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Old 01-29-2019, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,438,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ner View Post
As for South America, French is obviously spoken in French Guiana. In Brazil, there is a Native American tribe called the Karipúna, whose elders still speak a French-based Creole. They live in Amapá state. It is thought by some that they moved there from French Guiana.



To me, the tribal name 'Karipúna' sounds a lot like the name of the people living on the Caribbean coast of Belize, Guatemala and Honduras, namely the Garifuna. Both have their ethnogenesis in the Carib people (for which the Caribbean is named), at least in part. DNA-wise, the Garifuna are about 80% West African and 20% Carib, but their language is a phonetically Africanized version of Carib, with about 15% of the its vocabulary derived from French (I think the numbers, days of the week, and months of the year, among others, are all in French). They lived on St Vincent. They were enslaved by the native Carib after a slave ship wrecked off their island's coast, but eventually diseases the Africans carried and for which the Caribs had no immunity, killed off all the Caribs. When the British took over the island, the Garifuna said, in effect, "you can't enslave us, we are native Carib people." So, the British shipped them off to Roatan Island. From there, they hopped over to Honduras.
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Interesting. Never hear of the Karipuna before.

I have heard Haitians use the word Neg quite often. I always thought they were just using it as the French N word.


[quote]
Quote:
Lewiston-Auburn is in what Mainers call "Central Maine". It is not near the border, but it is closer to Quebec than New Brunswick. It is a good old-fashioned New England mill town. It has been losing population for decades, but now some 40% of elementary school children in Lewiston are of African or African-American origin (when I was in high school, just two of my classmates were black [all grades combined]).
Is there a lot of African Americans in other cities in Maine like Portland or Bangor? There are quite a few in Nova Scotia I imagine there other similar black communities in Maine. Interesting though there are barely any Black folks in New Brunswick.

Quote:
I did go to high school with just one girl who spoke Acadian-like French (her parents were from New Brunswick). All others I knew who spoke French spoke a type of low-class Canadian (Quebec) French. In high school, I worked in the produce department of a local supermarket. The guys in the meat department were all from Aroostook county and spoke like Acadians.

Northern Aroostook county still has French-speaking Acadian communities... Madawaska, Fort Kent, Van Buren, Frenchville (!!!!), Ste-Agathe (St. Agatha)...
The closest I have been to Aroostook is Edmunston New Brunswick, right on the border.
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Old 01-29-2019, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,438,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I know. You've lived in a surprising number of places in Canada! You seem to move consistently westwards. Perhaps you will end up in Vancouver eventually.
I am making my way west very slowly!.....I am starting to miss eastern Canada though.
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Old 01-30-2019, 03:35 AM
 
Location: DC metropolitan area
632 posts, read 286,785 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Is there a lot of African Americans in other cities in Maine like Portland or Bangor? There are quite a few in Nova Scotia I imagine there other similar black communities in Maine. Interesting though there are barely any Black folks in New Brunswick.
Not really *African-American* in the sense of descendants of slaves, but there are many blacks in Portland and Lewiston. In both places, a lot of Somalis have moved in... not "straight-off-the-boat" or airplane, but from other cities in the U.S. One backstory I read, is that parents were looking to get away from urban African-American ghetto culture in order to raise up their children in a safer environment and one more conducive to their children's success. Another backstory I have heard is because Maine is one of the most generous states when it comes to public social welfare spending. It seems in Lewiston, they now have a critical mass and other ethnic Africans are moving there, including French-speaking ones. The housing costs are rock bottom. That is probably a factor as well.

Bangor has a few individuals/families, but mostly African-Americans. I've read up some on black people in Nova Scotia. They have a real long history there.

The English-speaking people of Sierra Leone are descendants of black Nova Scotians, I believe.,. similar to how English-speaking Liberians are descendants of *repatriated* American ex-slaves.
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Old 01-30-2019, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
975 posts, read 1,965,458 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ner View Post
One thing French-speaking Cajuns say to each other is mon nèg, meaning 'my man'. However, etymologically speaking nèg is the n-word in English. '.
It´s really a term of endearment and respect, though now that I´m removed from there and I don´t say it to people on a regular basis, I can see why folks might get offended or confused about it!

