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Old 12-24-2018, 09:23 AM
 
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I saw pictures of Lima’s shantytowns. Some of them are shacks but some are bigger houses that almost look like a typical residential neighborhood in Lima. I know many people who live in the shantytowns are emigrants from the Andes looking for better opportunities in Peru’s capital. Is it safe to say that these migrants start off living in a shack or simple type of home, then they build or move to a bigger house in the same neighborhood. Is that true?
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Old 12-24-2018, 11:47 AM
 
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They usually build up their house
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Old 01-01-2019, 12:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whogoesthere View Post
They usually build up their house
Thanks.
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Old 01-01-2019, 06:51 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 15 hours ago)
 
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If you like to read, I highly recommend “The Other Path” by Hernando de Soto, a Peruvian economist. I read the book over a decade ago and still have it in my personal library. At a certain point in the book he focuses on the differences between poor neighborhoods in developed countries and poor neighborhoods in developing countries.

In developed countries, poor neighborhoods were once middle class or wealthy areas that fell into decay. The falling property values made the areas affordable for the poorest people, but these people don´t rebuild the neighborhood. Instead, poor neighborhoods either continue to decay or they freeze at a certain level of decay. The only way poor neighborhoods in developed countries flourish again is if gentrification takes place, but that implies displacing the poor residents with more affluent non-locals, not to mention that the wealth creation is done primarily by people that don´t live in the neighborhood.

In developing countries, poor neighborhoods were once virgin land that was suddenly invaded by landless peasants. Everything happens informally and the crudest shacks dot the landscape. As time goes on, the poor people actually improve their neighborhoods by investing their savings into their homes. As time goes on, the initial crude shacks gives way to larger homes of cinderblocks or bricks. Little by little the people add rooms or a second or third floor, they paint the walls, they replace rustic windows with more elaborate ones. The same improvements are done on the inside. The neighborhood itself also improves with the eventual paving of the streets, electrification, access to potable water, etc. Schools are built. Many small businesses are founded and they grow along with the neighborhood.
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Old 01-02-2019, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Good post Antonio. That seems like a very accurate description.
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Old 01-07-2019, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Tijuana Exurbs
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I get the point being made in post #2, but wonder about this:

In developed countries, they start with good quality housing stock that ages and decays, but at its core, the soundness and quality of the original buildings remain.

In developing countries, they start with vernacular housing built to no particular standards, and when improved it is done hodge-podge. Regardless of what is improved, the neighborhood is built upon a rotten foundation.

We call this "bones". The bones of the buildings are weaker in the low income neighborhoods of developing countries, and that will always impede the quality of life of the residents. Over time, things improve, but never to 1st World standards.

Is there truth to my observation or am I fundamentally off base?
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Old 01-10-2019, 07:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kettlepot View Post
I get the point being made in post #2, but wonder about this:

In developed countries, they start with good quality housing stock that ages and decays, but at its core, the soundness and quality of the original buildings remain.

In developing countries, they start with vernacular housing built to no particular standards, and when improved it is done hodge-podge. Regardless of what is improved, the neighborhood is built upon a rotten foundation.

We call this "bones". The bones of the buildings are weaker in the low income neighborhoods of developing countries, and that will always impede the quality of life of the residents. Over time, things improve, but never to 1st World standards.

Is there truth to my observation or am I fundamentally off base?
There are some exceptions.

You could look into Los Olivos in Lima. It was once a shantytown but from what I understand looks like the rest of Lima.

Some “Young Towns” in Lima Not So Young Anymore – COHA

This article explains how Los Olivos started off as a shantytown but now has a modem shopping mall and even casinos. The mall is Megaplaza, one of the largest in South America.
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