debates with him. No need to debate with someone that is comfortable exaggerating or misrepresenting others opinions. The line between that and outright lying is very thin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PrizeWinner
Dominicans from Washington Heights really don't claim Harlem ,I've spent enough time in NYC around Dominicans to know.
This is obvious to anyone that accepts reality as it is. Dominicans see themselves as a separate cultural group from anyone else for the sole reason that they are a different cultural group with a different history and a different outlook in life. The other groups that are very similar to Dominicans are latino groups such as Puerto Ricans, Venezuelans, and Panamanians; and most of that is due to the Spanish culture with strong African and important indigenous influences, in that order of importance, that makes up those cultures.

In maps of NYC that show the city’s ethnic demographic grouped in four groups (white=green , Asian=red, latinos=orange, and others=purple) it is very clear where Washington Heights end and Harlem begins in the northern part of Manhattan.


New York Times: Mapping Segregation

Ironically, not too long ago Washington Heights got a new name.

Upper Manhattan Designated First ‘Little Dominican Republic’

Last edited by AntonioR; 11-07-2018 at 01:49 PM..
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Old 11-07-2018, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Formerly NYC by week; ATL by weekend...now Rio bi annually and ATL bi annually
1,208 posts, read 1,595,779 times
Reputation: 706
Quote:
Originally Posted by EVANGELISTTI View Post
There is Cape Verdeans only after 1975. Before that they were portuguese, they hold portuguese passport, your grandfather immigrated into US as a portuguese man. Did you get the point?
Cape Verdians were always Cape Verdians......he was not a portuguese man

Your point is moot and narrative false bro...just admit it. Was he brainwashed? Yes.....just like diaspora blacks in a bunch of colonized countries and islands.

Lmao...thiss is truly entertaining......carry on....
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