There is also T-whatever name you want in front of the word, and it´s similar to the Spanish diminutive in that it´s affectionate and doesn´t necessarily mean a person is smaller or younger (though it´s often used in that context). People even say T-neg to each other!
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Old 01-30-2019, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Montreal > Quebec > Canada
477 posts, read 426,668 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
It´s really a term of endearment and respect, though now that I´m removed from there and I don´t say it to people on a regular basis, I can see why folks might get offended or confused about it!

There is also T-whatever name you want in front of the word, and it´s similar to the Spanish diminutive in that it´s affectionate and doesn´t necessarily mean a person is smaller or younger (though it´s often used in that context). People even say T-neg to each other!
T as in "p'tit", the abbreviated form of "petit" (which means small)? It's very common to use p'tit in French, as in "mon p'tit ami" (my boyfriend), for example
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Old 01-30-2019, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
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Exactly, given the context it sounds exactly how we say the letter ¨T¨ in English...but it obviously comes from the word petit...or so I think.
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Old 01-30-2019, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,348,673 times
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Yes, adding the T (actually spelled Ti- or ti- most of the time) is basically the same as adding -ito (as in Juanito) to the end of someone's name in Spanish or l'il (as in l'il Joe) before someone's name in English.


Ti-Jean
Ti-Paul
Ti-Louis (as in Ti-Louis Robichaud, the first Acadian Premier of New Brunswick)
Ti-Toine (for someone named Antoine)




It's also used in conjunction with physical characteristics.


For example, these two guys.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ao3txJhsp14


Ti-Blanc probably refers to him being blond, or maybe very pale


Ti-Gars = l'il fella



Now that I think of it, some form of the "Ti-" prefix is actually quite common across almost the entire Francophonie of the Western Hemisphere, from French Canada down to Louisiana and the Caribbean.


It's much, much less common in francophone Europe and Africa.
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Old 01-30-2019, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,348,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ner View Post
The English-speaking people of Sierra Leone are descendants of black Nova Scotians, I believe.,. similar to how English-speaking Liberians are descendants of *repatriated* American ex-slaves.

And Black Nova Scotians for the most part are descended from freed African-American slaves who fled to Canada centuries ago.


They're now concentrated in a few communities outside Halifax but at one time there were tiny virtually all-black villages scattered throughout rural Nova Scotia. With among other things very vibrant community churches where the singing was straight out of, I dunno... "Sister Act"


Anyway that's what several members of the Nova Scotia side of my family have told me.
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Old 01-30-2019, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,348,673 times
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Still with the "Ti-" prefix.


Here is La Ballade de Jean Batailleur, by Zachary Richard from Lafayette, Louisiana.




Prends ton couteau allons dehors
Viens donc danser, danser avec Ti-Jean
A coups de poing et au fusil
Je suis le plus fort dans le pays
Ça m'a donné, donné que de l'ennui
Que des points d'suture et des ennemis




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5EHur93dA_U
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Old 01-30-2019, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,348,673 times
Reputation: 8603
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ner View Post
. However, etymologically speaking nèg is the n-word in English. Cajun French speakers have a very salty language. In the states, I hear black young people call each other 'my n*gger' frequently. Nèg in Haitian Creole also means 'man'.

My parents are in their 70s and when they were young the word "nègre" was the standard word for a black person. I am pretty sure this was fairly consistent across French-speaking Canada. It wasn't necessarily always meant to be disrespectful.


That usage of the word has now become verboten in polite company here just like in France, though the word "nègre" still exists legitimately in French as its other meaning is "ghost writer". (Bilingual non-francophones unfamiliar with this meaning often jump when they see the word in respectable publications.)


Of course, francophone culture being far less PC than anglophone culture, the word in its other meaning still pops up from time to time in legacy material.


For example, Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None used to be called Ten Little ******s or Ten Little Indians.

In French it's called Dix petits nègres, and it's never been changed in our language.


So in theory it's not impossible to be walking down the street in Montreal or Paris and see posters in big letters advertising a theatrical production of Agatha Christie's DIX PETITS NÈGRES. (I've actually seen this myself - not making this up.)
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